I hate my life



  • So my mother (mid 70's) knows nothing about computers. My brother, the accountant, knows not much more, except how to use tab and the numeric keypad. He gives my mother an old pc, so she can e-mail with friends (consisting of 2 actual friends, 1 sister in law and 1 niece). Rather than installing anti-virus software, which would lead to the inevitable flood of questions, such as "what's this pop up talking about an update?", he decides that dial-up is slow enough that no virus would ever get through. Interestingly enough, for 2 years, it worked out just that way.

    Now he decides that for only $5/month more, she can get cable-tv/cable-internet/cable-telephone. However, this provides an always-on cable-speed connection. However, he still doesn't want to run AV s/w because she will be confused by the popups. Of course, she has the eye hand coordination of a brick, and so winds up clicking on everything and anything before finally clicking on what she's aiming at.

    It takes a week and she's calling every 5 minutes: "what's this pop up for Amazon | e-bay | p_3n15 enlargement | ...?"

    Naturally, I get sick of it and tell her to pester my brother, since this is his doing. He's too busy at work, and, per my mother's exact words: "You're the computer expert, YOU fix it!" (it's not like I have a full time job or a family to support</sarcasm>).

    Of course, she's stuck with a 2 year contract, so I can't even revert the connection to dial up to slow down the influx of viruses, key loggers, etc. It took me NINE hours to clean all the crap off her box.  Then I installed the AV s/w, and SHOWED her what the upgrade popup's would look like. She still calls me, all confused and whatnot, but much less so.

    Out of sheer frustration, I e-mailed my brother a bomb (containing most of the key-loggers and popup-crap that I took off my mother's box) at his home e-mail account. He'll open it because it's from me. ( I firmly believe that payback should be a bitch).

    I can't win. Do any of you have to put up with this from your families?

     



  • Thankfully there's nobody in my family providing the less computer literate members with bad advice, so I'm never cleaning up other people's mess.  But yes, I do get asked to provide tech support every so often, and yes, sometimes it does take hours of my time.  Despite the fact that I don't want to do it, I do it anyway, because they are my family, I love them, and they happily help me with stuff I'm no good at whenever I ask.

     This isn't directed at you, but it really bugs me when other geeks whinge about having to provide help to their family, especially their parents.  As far as I'm concerned, it's something you just do for your family.
     



  • I know the feeling, snoofle. I'm the only tech-savvy person in my family, so I constantly have to answer questions such as "Why doesn't this page work?" (the server was down) and "I clicked on an image that said CONGRATULATIONS! YOU WON!, was that bad?", and fix complicated problems like when the monitor cable is unplugged. Unfortunately for me my dad has a lot of friends, and they actually know less about computers than he does. Which means that I'm the on-call computer tech for about 20 people. But it doesn't end there. Because I know a lot about computers, I should also know a lot about cellphones/TVs/stereos/anythingThatUsesElectricity (BECAUSE THAT MAKES SO MUCH SENSE, RIGHT?!)



  • I agree 100% with everything Nozz said.  I would just like to add that you are a total douchebag for sending that stuff to your brother.  I've driven 4 hours (each way) to a family member's house to help them out with various computer-related things.  Of course I didn't care for the 8-hour round trip, but it's still family.

    On the other hand, your mom kind of sounds like a bitch for laying it out on you.

    Bottom line: it's your family; I don't care what you do.
     



  • I just want to reply that thankfully my dad is a tech guy (mainframe only, but it's worth something).  My family isn't the one I get tech support calls from (at 11:30 pm - when I am in bed) but it's my friend from college who apparently hasn't made any friends since college and calls me for all of her IT needs.  She used to f*** a guy who knows about this stuff too. 

    Why does she call me?



  • Nine hours? It would have taken you three to back up what little she had on there (knowing the type of user, she probably didn't have much of anything worth backing up) and just reinstalling Windows.

