Thanks for telling me that



  • i didnt think people did this anymore.. but i was wrong...

     

    http://www.samsungodd.com/eng/liveupdate/

    go there in firefox, or something thats not ie.
     



  • Oh, wow, that's just so 90's.  I didn't read through the site, but it looks fine to me.  Don't know why they would claim that it was optimized for an older browser at such low resolution. BTW, going back to the site does not bring up the error again.  Odd...



  • The worst is that it seems to display perfectly with Firefox on my 1680x1050 monitor.  Including the irritating accelerating "top" button.



    I'm pretty sure it's a Korean thing.   I've heard that IE is very dominant there, something like 99% market share.  Apparently many online Korean banking and shopping sites require the installation of ActiveX plugins.



  • Most banks in Korea have their own proprietry encryption that runs on ActiveX (SSL not good enough?), and therefore has to use IE, they even have problems with Vista -- but who doesn't.



  • The internet proxy from within my employer's intranet simply denies access.

     

    Access Denied

             A problem was encountered analysing the data in the following request or page:
    

    <font color="#0067c6">http://www.samsungodd.com/eng/firmware/faq/faq.asp</font>

    R<font size="-4">esponses for 0 (faq.asp)
    Type: engine Name: Web Engine Action: process-fail
    Description: The system encountered an error while processing the child item.
    Unable to convert the stream from Unicode to .
    The specified character set '30' does not exist.
    The specified character set 'EUC-EN' does not exist.  </font>



  • This is why noscript is god.



  • @yet another Matt said:

    Most banks in Korea have their own proprietry encryption that runs on ActiveX (SSL not good enough?), and therefore has to use IE, they even have problems with Vista -- but who doesn't.
    No, 40 bit ecryption wasn't good enough, which was everything the USA allowed to be exported when SEED was developed. Korea developed SEED because they needed secure encryption and they did it as ActiveX because that was the most useful way of writing web applications with client-side components at that point. And because SEED works as ActiveX Mircosoft continues to own the Korean market and will for the forseeable future.



  • @j6cubic said:

    @yet another Matt said:
    Most banks in Korea have their own proprietry encryption that runs on ActiveX (SSL not good enough?), and therefore has to use IE, they even have problems with Vista -- but who doesn't.
    No, 40 bit ecryption wasn't good enough, which was everything the USA allowed to be exported when SEED was developed. Korea developed SEED because they needed secure encryption and they did it as ActiveX because that was the most useful way of writing web applications with client-side components at that point. And because SEED works as ActiveX Mircosoft continues to own the Korean market and will for the forseeable future.

    Ah, I didn't realise how low it was. Is it true that anything above 128bit encryption is not allowed outside America either?



  • Have they taken down whatever nag message there was?  I don't see it, even with noscript off.

    That stupid 'top' button is right in the center of the page though... 



  • @yet another Matt said:

    @j6cubic said:

    @yet another Matt said:
    Most banks in Korea have their own proprietry encryption that runs on ActiveX (SSL not good enough?), and therefore has to use IE, they even have problems with Vista -- but who doesn't.
    No, 40 bit ecryption wasn't good enough, which was everything the USA allowed to be exported when SEED was developed. Korea developed SEED because they needed secure encryption and they did it as ActiveX because that was the most useful way of writing web applications with client-side components at that point. And because SEED works as ActiveX Mircosoft continues to own the Korean market and will for the forseeable future.

    Ah, I didn't realise how low it was. Is it true that anything above 128bit encryption is not allowed outside America either?

    America doesn't set world policy =P You can't *export* higher level encryption from the US, it still exists. 

     

    Edit:

    There are a few caveats to this iirc. You can't export binaries or source for encryption schemes higher than this, but you *can* send documentation (including complete listings as part of a text document rather than a set of source code)... 



  • This encryption talk reminds me of when I downloaded Netscape 4 ... using Netscape 4.  (Yes, it was only a few years ago, and that may be a WTF.  I'll not explain why I still use it.  Firefox is my primary browser).

    Anyways, I got a big warning about how I couldn't use the product if I was in certain countries because it contained an SSL client.  The weird part was that when I went back to that page in other browsers (including more modern versions of Netscape), I did not get the warning. 



  • @aythun said:

    This is why noscript is god.

    Must be.  The page rendered fine for me.  I'm using noscript as well.   



  • for all of you who cant seem to get this to work:

     

    [img]http://doesthatevencompile.com/random-stuff/of800x600pixel.jpg[/img] 



  • @Kemp said:

    Ah, I didn't realise how low it was. Is it true that anything above 128bit encryption is not allowed outside America either?

    America doesn't set world policy =P You can't export higher level encryption from the US, it still exists. 

    Edit:

    There are a few caveats to this iirc. You can't export binaries or source for encryption schemes higher than this, but you can send documentation (including complete listings as part of a text document rather than a set of source code)... 

    The old rules have been relaxed because they were inconvenient to rich people (and also bloody stupid). Since 1996, you can export software implementing practical encryption algorithms from the US, as long as you notify the relevant branch of the US government about it. There's a warehouse somewhere filled with shelves of notification forms that have been sent in for official ignoring (nobody ever looks at them, so the new rules are still bloody stupid).

    Certain classes of software, notably most free software, have been exempted from the notification requirement due to a brief effort to drown the offending government department in paper by rigorously following the rules (numerous large projects could have generated several hundred notification forms per day).

    Also, the key size limit was 40 bits, not 128 bits.



  • Why on Earth would people brag about turning Javascript off in a thread about a funny Javascript popup?



  • @asuffield said:

    Certain classes of software, notably most free software, have been exempted from the notification requirement due to a brief effort to drown the offending government department in paper by rigorously following the rules (numerous large projects could have generated several hundred notification forms per day).

    So I can't download Netscape in a cron job to inundate the US government with junk?



  • @ChZEROHag said:

    @asuffield said:

    Certain classes of software, notably most free software, have been exempted from the notification requirement due to a brief effort to drown the offending government department in paper by rigorously following the rules (numerous large projects could have generated several hundred notification forms per day).

    So I can't download Netscape in a cron job to inundate the US government with junk?

    I suspect the notification is required whenever the code available to the public CHANGES. For most commercial software public release version, even including betas, are rare. For a Free Software project that allows anonymous checking out from the source control system, then every time a developer commits a change, that would require a new notification. I can believed that could happen many times per day, even more if the devs deliberately commit trivial changes.



  • @yet another Matt said:

    Ah, I didn't realise how low it was. Is it true that anything above 128bit encryption is not allowed outside America either?
    You weren't allowed to export (either as binaries or source) software that implemented encryption stronger than 40bits for a while from the USA (guess why CSS uses 40bit key?). This didn't really stop anybody of course - IIRC, OpenSSL was developed outside of USA, and thus Opera implemented 128bit encryption before the ban was lifted. There was also the case of PGP source, which was printed to paper and exported as such, then scanned and OCRed outside of USA, since there were no restrictions on printed material (IIRC, the PGP version from this printed copy of the source had CKT in the version).



  • @Cap'n Steve said:

    Why on Earth would people brag about turning Javascript off in a thread about a funny Javascript popup?

    Because life on the InterWeb is much nicer when you take control the content, rather than being subjected to annoying web design.  For example, I was not subjected to the funny pop-up dialog; my attention went directly to the site's content.  I didn't think about the layout because it rendered fine outside of their recommendations.

    If 100% of people who published content on the InterWeb spent at least five minutes evaluating their site's design and usability, that would be great.  But such is not the case. 


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