Another Boss-ism



  • A lady came over to the tech department with a laptop that wouldn't "turn off".  She was locked out of doing anything, therefore couldn't turn it off so that she could restart it for use.  This is also called "frozen" to anyone out there like my boss.

    She hands it to MY BOSS.  He taps ctrl+alt+del a few times, then stares at it a minute and says "yep, you're right.  it won't turn off."  I'm listening, trying not to run my head through my monitor.  He then offers up a gem.  "The only thing I can think of doing is taking the battery out.  Cut the power."  So the unsavvy woman and my unsavvy boss kinda sit quietly pondering this disaster of a computer problem.  I quietly asked that they perhaps should hold the power button down.

     

    The darnedest thing happened..........I'll let you all guess.



  • The laptop self-destructed, taking the lives of this lady and your boss in the explosion, thereby cleansing the gene pool to ensure our long-term survival?



  • I deeply apologize for not including this in my last post, but I just remembered about a boss-ism that happened to me last week.

    When my company brings on new people, my boss occaisionally sends out a group of emails to introduce these people. Each email contains a Word document that has a little background info about the person, and a picture of them embedded in the Word file.

    My first problem is that my boss should send these out when the people are hired. Don't wait until there are 5 in the queue, and send them all out simultaneously. One guy was here for 6 weeks before his introduction email went out.

    The other problem is my boss's lack of ability to resize pictures. Does this happen to anyone else? Someone says they'll email you a photo, and they send you a 3 MB JPEG? Well, like I said, he sent out several of these in a span of 10 minutes.

    The first and second were 3 MB apiece. I didn't think it could get worse.

    The third was 11 MB. Exact same type of document, nothing special added, but it was more than 3x the size of the others.

    Apparently he screwed up the name of the document, so he tried to recall it, then he renamed the file, then resent it. Another 11 MB (and for those that have tried Outlook's recall feature, you know it sucks ass).

    So what happened? I opened Word and checked out the picture. It was scaled down to like 10% of it's original size, and at full scale it would have been 23" square. My first question is: Why does no one know about resizing images, or paying attention to the size of emails they send?? He was sending a Word document, maybe check the size of it before you send it to 120 people? The second question is: If you resize a picture in Word, why does it retain the original data and only display a resized picture?

    So yeah in the end we had 27 MB worth of emails in a 10-minute period, and it should be noted that the IT department just cut our mailboxes down to 50 MB a few months ago. Fun fun fun.



  • @Manni said:

    The second question is: If you resize a picture in Word, why does it retain the original data and only display a resized picture?





    I'm not a fan of Word or any other word processor, but there is a good
    reason Word does this: The crop/resize/constrast adjustment operations
    are reversible if you store
    them as metadata next to the picture, rather than change the picture
    itself. This makes a lot of sense if you store the primary copy of an
    image inside the Word file, or if you collaborate on the Word file with
    another person. Word wasn't designed to be a delivery format; people
    just decide to abuse it and use it as such.



    If you don't want Word storing a lot of data, don't paste a lot of data into a Word file.



    Yes, I know this doesn't solve your boss' bad behavior, but as much as Microsoft tries, Office can't be everything for everyone.




  • @ItsAllGeekToMe said:

    She hands it to MY BOSS.  He taps
    ctrl+alt+del a few times, then stares at it a minute and says "yep,
    you're right.  it won't turn off."





    Just what does your boss do? Not everyone understands (or necessarily
    should understand) the the power button is a funny combination between
    a software signal and a hardware failsafe. How many people know enough
    to hold the power button on a modern computer when everything else is
    locked up?




  • @Brendan Kidwell said:

    @ItsAllGeekToMe said:

    She hands it to MY BOSS.  He taps ctrl+alt+del a few times, then stares at it a minute and says "yep, you're right.  it won't turn off."



    Just what does your boss do? Not everyone understands (or necessarily should understand) the the power button is a funny combination between a software signal and a hardware failsafe. How many people know enough to hold the power button on a modern computer when everything else is locked up?

    I would hope the Technology Dept. Manager would know this.  And he does nothing.  Don't get me started.