     Work smarter, not harder. 😉 



  • I have given up on windows users. If i have to fix a worm infested Windows installation i install Linux on the machine. Ubuntu is great for that. They have games/apps that run on windows only ? No Problem: dual boot, and no internet for the Windows install.

    If someone wants tech support from me, they have to stick to my rules. Its as simple as that.



  • @belgariontheking said:

    She used to f*** a guy who knows about this stuff too. 

    Why does she call me?

    Dude... 



  • No problems here. My mum has a Mac.



  • Ok, the mail bomb.... brilliant.

    I decided to expose one of my old PCs to the rest of the family recently but I came prepared. No net connection and made a nice acronis image of the hard drive beforehand. I figure that unless they start using the CD drive as a cup holder I can fix it with a minimal amount of effort.



  • @NSCoder said:

    No problems here. My mum has a Mac.

    That's a problem.



  • No sympathy at all here.  You know your brother doesn't know computers, but you're too lazy to help your own mother, so you leave him to do it instead.

    Then you whinge when your own laziness means you have to waste hours cleaning a problem that you could have prevented with a little bit of work, and to top it off, you then attempt to deliberately infect your brothers computer.

    Good god man.



  • Both my dad and sister are computer savvy, so there's no problem there.

     

    My mum hardly touches computers because she doesn't know anything about them and she likes it like that.

    Though... I once forgot my computer turned on during the weekend and she pulled the electrical plug because she wanted to turn it off without bothering us with a phone call.

    She then called my sister, in panic, because the UPS alarm went off. 🙂
     



  • @snoofle said:

    I can't win. Do any of you have to put up with this from your families?

    Not really. My mum doesn't have a computer, my gran's partner knows more about Windows than I do, my aunt just seems to leave hers to do whatever. Though last New Year I spent a few days trying to get their wireless working (I never WAS able to get encryption to behave itself), so since then, my policy is simple: I only do Linux. I don't troubleshoot Windows systems.



  • @Nozz said:

    As far as I'm concerned, it's something you just do for your family.
     

    It's not unreasonable to ask that the family put some effort in too, to listen to what you teach them, retain the knowledge, and apply it next time. If only.

    I am my bro's IT department. He lives 400 miles away, so it's almost always phone support. He asks for help with something - it's let's say a six-step procedure - on step three he starts finishing my sentences for me, and his guesses are always violently wrong (he's a poet, what would he know?), and then the bastard starts doing things (clicks, commands, etc) I haven't asked for, and then asks ME "where am I? how did I get here?" Aaaarrrrgggghhhh! 45 mins on the phone I wouldn't mind if we ever got somewhere. Suppressing my frustration so I don't scream at him takes a lot out of me.

    I can recommend having some other activity you do together when you can get your own back. In our case, we sail cruising yachts together, loving each other's company. And since he knows he's not a fully skilled sailor, I as captain make him do all the cooking and washing up AND climb down into the locker out at sea to open the seacock that lets the shit out of the holding tank. Oh sweet revenge!



  • @GreyWolf said:

    @Nozz said:

    As far as I'm concerned, it's something you just do for your family.
     

    It's not unreasonable to ask that the family put some effort in too, to listen to what you teach them, retain the knowledge, and apply it next time. If only.

    I am my bro's IT department. He lives 400 miles away, so it's almost always phone support. He asks for help with something - it's let's say a six-step procedure - on step three he starts finishing my sentences for me, and his guesses are always violently wrong (he's a poet, what would he know?), and then the bastard starts doing things (clicks, commands, etc) I haven't asked for, and then asks ME "where am I? how did I get here?" Aaaarrrrgggghhhh! 45 mins on the phone I wouldn't mind if we ever got somewhere. Suppressing my frustration so I don't scream at him takes a lot out of me.

    I can recommend having some other activity you do together when you can get your own back. In our case, we sail cruising yachts together, loving each other's company. And since he knows he's not a fully skilled sailor, I as captain make him do all the cooking and washing up AND climb down into the locker out at sea to open the seacock that lets the shit out of the holding tank. Oh sweet revenge!

