Not a wooden table



  • Just got an error report as screenshot pasted in PowerPoint presentation. For me its a first, I get Word files a lot, but never a PPT.

    At least it was not photographed, scanned and faxed.



  • My current top two are:

    2. Screenshot, printed out, marked and scribbled on, scanned, turned into PDF.
    1. Screenshot, printed out, scanned and attached as 600dpi (~5000x7000 px) TIFF (b&w, that is)



  • When you think about it, Power Point is more suiteable than Word. Not that it really matters ;-)



  • @phelyan said:


    2. Screenshot, printed out, marked and scribbled on, scanned, turned into PDF.

     

    I don't have a problem with this one.  I don't have to mess with a fax, and I don't have to mess with the client trying to verbally describe elements of the screenshot in an invariably ambiguous fashion (they can just circle stuff, draw arrows, etc.)

     



  • @emurphy said:

    @phelyan said:


    2. Screenshot, printed out, marked and scribbled on, scanned, turned into PDF.

     

    I don't have a problem with this one.  I don't have to mess with a fax, and I don't have to mess with the client trying to verbally describe elements of the screenshot in an invariably ambiguous fashion (they can just circle stuff, draw arrows, etc.)

     

    They can do that in paint as well. 



  • Once, when I asked for a text stacktrace, I got instead a screenshot of the stacktrace printed to the console  .. taken with a digital camera.  And the photo was too blurry to actually read anything.

    The truly sad part is that the person who sent me the screenshot was working on a PhD in Computer Science.  That WTF is only the tip of the iceberg when it came to that joint project.



  • @SomeGuy said:

    Once, when I asked for a text stacktrace, I got instead a screenshot of the stacktrace printed to the console  .. taken with a digital camera.  And the photo was too blurry to actually read anything.

    The truly sad part is that the person who sent me the screenshot was working on a PhD in Computer Science.

    CS doctorates are almost, but not quite, entirely unrelated to computers. At that level, CS is a branch of applied mathematics, nothing more. There is no doctoral program in software engineering at any university of significance. 



  • @asuffield said:

    @SomeGuy said:

    Once, when I asked for a text stacktrace, I got instead a screenshot of the stacktrace printed to the console  .. taken with a digital camera.  And the photo was too blurry to actually read anything.

    The truly sad part is that the person who sent me the screenshot was working on a PhD in Computer Science.

    CS doctorates are almost, but not quite, entirely unrelated to computers. At that level, CS is a branch of applied mathematics, nothing more. There is no doctoral program in software engineering at any university of significance. 

    I know -- I'm working on a PhD in Computer Science myself.   But is it really too much to expect basic reading comprehension and technical skills out of someone who's going for an advanced degree in a field that uses computers so heavily?

    And like I said, that problem was just the tip of the iceberg.  We were nominally working on a project together, but her portion of the code was so bad that I got permission from both her advisor and mine to scrap her entire portion of the codebase and secretly rewrite it in a separate CVS repository that she didn't have read access to.  (I think the thing that convinced them was when I pointed out all the places where she lifted code from Sun-copyrighted tutorials, deleted the copyright section, and replaced the author name with her own.)



  • @SomeGuy said:

    But is it really too much to expect basic reading comprehension and technical skills out of someone who's going for an advanced degree in a field that uses computers so heavily?

    It's generally too much to expect them to remember to put their trousers on before coming in to the office. 

     

    We were nominally working on a project together, but her portion of the code was so bad that I got permission from both her advisor and mine to scrap her entire portion of the codebase and secretly rewrite it in a separate CVS repository that she didn't have read access to.  (I think the thing that convinced them was when I pointed out all the places where she lifted code from Sun-copyrighted tutorials, deleted the copyright section, and replaced the author name with her own.)

    I'm surprised you had to keep them around at all - that's one of the very small number of things that can get a tenured professor fired, it's more than enough for a graduate student to get kicked out.



  • @asuffield said:

    I'm surprised you had to keep them around at all - that's one of the very small number of things that can get a tenured professor fired, it's more than enough for a graduate student to get kicked out.

    She blamed the undergraduate who assisted her with the project, and her advisor must have believed her.  (This was a cross-university collaboration, so my advisor didn't have much say in what happened to her.)  Personally, I'm not willing to put it past her to do it herself; and at any rate, she shouldn't have signed off on the work by adding the @author field unless she looked the code over first.  There was so much random, unrelated, and unused code in there that was no excuse for not being suspicious.

    Thankfully, people like that get weeded out at my own university early on, so I don't have to deal with them on a daily basis. But as one of my coworkers pointed out: "in the end, her diploma's going to have the same 'PhD' printed on it as ours."


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