Calc.exe is apparently cutting edge technology



  • I like reading Action Line in the Merc but:


    San Jose has an annual operating budget of nearly $1 billion.


    That's about $1,000 for every man, woman and child residing in the city.


    ([b]This is no small amount. The calculators on my iMac and Blackberry
    could not calculate this. I had to use pen and paper. You may remember
    those.[/b])

    I don't have either an iMac or a Blackberry but with ten seconds to get the population of San Jose, CA from wikipedia (929,936) I get $1075.34 from calc.exe

    Who knew it was so superior?

     

     


     



  • Should have used SwampSearch for a random result.



  • So I figured I'd run the calculation on my blackberry, and then laugh at the fool. But, I'll be damned, it only let me type in 10 million.

    Of course, he's still a fool for not just running the calculation with that and multiplying by 100... 



  • Or he could just type "1000000000 / 929936" into a google search box...or ""1000000000000000 / 929936" for that matter (it still works!)



  • @medialint said:

    San Jose has an annual operating budget of nearly $1 billion.

    That's about $1,000 for every man, woman and child residing in the city.

    ([b]This is no small amount. The calculators on my iMac and Blackberrycould not calculate this. I had to use pen and paper. You may rememberthose.[/b])

    I don't have either an iMac or a Blackberry but with ten seconds to get the population of San Jose, CA from wikipedia (929,936) I get $1075.34 from calc.exe

    Who knew it was so superior?

    Works great on my iMac calculator! 1 billion really isn't that big of a number. 🙂



  • Or you could ask someone over at DevShed 😉



  • @imikedaman said:

    Works great on my iMac calculator! 1 billion really isn't that big of a number. 🙂

    There are two calculators on Mac OS X. The actual Calculator.app can do this easily. (And it has a ridiculous number of features, too, if you bother to investigate.) But the calculator in Dashboard, which is often easier to get to, is very basic, and only goes up to 9 digits.

    The real hidden mathematical gem in Mac OS X, though, is Grapher.app, which is hidden in /Applications/Utilities for some reason. It's a descendant -- at least in spirit -- of the "Graphing Calculator" program that used to ship with Power Macs before Mac OS X, but with more features and styles and things.



  • @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    Should have used SwampSearch for a random result.

    So is SwampSearch the new Paula here, or is this going to pass with time.... ?



  • @kaamoss said:

    @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    Should have used SwampSearch for a random result.

    So is SwampSearch the new Paula here, or is this going to pass with time.... ?

    I don't think I will ever get that burning image of failure out of my mind.



  • @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    Should have used SwampSearch for a random result.

    Point.  Winner.



  • @kaamoss said:

    So is SwampSearch the new Paula here, or is this going to pass with time.... ?


    I already wrote <a href="http://forums.thedailywtf.com/forums/permalink/141396/142566/ShowThread.aspx#142566">The Bean</a> 🙂



  • @Benn said:

    @kaamoss said:
    So is SwampSearch the new Paula here, or is this going to pass with time.... ?


    I already wrote <a href="http://forums.thedailywtf.com/forums/permalink/141396/142566/ShowThread.aspx#142566">The Bean</a> 🙂

     



  • This entire scenario assumes that 1 Billion = 1 000 000 000, as it does in the US, but in many other countries, 1 Billion = 1 000 000 000 000.  This would change your result by precisely...<looks up engineering standards>...3 orders of magnitude.



  • @CRNewsom said:

    This entire scenario assumes that 1 Billion = 1 000 000 000, as it does in the US, but in many other countries, 1 Billion = 1 000 000 000 000.  This would change your result by precisely...<looks up engineering standards>...3 orders of magnitude.

    TRWTF



  • @CRNewsom said:

    This entire scenario assumes that 1 Billion = 1 000 000 000, as it does in the US, but in many other countries, 1 Billion = 1 000 000 000 000.  This would change your result by precisely...<looks up engineering standards>...3 orders of magnitude.

    Considering that the quote was in a US paper, referring to US (probably) dollars and regarding a US city, using a US standard (and ISO, I believe) billion is a pretty safe assumption.



  • @ChZEROHag said:

    @CRNewsom said:

    This entire scenario assumes that 1 Billion = 1 000 000 000, as it does in the US, but in many other countries, 1 Billion = 1 000 000 000 000.  This would change your result by precisely...<looks up engineering standards>...3 orders of magnitude.

    Considering that the quote was in a US paper, referring to US (probably) dollars and regarding a US city, using a US standard (and ISO, I believe) billion is a pretty safe assumption.

     I find both of them a strange way of naming numbers.  Billion being followed by trillian, quadrillion...I guess the next is pentillion?  Anyhow, the "bi" prefix should stand for two.  What are there two of in that number?  Nothing.  Let's take an illion to be three orders of magnitude....

    1 000 should be a singillion (or maybe a monillion or just an illion), 1 000 000 should be a billion, 1 000 000 000 should be a trillian, etc.  Forget thousands.



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    @ChZEROHag said:

    @CRNewsom said:

    This entire scenario assumes that 1 Billion = 1 000 000 000, as it does in the US, but in many other countries, 1 Billion = 1 000 000 000 000.  This would change your result by precisely...<looks up engineering standards>...3 orders of magnitude.

    Considering that the quote was in a US paper, referring to US (probably) dollars and regarding a US city, using a US standard (and ISO, I believe) billion is a pretty safe assumption.

     I find both of them a strange way of naming numbers.  Billion being followed by trillian, quadrillion...I guess the next is pentillion?  Anyhow, the "bi" prefix should stand for two.  What are there two of in that number?  Nothing.  Let's take an illion to be three orders of magnitude....

    1 000 should be a singillion (or maybe a monillion or just an illion), 1 000 000 should be a billion, 1 000 000 000 should be a trillian, etc.  Forget thousands.

    There you go getting all technical.

    Feel better?



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    1 000 should be a singillion (or maybe a monillion or just an illion), 1 000 000 should be a billion, 1 000 000 000 should be a trillian, etc.  Forget thousands.

    This is why we don't let Texans do math. 



  • @jcoehoorn said:

    Or you could ask someone over at DevShed 😉

     

    Oops my secret is out of the closet (sans-Victoria, unfortunately). Dang Big Brother Internet. 😉 



  • @The Vicar said:

    The real hidden mathematical gem in Mac OS X, though, is Grapher.app, which is hidden in /Applications/Utilities for some reason. It's a descendant -- at least in spirit -- of the "Graphing Calculator" program that used to ship with Power Macs before Mac OS X, but with more features and styles and things.

    I hope you've all seen The Graphing Calculator Story, about the guys who originally wrote it. The video link is a Google TechTalk from 2006, and it's a great story.

    Blurb:

    It's midnight. I've been working sixteen hours a day, seven days a week. I'm not being paid. In fact, my project was canceled six months ago, so I'm evading security, sneaking into Apple Computer's main offices in the heart of Silicon Valley, doing clandestine volunteer work for an eight-billion-dollar corporation.

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