    Has it occured to you that maybe your brother's POV is something like

    "Oh my brother is really annoying on the yacht, makes me do all the crappy stuff, just because he's the captain. Well I'll call him up with computer problems I know how to fix and deliberately make him tear his hair out."

    ?



  • @GreyWolf said:

    I am my bro's IT department. He lives 400 miles away, so it's almost always phone support. He asks for help with something - it's let's say a six-step procedure - on step three he starts finishing my sentences for me, and his guesses are always violently wrong (he's a poet, what would he know?), and then the bastard starts doing things (clicks, commands, etc) I haven't asked for, and then asks ME "where am I? how did I get here?" Aaaarrrrgggghhhh! 45 mins on the phone I wouldn't mind if we ever got somewhere. Suppressing my frustration so I don't scream at him takes a lot out of me.

    The advantage to doing tech support for your family as opposed to, say, customers, is you can tell them to stop being an idiot and do what they're told and threaten to leave them to it if they don't.

    And I wholly agree with the not supporting Windows thing. If they want my free help they get it on my terms or they can pay through the nose like everyone else.



  • @Nozz said:

    Thankfully there's nobody in my family providing the less computer literate members with bad advice, so I'm never cleaning up other people's mess.  But yes, I do get asked to provide tech support every so often, and yes, sometimes it does take hours of my time.  Despite the fact that I don't want to do it, I do it anyway, because they are my family, I love them, and they happily help me with stuff I'm no good at whenever I ask.

     This isn't directed at you, but it really bugs me when other geeks whinge about having to provide help to their family, especially their parents.  As far as I'm concerned, it's something you just do for your family.
     

    Actually, I've been doing it for 20 years, and I don't  mind donig it. What bugs me is when someone who KNOWS I do this for a living (eg: my mother) ignores my advice in favor of advice from someone who knows nothing about computers (eg: my brother), and then expects me to fix the mess.

     



  • @ryos said:

    Nine hours? It would have taken you three to back up what little she had on there (knowing the type of user, she probably didn't have much of anything worth backing up) and just reinstalling Windows.

     Work smarter, not harder. 😉 

    It's a really crappy machine with a busted cd drive; reinstalling windows would require putting more money into a piece of junk. I offered to buy her a new e-machine for just slightly more than what the parts and time would have cost me, but "I don't want you to spend the money on me". Time I can waste, but not money.l



  • @Zecc said:

    She then called my sister, in panic, because the UPS alarm went off. 🙂

    The PC is beeping? what did you do? the power cable?! you pulled it?! oh, my god!

    Jesus, jesus... don't go near the PC! switch off the power mains!! NOW! YOU HEAR ME?! NOW!! RUUUUN!!!

    muffled laugher 

     

    Not that you'd actually do this, but a man can fantasize...
     

     



  • I just set up less tech-savvy family members to run with restricted user accounts.

    Of course, badly written software will attempt to write to system directories (saving settings and whatnot) and thus break under older versions of Windows (Vista does at least offer a workaround), but since these family members are only going to be using Office and browsing the web, it works fine. I have not had to "fix" a single problem thus far, the only support I have to give is occasionally pointing out how to do something, not fix anything. 🙂



  • @DOA said:

    The PC is beeping? what did you do? the power cable?! you pulled it?! oh, my god!

    Jesus, jesus... don't go near the PC! switch off the power mains!! NOW! YOU HEAR ME?! NOW!! RUUUUN!!!

    muffled laugher 

     

    Not that you'd actually do this, but a man can fantasize...



    I'm glad I had put the coffee down before I got to this one. Otherwise, I would've had a mess to deal with (and possibly a fried keyboard).



  • @snoofle said:

    I e-mailed my brother a bomb (containing most of the key-loggers and popup-crap that I took off my mother's box) at his home e-mail account.

    Do any of you have to put up with this from your families?

     

    No, my brother has a sense of proportion and understands that being pestered by my mum could never justify his emailing me a tupping [i]bomb[/i].



