Ingredients of a Roast Beef Sandwich



  • Now you and I probably would think two essential ingredients of a roast beef sandwich would be, well, roast beef and some sort of bread. Turns out it's free range chicken and rice. Who knew?

    Roast Beef Sandwich

    One thing that isn't a WTF though is the quality of food at Rincon Market. A regular lunch spot of mine for quality sandwiches and that feta-olive-tomato salad I can't get enough of. I'll take all the WTF labels they can dish out so long as they keep the great food coming! :-) 



  •  Chuck Norris knew! You shoulda asked.



  •  Now I know why all the things we eat tastes like chicken.



  • Sounds like just about every other item of processed food on the market really. The main focus of the product (e.g. "Cheesey cheese-stuff with added cheesiness (contains 0.01% cheese)") is normally the ingredient you can count on it either not having, or having only in trace amounts. On the plus side, your sandwich has a double portion of salt!

    I've actually just read one of Raymond Chen's posts about the same sort of thing.

    Anyway, from now on I'm going to demand that ALL my sandwiches are served on a bed of rice. 



  • They forgot to close the <breast> tag.



  • @Cap'n Steve said:

    They forgot to close the <breast> tag.

    I thought that including "<breast>" was a subliminal sexual reference to encourage someone to purchase the sandwich...or to make them forget the ingredient list they just read.



  • @RayS said:

    Sounds like just about every other item of processed food on the market really. The main focus of the product (e.g. "Cheesey cheese-stuff with added cheesiness (contains 0.01% cheese)") is normally the ingredient you can count on it either not having, or having only in trace amounts. On the plus side, your sandwich has a double portion of salt!
     

    Huh?  Roast Beef isn't processed food, it's just, well, roasted beef.  Usually sliced right at the deli.  As opposed to a hot dog, for instance, which would by all possible definitions be processed food.

     

    ( - Theoretically, at least.) 



  • <xsd:element name="breast" minOccurs="2" maxOccurs="2"/>

    is a much more important reason to worry about their document not validating.



  • @shadowman said:

    Roast Beef isn't processed food

    A lot of the time it's a pressed roll of meat that's designed to resemble roast beef.  Especially at delis.



  • @shadowman said:

    Roast Beef isn't processed food, it's just, well, roasted beef.

    Here in the UK we have an explicitly written law that says things called "Beef" must contain at least 60%* actual cow parts.

    The fact that anybody thought it necessary to legislate this pretty much says it all. 

    (* - may not be the actual number, varied depending on the animal involved, +/- 10%)



  • I was just as shocked when I read that peanut butter "can contain traces of peanut".  Who knew?



  •  @asuffield said:

    Here in the UK we have an explicitly written law that says things called "Beef" must contain at least 60%* actual cow parts.

    The fact that anybody thought it necessary to legislate this pretty much says it all. 

    (* - may not be the actual number, varied depending on the animal involved, +/- 10%)

    Even worse is that sometimes it's even worse than even that says. For example, to be called a pork sausage it must contain at least X% (again not sure of the exact figure) pork. BUT..... Y% of X can actually be pork fat, so we're talking a percent of a percent of the product actually being real meat. And of course, there's no telling just which part of the body that already small percentage is.



  • @shadowman said:

    As opposed to a hot dog, for instance, which would by all possible definitions be processed food.
     

    Processed? Definitely.

    Food? Questionable at best... 



  •  The "fruit yoghurt"-oid drinks here contain around 2% fruit.

    Pancake mix* contains 95% flour.

     

    ) actual product. Just like the newnew* salt+pepper mix shaker.



  •  @dhromed said:

    Pancake mix* contains 95% flour.

    Wow.. I always thought it was a made from gound up pancakes...

     

    ...wait. What?



  • @MarcB said:

    Food? Questionable at best... 

    But they taste so good, especially hot off a grill.



  • @dhromed said:

    Pancake mix* contains 95% flour. 

    That jives.  When I make pancakes from scratch, the dry mix is about 95.5% flour, based upon some quick calculations.  Of course, if this is that "just add water" stuff, then the flour percentage should be smaller to reflect the dehydrated milk and eggs.



  • @bstorer said:

    @dhromed said:

    Pancake mix* contains 95% flour.

    That jives.  When I make pancakes from scratch, the dry mix is about 95.5% flour, based upon some quick calculations.  Of course, if this is that "just add water" stuff, then the flour percentage should be smaller to reflect the dehydrated milk and eggs.

    Agreed. If it had anymore flour, you might as well buy a bag of flour and get more for less.



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    @shadowman said:

    Roast Beef isn't processed food

    A lot of the time it's a pressed roll of meat that's designed to resemble roast beef.  Especially at delis.

     

    I've never seen that.  The processed lunchmeats are usually some sort of bologna or a "loaf" of some sort. 



  • @AbbydonKrafts said:

    @bstorer said:
    That jives.  When I make pancakes from scratch, the dry mix is about 95.5% flour, based upon some quick calculations.  Of course, if this is that "just add water" stuff, then the flour percentage should be smaller to reflect the dehydrated milk and eggs.

    Agreed. If it had anymore flour, you might as well buy a bag of flour and get more for less.

     

    That's correct. The small carton of "pancake mix" is possibly an attempt at marketing humour. Understand that you have to add milk and eggs yourself.

    And it's probably closer to 99%. The rest is salt.

    PS
    pancakes were good. yum.



  • @bstorer said:

    @dhromed said:

    Pancake mix* contains 95% flour.

    That jives.  When I make pancakes from scratch, the dry mix is about 95.5% flour, based upon some quick calculations.  Of course, if this is that "just add water" stuff, then the flour percentage should be smaller to reflect the dehydrated milk and eggs.