  • @ItsAllGeekToMe said:

    A lady came over to the tech department
    with a laptop that wouldn't "turn off".  She was locked out of
    doing anything, therefore couldn't turn it off so that she could
    restart it for use.  This is also called "frozen" to anyone out
    there like my boss.

    She hands it to MY BOSS.  He taps ctrl+alt+del a few times, then stares at it a minute and says "yep, you're right.  it won't turn off."  I'm listening, trying not to run my head through my monitor.  He then offers up a gem.  "The only thing I can think of doing is taking the battery out.  Cut the power."  So the unsavvy woman and my unsavvy boss kinda sit quietly pondering this disaster of a computer problem.  I quietly asked that they perhaps should hold the power button down.

     

    The darnedest thing happened..........I'll let you all guess.



    Why did you give them the answer so easily?
    Let the 2 computer illiterate people bond a little bit while the work together to solve the problem.
    Then, after your boss gives up fussing with it, he'll likely come to you and ask you to help.
    This way, your boss gets to sweat a little bit (and will not be able to spend his time doing other potentially harmful things due to his lack of knowledge) and you will come out looking good in the end.

    - Dan


  • @Brendan Kidwell said:

    @Manni said:

    The second question is: If you resize a picture in Word, why does it retain the original data and only display a resized picture?



    I'm not a fan of Word or any other word processor, but there is a good reason Word does this: The crop/resize/constrast adjustment operations are reversible if you store them as metadata next to the picture, rather than change the picture itself. This makes a lot of sense if you store the primary copy of an image inside the Word file, or if you collaborate on the Word file with another person. Word wasn't designed to be a delivery format; people just decide to abuse it and use it as such.

    If you don't want Word storing a lot of data, don't paste a lot of data into a Word file.

    Yes, I know this doesn't solve your boss' bad behavior, but as much as Microsoft tries, Office can't be everything for everyone.

    Personally I hate the Office suite because it attempts to think for me way too much, but then provides no usable feedback when something goes wrong. Case in point, I was just dealing with a problem where a cell in Excel was supposed to calculate the difference between two dates, and was giving errors at random. Or so it appeared. I tried looking into all the problems it could be, from cell formatting, date references, number limitations... it turns out that someone had typed an invalid date (9/31/2004) in the field. Why is Excel smart enough to recognize date formats and change the cell formatting for me, but when there's an invalid date, it can't tell me what the problem is?

    As for your justification of Word storing the full picture, I offer a counterargument: Word wouldn't allow me to display the picture at 100% because it was too large. If I can't display it, then why keep the extra data? Also, have you tried getting a picture out of Word once you inserted it? The only way I found was to copy the picture, open up MS Paint, paste it in, and save it off.

    If I can't get the picture out, why preserve the original size and image quality after I've changed it? If I can't display it at full size, why not auto-size the picture down to the largest it can possibly display?

    But in the end, Word isn't the problem. Users are the problem. Software development would be so much easier if it weren't for them.



  • @Brendan Kidwell said:

    @ItsAllGeekToMe said:

    She hands it to MY BOSS.  He taps
    ctrl+alt+del a few times, then stares at it a minute and says "yep,
    you're right.  it won't turn off."





    Just what does your boss do? Not everyone understands (or necessarily
    should understand) the the power button is a funny combination between
    a software signal and a hardware failsafe. How many people know enough
    to hold the power button on a modern computer when everything else is
    locked up?




    Hell, I didn't know that either until I read it by pure chance some
    months ago. It's simply not very relevant knowledge since the
    alternative solution most people come up with on their own
    (disconnection the power cord / battery) works perfectly fine and does
    just the same thing. IMO the WTF here is that the "power button" had
    this stupid software shutdown function shoehorned into it, because of
    stupid users who couldn't be taught the actually relevant knowledge of how to properly shut down a system.




  • @Brendan Kidwell said:

    @Manni said:

    The second question is: If you resize a picture in Word, why does it retain the original data and only display a resized picture?