  • @Willie Monkey said:

    Actually, I've been doing it for 20 years, and I don't  mind donig it. What bugs me is when someone who KNOWS I do this for a living (eg: my mother) ignores my advice in favor of advice from someone who knows nothing about computers (eg: my brother), and then expects me to fix the mess.

    Sounds to me like she want's to stop bothering you; it may be time for a training class.

    That said, my brother-in-law recently cornered me and launched into a list of things going wrong with his computer (he's not a computer guy).  At the end of the monolog he asked what I thought the problem was.  So, I handed him my card, said that office hours were between 8am and 5pm, and that I charge $150/hour. 

    He thought I was joking and laughed then asked if he could bring the machine to my house to fix.  Considering he is a restaurant manager, I asked if he would make a souffle for me if I brought the ingrediants to his house.  He said no, and hasn't asked me about his machine since.

     



  • @clively said:

    He thought I was joking and laughed then asked if he could bring the machine to my house to fix.  Considering he is a restaurant manager, I asked if he would make a souffle for me if I brought the ingrediants to his house.  He said no, and hasn't asked me about his machine since.

    Seems to me you went about this the wrong way. You could have offered to fix his computer if he'd make you the souffle. Could have been a good trade.

    Personally, I also took the "I bought a Mac" route. Couldn't be happier.



  • @clively said:

    He thought I was joking and laughed then asked if he could bring the machine to my house to fix.  Considering he is a restaurant manager, I asked if he would make a souffle for me if I brought the ingrediants to his house.  He said no, and hasn't asked me about his machine since.

    I've found this to be one of the more effective ways of dealing with this 'problem'. Just ask for something you really do want. This works well with family/friends who are, eg plumbers, gardeners, accountants, lawyers etc, but not so well with elderly grandparents...

    Either you get to do a trade of jobs that need doing, or they realise how inconvenient it is to you and give up asking (at least so much).



  • Being the only successful female computer scientist in my household, and by extension, several other households that relate to us, it means I'm usually the person who's asked for things. Thankfully, most of these other extended households HAVE people that know SOMETHING about computers, enough that they only ever call me if something's gone horribly wrong, or they're just really confused.

    My dad has once infected my computer with a virus that prevented me from moving my files, so I couldn't actually move things off my computer for backup. This ended in four hours of a grueling workaround. The reason this infection was a WTF to begin with was because I let dad use my computer because he wanted to use my 'faster' computer. His computer, is by no means, slow. It's only slow because of the things he runs/installs, but those are his dealings, and not my problem. If I tell him that those things are bad and bog down your computer, and he doesn't listen, he CHOSE NOT TO LISTEN. When he finally admits defeat and asks me to remove all those things, then I can tell him again.

    I guess I don't really have anything else to say, except that I hate it when my dad takes other people's "advice" over mine. When they start thrusting things andom apps on him and he installs them despite my warnings, only to find out later that they're crappy and actually DO mess up your computer, well, then I can have a little laugh and then try to keep him on some sort of safety leash.

    It hasn't been too bad, for the most part though.



  • @Willie Monkey said:

    Actually, I've been doing it for 20 years, and I don't  mind donig it. What bugs me is when someone who KNOWS I do this for a living (eg: my mother) ignores my advice in favor of advice from someone who knows nothing about computers (eg: my brother), and then expects me to fix the mess.

     

     

    This one I agree with 100%.  My mother will take advice from the tech support geeks at her office.  I try to explain that those guys have no clue and that is why they are still providing poor tech support (you should see the sad state of her work laptop) while those of us who do understand this stuff left that work behind (professionally anyway) with high school/college and moved on to developing the software that causes that initial call to the family geek.



  • @snoofle said:

    Out of sheer frustration, I e-mailed my brother a bomb (containing most of the key-loggers and popup-crap that I took off my mother's box) at his home e-mail account. He'll open it because it's from me. ( I firmly believe that payback should be a bitch).

