Game Boy Zelda Comes With Source



  • [QUOTE]

    Imagine you’re writing a Game Boy game, and the resulting ROM with all the code and data is just a little over one megabyte in size. No big deal, just pad the game to two megabytes, and use a 2 MB ROM in the cartridge. Just tell the linker to allocate 2 MB or RAM, put the actual data at the beginning, and then write a 2 MB “.gb” image to disk, which will then be sent to the ROM chip factory.

    Now imagine you’re doing this in MS-DOS. Your linker, probably written in C, calls malloc() of the runtime library of the C compiler. You already know where this is going?

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    [/QUOTE]

     




  • It's not even the real source. The image they're referring to is a fan-translated version, and the junk data on the end is from the translators, it's not present in the original cartridge.



  • There's no fan translation of Link's Awakening DX, there was an official English localization.  As the guy says, if disassembly was necessary it's because Nintendo lost their own source.  Pretty curious actually if an official remake is actually a ROM hack (though I'm not entirely convinced that the snippet of disassembly proves this).



  • Ah, okay, what makes more sense though is that this junk is from whoever dumped the ROM from the cartridge.



  • @seaturnip said:

    Ah, okay, what makes more sense though is that this junk is from whoever dumped the ROM from the cartridge.

    But all the memory you allocate has been overwritten from ROM contents - you don't read an arbitrary amount of bytes, just the entire capacity of the ROM and dump that to disk, surely?



  • @Page Table.Com said:

    Imagine you’re writing a Game Boy game, and the resulting ROM with all
    the code and data is just a little over one megabyte in size. No big
    deal, just pad the game to two megabytes, and use a 2 MB ROM in the
    cartridge. Just tell the linker to allocate 2 MB or RAM, put the actual
    data at the beginning, and then write a 2 MB “.gb” image to disk, which
    will then be sent to the ROM chip factory..

    Why pad the game to 2mb?  If you have a large quantity to manafacture this will just slow the production line.  Leave the rest to the ROM chip default.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Helix said:

    @Page Table.Com said:

    Imagine you’re writing a Game Boy game, and the resulting ROM with all
    the code and data is just a little over one megabyte in size. No big
    deal, just pad the game to two megabytes, and use a 2 MB ROM in the
    cartridge. Just tell the linker to allocate 2 MB or RAM, put the actual
    data at the beginning, and then write a 2 MB “.gb” image to disk, which
    will then be sent to the ROM chip factory..

    Why pad the game to 2mb?  If you have a large quantity to manafacture this will just slow the production line.  Leave the rest to the ROM chip default.

    The production code wasn't. The one found with comments was a recompiled decompiled version that had been hacked by someone. From that bastion of all knowledge (yeah, I know):

    http://developers.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=370137&cid=21473097 

    This only applies to a specific Pirate ROM Dump of Zelda DX.


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