    I'm not a fan of Word or any other word processor, but there is a good
    reason Word does this: The crop/resize/constrast adjustment operations
    are reversible if you store
    them as metadata next to the picture, rather than change the picture
    itself.




    More importantly, it can make use of a full resolution of the output
    device. Actually resizing the pictures so that you get a crappy
    screen-resolution pixellated image even when printing on a
    high-resolution printer would be a REAL WTF.



  • @brazzy said:

    @Brendan Kidwell said:
    @ItsAllGeekToMe said:

    She hands it to MY BOSS.  He taps
    ctrl+alt+del a few times, then stares at it a minute and says "yep,
    you're right.  it won't turn off."





    Just what does your boss do? Not everyone understands (or necessarily
    should understand) the the power button is a funny combination between
    a software signal and a hardware failsafe. How many people know enough
    to hold the power button on a modern computer when everything else is
    locked up?




    Hell, I didn't know that either until I read it by pure chance some
    months ago. It's simply not very relevant knowledge since the
    alternative solution most people come up with on their own
    (disconnection the power cord / battery) works perfectly fine and does
    just the same thing. IMO the WTF here is that the "power button" had
    this stupid software shutdown function shoehorned into it, because of
    stupid users who couldn't be taught the actually relevant knowledge of how to properly shut down a system.






    Amazing, simply amazing. Thank you for making this post. I know now to
    ignore every subsequent post you make. You have saved me so much time!



    Sincerely,



    Richard Nixon



  • @brazzy said:

    @Brendan Kidwell said:
    @Manni said:

    The second question is: If you resize a picture in Word, why does it retain the original data and only display a resized picture?





    I'm not a fan of Word or any other word processor, but there is a good
    reason Word does this: The crop/resize/constrast adjustment operations
    are reversible if you store
    them as metadata next to the picture, rather than change the picture
    itself.




    More importantly, it can make use of a full resolution of the output
    device. Actually resizing the pictures so that you get a crappy
    screen-resolution pixellated image even when printing on a
    high-resolution printer would be a REAL WTF.




    true.dat



  • @brazzy said:





    Hell, I didn't know that either until I read it by pure chance some
    months ago. It's simply not very relevant knowledge since the
    alternative solution most people come up with on their own
    (disconnection the power cord / battery) works perfectly fine and does
    just the same thing. IMO the WTF here is that the "power button" had
    this stupid software shutdown function shoehorned into it, because of
    stupid users who couldn't be taught the actually relevant knowledge of how to properly shut down a system.






    I know it is hidden, but I can't think of a better design.  
    You do not want computers to turn off accidently, yet you need a
    failsafe that always works.   This is particularly a problem
    on laptops where there are only limited places a button/switch can go,
    any of which you might hit accidently (think typing in a dark room and
    reaching for the escape key and going just a little too
    far)  



    It is not obvious, but it is the best compromise.



    Removing the battery is dangerous.  The potential for sparks as
    the battery is disconnected (which can destroy your electronics in the
    surge) is too high for comfort.



  • @Richard Nixon said:

    Amazing, simply amazing. Thank you for making this post. I know now to
    ignore every subsequent post you make. You have saved me so much time!




    The eloquence of your argument blinds me.




  • @hank miller said:

    It is not obvious, but it is the best compromise.


    Not saying it isn't, just that it's hardly something to judge competence by.



    @hank miller said:
    Removing the battery is dangerous.  The potential for sparks as
    the battery is disconnected (which can destroy your electronics in the
    surge) is too high for comfort.




    How exactly would there be a surge? The battery has a certain voltage
    it can supply; it may supply less when aged, spent or heavily strained,
    but not more.  Why would there be a higher voltage during
    disconnection? Static electricity could be a problem when you touch the
    contacts, I guess, but the contacty usually don't even get exposed when
    you just disconnect the battery and replace it immediately.




  • @brazzy said:

    @Richard Nixon said:
    Amazing, simply amazing. Thank you for making this post. I know now to
    ignore every subsequent post you make. You have saved me so much time!




    The eloquence of your argument blinds me.






    Let's be best friends!