    Oh, BTW, you do realise that's illegal, right? Also if he loses financially because of it, he could reasonably file a civil suit against you as well.



  • I kind of have the opposite problem, my dad is so paranoid about security that he installs whatever registry cleaner/AV software/random shit of the net that he can get his hands on and then gets more because "the computer is running slow"  and "some thing popped up saying to install it if your computer is slow".  You should see it, on startup it's loading so many things you just have to wait for about 20 minutes.  I should format it but i just can't be bothered, they have no idea where they keep their data and i can't be bothered finding it, also despite my constantly telling them not to use outlook they still won't use their web interface for mail and i'm not prepared to go stuffing around with a piece of shit like outlook to get it set up.  It amazes me though how susceptible people are to just doing things their computer tells them, if a box pops uip saying you need to install something people just click it, doesn't matter that the title bar is clearly from IE, that it doesn't quite look like a real windows dialogue, that it says "Advertisement" in the bottom right hand corner.  I'm constantly amazed by how easily non savvy users can bring their computer to a grinding halt with viruses, malware and useless programs in about a day.



  • Why not make her an account without admin rights?



  • @OperatorBastardusInfernalis said:

    Why not make her an account without admin rights?

    Because we don't live in your fantasy land where applications play nice and don't require admin rights to install or run. 



  • I've been encouraging my family members who ask me for advice to get Macs, actually. They are simple to set up, and (so far) my sister and my brother have been very happy with them.



  • To All:

    For the record, I wound up buying my mother a (cheaper) iMac (I bought one 2 months ago), and surprised her when I just plopped it on her desk. While she's still a bit confused, it's far more stable and way less susceptible to whatever.

    As for my brother's pc, it's unprotected (wide open to the internet), and is just used for surfing, chatting, email and a few kids games. He routinely reinstalls XP on it because of all the junk the kids click on. He thought I was inventive. I'm sure he'll retaliate (all in good fun). Besides, I write a lot of the s/w he uses in his office, and he does my taxes - neither of us would dare mess with the other in a serious way </smirk>

     



  • @element[0] said:

    It amazes me though how susceptible people are to just doing things their computer tells them, if a box pops uip saying you need to install something people just click it, doesn't matter that the title bar is clearly from IE, that it doesn't quite look like a real windows dialogue, that it says "Advertisement" in the bottom right hand corner.
    I think you've hit the nail perfectly on the head there. I'd always though it unlikely that those sort of fake dialog boxes (often to me blatantly fake; I've never seen a Windows error message shaking around like mad!). But it's not that they actually fool people - it's that they don't NEED to fool people who just click OK to everything. And when you get those ads that hijack the browser...well that's a WTF in itself.

    This, in turn, is why that Vista nonsense isn't going to help novice users. They'll just click OK every time. They don't know in any case whether what they were trying to do should require admin rights, especially with enough badly coded but legitimate programs that need it.



  • I like the fact that he thought she didn't need AV because she didn't have a fast enough connection.

     "I don't need car insurance - I never drive fast enough to crash!"
     



  • Doing IT for your family is given. Theres no way around it. And its a matter keeping your sanity that you DON'T LET "I'm almost as smart as you" type of members get their way. You should have installed Linux for your mother. She has no preconception of what a computer should do so Linux is not stranger that windows for her and no need for anti virus and no confusing pop-ups. I did this for my aunt. She did not complain.

     No, the troublesome members are those who THINK they know better. I have a dad like that. He used to do electronics, repair TVs and the sort once, so he is most certain at times that he is right and I am wrong. He manages to keep his computer clean without anti-virus, tho, even tho I know he  wonders around  in the internet. Before he had his own computer I had to clean the family computer once of some rather explicit ad-ware even tho that one had anti-virus. He had used IE to go browsing in bad places. After that he got a safety lecture, a registry lock down and Firefox and there have been no problems since then. Having a NAT between the world and (dumb)users helps too. But he still likes to argue with me now and then. He wants to build his own computer you see, but he has no clear understanding of what bits go together with what and why some older things wont fit with new ones.



