Untraceable



  • I wanted to officially start the thread regarding this movie "Untraceable." 

    I just saw the trailer.  It's full of such quotes as "He got all the way into my wireless network."  and "He hacked into my car's computer."

    On the other hand, they have a keen sight on the things that can drive up traffic.  There's a website that kills someone faster with every visitor to the site, and they didn't want to warn people of the site because it would attract visitors. 

    Thoughts? 



  • I've seen the trailer ... looks really stupid.  Another "The Net".  Networking Hacking Movie for Dummies.



  • I knew someone would make a thread about this. Don't forget the title comes from the fact that the site is completely untraceable and unblockable.



  • Untraceable my arse 😉

    I'm just bitter because I can't hack into an airport's private intranet or login to the government's secret database from a magically insecure login screen. And that I've never got my hands on a hacker tool with flashy graphics...



  • @Otterdam said:

    I'm just bitter because I can't hack into an airport's private intranet or login to the government's secret database from a magically insecure login screen. And that I've never got my hands on a hacker tool with flashy graphics...

     You don't get your hands on hacker tools with flashy graphics, you write your own. As you're hacking. Why do you think hackers type so fast? Half the work is setting up the DirectX stuff. Only losers use the command line.
     



  • @belgariontheking said:

    Thoughts? 

    Every password dialog has an override button. 



  • I didnt see anything impossible in the trailer (exept maybe the flashy gfx)

    "He got all the way into my wireless network" -  why not? break wep/wpa, exploit OS bug 

    "He hacked into my car's computer."  - has been demonstrated multiple times on both white- and black-hat convos... bluetooth all the way!

    "Untraceable website" - let me see you trace double-flux (or even single-flux) dns routing. Storm worm/botnet has been using single-flux for a year (exactly year in 2 days :)) and their control-server is yet to be traced



  • @DOA said:

    @Otterdam said:

    I'm just bitter because I can't hack into an airport's private intranet or login to the government's secret database from a magically insecure login screen. And that I've never got my hands on a hacker tool with flashy graphics...

     You don't get your hands on hacker tools with flashy graphics, you write your own. As you're hacking. Why do you think hackers type so fast? Half the work is setting up the DirectX stuff. Only losers use the command line.
     

    Counterexample! The fine documentation "Swordfish" showed that one can get 128-bit encrypted login forms to fill out themselves by repeatedly running ls /usr/bin.



  • @j6cubic said:

    @DOA said:
    @Otterdam said:

    I'm just bitter because I can't hack into an airport's private intranet or login to the government's secret database from a magically insecure login screen. And that I've never got my hands on a hacker tool with flashy graphics...

     You don't get your hands on hacker tools with flashy graphics, you write your own. As you're hacking. Why do you think hackers type so fast? Half the work is setting up the DirectX stuff. Only losers use the command line.
     

    Counterexample! The fine documentation "Swordfish" showed that one can get 128-bit encrypted login forms to fill out themselves by repeatedly running ls /usr/bin.

    What? That doesn't work on your b0x35? N00b!



  • @nomaddamon said:

    " - let me see you trace double-flux (or even single-flux) dns routing. Storm worm/botnet has been using single-flux for a year (exactly year in 2 days :)) and their control-server is yet to be traced

    Worm control server !== webserver 



  • TRWTF is Diane Lane keeps getting acting roles.  She couldn't act her way out of a wet paper bag.



  • @Otterdam said:

    I'm just bitter because I can't hack into an airport's private intranet or login to the government's secret database from a magically insecure login screen. And that I've never got my hands on a hacker tool with flashy graphics...

    Actually, all you need is a good pair of spy binoculars.  Wait for them to type in their password and just read it off the screen, since it will be printed in the clear in 36-point Arial Bold.  Top-secret passwords are generally a single dictionary word, 6-8 characters long, all uppercase, like "KNOCKERS" or something.

    Even better, just take a webcam snapshot of the room, and use the magic Photoshop filters to zoom in and enhance until you can read everything clearly.

     



  • @WhiskeyJack said:

    @Otterdam said:

    I'm just bitter because I can't hack into an airport's private intranet or login to the government's secret database from a magically insecure login screen. And that I've never got my hands on a hacker tool with flashy graphics...

    Actually, all you need is a good pair of spy binoculars.  Wait for them to type in their password and just read it off the screen, since it will be printed in the clear in 36-point Arial Bold.  Top-secret passwords are generally a single dictionary word, 6-8 characters long, all uppercase, like "KNOCKERS" or something.

    Heck, no. Even that's too complicated. The real password (or at least, uber-cracking gizmo) will be hidden inside a fake answering machine on the owner's desk, and we'll know this because he uses an answering service. 



  • I just went to the site.  If you click "yes I want to enter even though entering will cause harm to innocent people and I want to proceed without backup," it gives a warning:  91% of people have not heeded the warning.  Where are your morals?  then it gives an advertisement to join the federal cyber crimes task force. 

    Nothing else.  Just WTF. 



  • @nomaddamon said:

    Storm worm/botnet has been using single-flux for a year (exactly year in 2 days :)) and their control-server is yet to be traced

    That's because it doesn't have one. Storm is a decentralised botnet, there's nothing to trace. Instructions can be uploaded into it at any point. It's using a modified form of the edonkey protocol for internal distribution. The DNS game is just used to prevent people from being able to block storm at the firewall level - since the actual IP addresses in use are constantly changing, you can't update the firewall rules fast enough to prevent the worms from being able to access a server and join the botnet.



  • @CRNewsom said:

    TRWTF is Diane Lane keeps getting acting roles.  She couldn't act her way out of a wet paper bag.

     

    maybe so, but I would happily watch her try


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @belgariontheking said:

    I just went to the site.  If you click "yes I want to enter even though entering will cause harm to innocent people and I want to proceed without backup," it gives a warning:  91% of people have not heeded the warning.  Where are your morals?  then it gives an advertisement to join the federal cyber crimes task force. 

    Nothing else.  Just WTF. 

    I did the same but it started sending me fake instant messages and inviting me to play games.



  • Even if, by some magic, a certain IP was "untraceable", you could instantly stop 99% of traffic to the website by hijacking their DNS record.

    DNS is centrally controlled by ICANN, which is based in California, and has ties to the US government.  Were anything like the plot of the film were ever to occur, the DNS records for killwithme.com would be seized immediately.

    China's been screwing with DNS within their borders for years.

     

    In fact, re: "fast-flux" DNS, the administrators of .asia are already planning on blocking known phishing domains, to counteract that technique.



  • @MarcB said:

    The real password (or at least, uber-cracking gizmo) will be hidden inside a fake answering machine on the owner's desk, and we'll know this because he uses an answering service. 

    I loved that movie. The only good "cracking" movie I've ever seen.



  • @belgariontheking said:

    I just went to the site.  If you click "yes I want to enter even though entering will cause harm to innocent people and I want to proceed without backup," it gives a warning:  91% of people have not heeded the warning.  Where are your morals?  then it gives an advertisement to join the federal cyber crimes task force. 

    Nothing else.  Just WTF. 

    you should probably try clicking the big green button that tells you to join the cyber crimes task force by typing in your first name and last initial. 


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