    Sincerely,



    Richard Nixon



  • @Richard Nixon said:

    Amazing, simply amazing. Thank you for making this post. I know now to
    ignore every subsequent post you make. You have saved me so much time!



    Sincerely,



    Richard Nixon




    I'm sick of telling you to fuck off, shitstain.  We don't need your bullshit here.



  • @brazzy said:





    How exactly would there be a surge? The battery has a certain voltage
    it can supply; it may supply less when aged, spent or heavily strained,
    but not more.  Why would there be a higher voltage during
    disconnection? Static electricity could be a problem when you touch the
    contacts, I guess, but the contacts usually don't even get exposed when
    you just disconnect the battery and replace it immediately.






    Sparks.   DC voltage doesn't cut off nicely when you remove a battery.  



    This might or might not be theoretical.   I'm not an EE, I
    just know that sparks are not a good thing around electronics, so
    anything that could produce them are used as a last resort.



    It wouldn't surprise me if the laptop was protected against this, but I wouldn't never count on it given a choice.



  • @hank miller said:



    Sparks.   DC voltage doesn't cut off nicely when you remove a battery.  



    This might or might not be theoretical.   I'm not an EE, I
    just know that sparks are not a good thing around electronics, so
    anything that could produce them are used as a last resort.




    I'm not an EE either, but that doesn't sound right. Again: the battery
    is NOT CAPABLE of producing more than the given voltage, and I don't
    see how you'd get a higher voltage during disconnection - I'm pretty
    sure it will cut off quite nicely, i.e. suddenly, and I doubt the
    "official" power switch has any different effect. Theoretically, it
    could let the power taper off gradually, but I don't see why that would
    be necessary. Hardware that needs to do something when the power is cut
    (such as the HDs parking their heads) have capacitors to power them. A
    special power switch wouldn't help if you have an actual power outage.



    "Sparks" is no answer at all, it's a side effect of electricity
    bridging a gap between two contacts through air. If you get sparks at
    all at the low voltages of a laptop battery, you'd get them as well
    when the computer is switched off and the only problem they might cause
    is corrosion of the contacts. What you heard about sparks being "bad"
    is referring to sparks generated by static electricity, which HAS very
    high voltages and can therefore damage unprotected equipment. But
    that's not relevant here, as I already mentioned.




  • @brazzy said:

    @hank miller said:


    Sparks.   DC voltage doesn't cut off nicely when you remove a battery.  



    This might or might not be theoretical.   I'm not an EE, I
    just know that sparks are not a good thing around electronics, so
    anything that could produce them are used as a last resort.




    I'm not an EE either, but that doesn't sound right. Again: the battery
    is NOT CAPABLE of producing more than the given voltage, and I don't
    see how you'd get a higher voltage during disconnection - I'm pretty
    sure it will cut off quite nicely, i.e. suddenly, and I doubt the
    "official" power switch has any different effect. Theoretically, it
    could let the power taper off gradually, but I don't see why that would
    be necessary. Hardware that needs to do something when the power is cut
    (such as the HDs parking their heads) have capacitors to power them. A
    special power switch wouldn't help if you have an actual power outage.



    "Sparks" is no answer at all, it's a side effect of electricity
    bridging a gap between two contacts through air. If you get sparks at
    all at the low voltages of a laptop battery, you'd get them as well
    when the computer is switched off and the only problem they might cause
    is corrosion of the contacts. What you heard about sparks being "bad"
    is referring to sparks generated by static electricity, which HAS very
    high voltages and can therefore damage unprotected equipment. But
    that's not relevant here, as I already mentioned.






    I tend to agree, but want to offer an alternate explanation: Its not
    the sparks that are bad but the fact that when removing a battery, the
    battery could be disconnected momentarily, then reconnected briefly,
    then disconnected again. This could potentially cause stress to the
    components. Though, probably not. I don't know. I just decided to throw
    that out. fwiw, my remote controls don't seem to be affected by battery
    removal, Nor does a whole host of other electronic devices that are
    battery powered, but don't necessarily have an on-off switch. Aside
    from that, the power switch essentially does the same thing as removing
    the battery, it opens the circuit.



    Just my 0.5¢


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