  • @seaturnip said:

    @OperatorBastardusInfernalis said:

    Why not make her an account without admin rights?

    Because we don't live in your fantasy land where applications play nice and don't require admin rights to [b]install[/b] or run. 

    There's the answer, then. 🙂 The problem stems from users installing things they shouldn't be installing. Most of them just want to browse the internet and run Office.

    Vista will fix a lot of these issues, of course.



  • @benryves said:

    @seaturnip said:

    @OperatorBastardusInfernalis said:

    Why not make her an account without admin rights?

    Because we don't live in your fantasy land where applications play nice and don't require admin rights to install or [b]run[/b]. 

    There's the answer, then. 🙂 The problem stems from users installing things they shouldn't be installing. Most of them just want to browse the internet and run Office.

    Vista will fix a lot of these issues, of course.

    Note change of emphasis to the aspect that is more important. Too many Windows developers have had too long getting away with writing stuff that doesn't work unless it runs with admin rights, for example by insisting on writing to HKLM.



  • @benryves said:

    The problem stems from users installing things they shouldn't be installing. Most of them just want to browse the internet and run Office.

    What m0ffx said, and also, this is a home desktop not a corporate workstation on lockdown.  Who are you to decide this person can only use such-and-such narrow range of applications on their home computer?  That kind of defeats the point of having a PC at all.



  • @seaturnip said:

    Who are you to decide this person can only use such-and-such narrow range of applications on their home computer?  That kind of defeats the point of having a PC at all.


    I agree.. to an extent. If the user wants to trash it out and request a repair more than once, I think that user should run with restricted rights. Obviously you'd want to ask ahead of time, along with providing a full explanation of why it's a good thing to do.



  • @AbbydonKrafts said:

    @seaturnip said:
    Who are you to decide this person can only use such-and-such narrow range of applications on their home computer? That kind of defeats the point of having a PC at all.


    I agree.. to an extent. If the user wants to trash it out and request a repair more than once, I think that user should run with restricted rights. Obviously you'd want to ask ahead of time, along with providing a full explanation of why it's a good thing to do.

    You know, I had the same problem with my sisters and a laptop they share. I gave them their own restricted users and after they got settled but needed to install something I gave them the admin password. Now they could install stuff but not accidentally break the system because they would need to change user for that.



  • @death said:

    You know, I had the same problem with my sisters and a laptop they share. I gave them their own restricted users and after they got settled but needed to install something I gave them the admin password. Now they could install stuff but not accidentally break the system because they would need to change user for that.

    I tried that.

    The user concerned, while happy to install stuff by themselves on their previous PC under a default Admin account, was very unaccommodating when it came to <font face="courier new,courier">Right Click install.exe > Run As, fill out "Admin", "<password>"</font> under the restricted account on the new PC (I was also using this PC, under a restricted account., which is part of the reason I'd done it.)

    And they complained about how long it took to start up because I'd put AVG and SpyBot on there.

    And they had other complaints, all related to trying to keep the machine clean (IE/FF was another.)

    I lost it one evening after the umpteenth snide comment about how crap the PC was, so I 'un-did' everything.

    They then started complaining the next day about the "You aren't protected" balloons coming up, (and other things related to stuff I'd' removed,') and "could you put it back the way it was?"

     



  • @louis4232 said:

    I have given up on windows users. If i have to fix a worm infested Windows installation i install Linux on the machine. Ubuntu is great for that. They have games/apps that run on windows only ? No Problem: dual boot, and no internet for the Windows install.

    If someone wants tech support from me, they have to stick to my rules. Its as simple as that.

    What about multiplayer games that run over the Internet and need Windows? 



  • @shadowman said:

    @louis4232 said:

    I have given up on windows users. If i have to fix a worm infested Windows installation i install Linux on the machine. Ubuntu is great for that. They have games/apps that run on windows only ? No Problem: dual boot, and no internet for the Windows install.