    Pancake mix I've seen is add milk. (Well, the directions say add milk and eggs, but I've never bothered with eggs).

    I don't see what's so strange about the existance of pancake mix. I'm too lazy to actually measure out the mix and milk (just do it by eye), if I tried to judge the baking powded needed as well I'd have a disaster.



  • @SuperousOxide said:

    if I tried to judge the baking powded needed as well I'd have a disaster.
     

    What baking powder? The name "pancake" does not imply "cake". :)



  • @dhromed said:

    What baking powder? The name "pancake" does not imply "cake". :)
     

    http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,165,146191-249197,00.html



  • @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    @dhromed said:

    Pancake mix* contains 95% flour.

    Wow.. I always thought it was a made from gound up pancakes...

    Ah, just like like Meow Mix!



  • @boomzilla said:

    I've never seen that.  The processed lunchmeats are usually some sort of bologna or a "loaf" of some sort. 

    GAH!! You said one of my gag words! Just reading that gives me an odd feeling in the back of my throat.

    It's true, though. Almost all deli meats, even freshly sliced, are bits compressed into rolls. Bologna and such is the same way, but it's a composite of many types. Obviously there are seasonings tossed in, too.



  • Pancakes


    @wikipedia said:
    American or Canadian pancakes (also known as hotcakes, griddlecakes, or flapjacks in the U.S.) contain a raising agent, usually baking powder, and contains different proportions of eggs, flour, and milk or buttermilk, which create a thick batter.

    I guess pancakes aren't the same all over, but that's what I grew up with. Specifically Bisquick.



  • @AbbydonKrafts said:

    @boomzilla said:

    I've never seen that.  The processed lunchmeats are usually some sort of bologna or a "loaf" of some sort. 

    GAH!! You said one of my gag words! Just reading that gives me an odd feeling in the back of my throat.

     

    It's true, though. Almost all deli meats, even freshly sliced, are bits compressed into rolls. Bologna and such is the same way, but it's a composite of many types. Obviously there are seasonings tossed in, too.

     

    GAH!! You said my safe word!



  • @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    GAH!! You said my safe word!

    I almost LOL'ed at the visual of someone yelling that out during a session.



  • @AbbydonKrafts said:

    @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    GAH!! You said my safe word!

    I almost LOL'ed at the visual of someone yelling that out during a session.

     

    I'll tape it for you sometime.



  • @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    I'll tape it for you sometime.

    Make sure you follow Spectate's recommendation: No editing!



  • @AbbydonKrafts said:

    @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    I'll tape it for you sometime.

    Make sure you follow Spectate's recommendation: No editing!

     

    Right. And then you can display it randomly on your screen with SSDS.



  • @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    @dhromed said:

    What baking powder? The name "pancake" does not imply "cake". :)
     

    http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,165,146191-249197,00.html

    @SuperousOxide said:

    Pancakes


    @wikipedia said:
    American or Canadian pancakes (also known as hotcakes, griddlecakes, or flapjacks in the U.S.) contain a raising agent, usually baking powder, and contains different proportions of eggs, flour, and milk or buttermilk, which create a thick batter.

    I guess pancakes aren't the same all over, but that's what I grew up with. Specifically Bisquick.

    Complex stuff, pancakes. 



  • @dhromed said:

    Complex stuff, pancakes. 

     

    The Daily WTF: not just for laughs, but also for learning. 



  • @AbbydonKrafts said:

    @boomzilla said:

    I've never seen that.  The processed lunchmeats are usually some sort of bologna or a "loaf" of some sort. 

    GAH!! You said one of my gag words! Just reading that gives me an odd feeling in the back of my throat.

    It's true, though. Almost all deli meats, even freshly sliced, are bits compressed into rolls. Bologna and such is the same way, but it's a composite of many types. Obviously there are seasonings tossed in, too.

    Does anyone else love olive loaf?



  • @bstorer said:

    @dhromed said:

    Complex stuff, pancakes. 

     

    The Daily WTF: not just for laughs, but also for learning. 

     

    But do you think I would enjoy Pancakes 2000 Enterprise Edition better? 



  • @dhromed said:

    @bstorer said:

    @dhromed said:

    Complex stuff, pancakes. 

     

    The Daily WTF: not just for laughs, but also for learning. 

     

    But do you think I would enjoy Pancakes 2000 Enterprise Edition better? 

    Yes, but you might find the per-user licensing scheme too bothersome.



  • @RayS said:

    But do you think I would enjoy Pancakes 2000 Enterprise Edition better? 

    Yes, but you might find the per-user licensing scheme too bothersome.

    The new 2008 edition is licensed by chewing time, and if you chew it for too long or it loses internet access to the licensing server, or your left front incisor is missing and you haven't applied the service pack, it turns into sand in your mouth.



  • @Cap'n Steve said:

    Does anyone else love olive loaf?

    me!



  • @asuffield said:

    @RayS said:

    But do you think I would enjoy Pancakes 2000 Enterprise Edition better? 

    Yes, but you might find the per-user licensing scheme too bothersome.

    The new 2008 edition is licensed by chewing time, and if you chew it for too long or it loses internet access to the licensing server, or your left front incisor is missing and you haven't applied the service pack, it turns into sand in your mouth.

    Mmm...  sand... for that extra crunch.



  • @GalacticCowboy said:

    @asuffield said:

    The new 2008 edition is licensed by chewing time, and if you chew it for too long or it loses internet access to the licensing server, or your left front incisor is missing and you haven't applied the service pack, it turns into sand in your mouth.

    Mmm...  sand... for that extra crunch.

    I love pizza on the beach for that extra bit of grit from sand. Now I'll have to try pancakes on the beach.


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