    If someone wants tech support from me, they have to stick to my rules. Its as simple as that.

    What about multiplayer games that run over the Internet and need Windows? 


    Why dual-boot? Use virtual machines, host = linux/mac/windows w/o admin perms, guest = windows w/ admin perms. They can trash the VM all they want and you can reset it it if you've backed it up.



  • @Lingerance said:

    @shadowman said:
    @louis4232 said:

    I have given up on windows users. If i have to fix a worm infested Windows installation i install Linux on the machine. Ubuntu is great for that. They have games/apps that run on windows only ? No Problem: dual boot, and no internet for the Windows install.

    If someone wants tech support from me, they have to stick to my rules. Its as simple as that.

    What about multiplayer games that run over the Internet and need Windows? 


    Why dual-boot? Use virtual machines, host = linux/mac/windows w/o admin perms, guest = windows w/ admin perms. They can trash the VM all they want and you can reset it it if you've backed it up.

    If you're playing modern games, you don't want to be in a VM, you NEED the native performance.



  • @m0ffx said:

    @Lingerance said:
    @shadowman said:
    @louis4232 said:

    I have given up on windows users. If i have to fix a worm infested Windows installation i install Linux on the machine. Ubuntu is great for that. They have games/apps that run on windows only ? No Problem: dual boot, and no internet for the Windows install.

    If someone wants tech support from me, they have to stick to my rules. Its as simple as that.

    What about multiplayer games that run over the Internet and need Windows? 

    Why dual-boot? Use virtual machines, host = linux/mac/windows w/o admin perms, guest = windows w/ admin perms. They can trash the VM all they want and you can reset it it if you've backed it up.

    If you're playing modern games, you don't want to be in a VM, you NEED the native performance.

    Don't get sucked into the mentality that requires you to play those games in the first place then?

    Or, more realistically, to address Shadowman's concern, just enable the internet connection in Windows, and logically remove the HDD that contains *nix and the loader in software in Windows so Windows can't see it. I have unsubssstantiated concerns where Windows might be able to see 'the other disk' and 'the other disk' is my part of the PC - see thread passim)



  • @PJH said:

    @m0ffx said:
    @Lingerance said:
    @shadowman said:
    @louis4232 said:

    I have given up on windows users. If i have to fix a worm infested Windows installation i install Linux on the machine. Ubuntu is great for that. They have games/apps that run on windows only ? No Problem: dual boot, and no internet for the Windows install.

    If someone wants tech support from me, they have to stick to my rules. Its as simple as that.

    What about multiplayer games that run over the Internet and need Windows? 

    Why dual-boot? Use virtual machines, host = linux/mac/windows w/o admin perms, guest = windows w/ admin perms. They can trash the VM all they want and you can reset it it if you've backed it up.

    If you're playing modern games, you don't want to be in a VM, you NEED the native performance.

    Don't get sucked into the mentality that requires you to play those games in the first place then?

    Who needs fun, anyway?  Try a nice hobby like stamp collecting! 



  • @operagost said:

    @PJH said:
    @m0ffx said:
    @Lingerance said:
    @shadowman said:
    @louis4232 said:

    I have given up on windows users. If i have to fix a worm infested Windows installation i install Linux on the machine. Ubuntu is great for that. They have games/apps that run on windows only ? No Problem: dual boot, and no internet for the Windows install.

    If someone wants tech support from me, they have to stick to my rules. Its as simple as that.

    What about multiplayer games that run over the Internet and need Windows? 

    Why dual-boot? Use virtual machines, host = linux/mac/windows w/o admin perms, guest = windows w/ admin perms. They can trash the VM all they want and you can reset it it if you've backed it up.

    If you're playing modern games, you don't want to be in a VM, you NEED the native performance.

    Don't get sucked into the mentality that requires you to play those games in the first place then?

    Who needs fun, anyway?  Try a nice hobby like stamp collecting! 

    Or amateur radio even.


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