No row with the given identifier exists



  • Well, at least they trapped the error somewhere?  This showed up on http://eqplayers.station.sony.com/items_index.vm .

     

     



  • Pretty good error handling, I'd say.  They could have hidden that row but showing it's there and that an error occurred gives the user a chance to report it. 



  • @purge said:

    Pretty good error handling, I'd say.  They could have hidden that row but showing it's there and that an error occurred gives the user a chance to report it. 

     

    Wouldn't it be more sensible to cut out the middle man by having the application report the error directly to the developer? Exposing internal errors to users in a webapp doesn't strike me as "good error handling".



  • @Nether said:

    Wouldn't it be more sensible to cut out the middle man by having the application report the error directly to the developer? Exposing internal errors to users in a webapp doesn't strike me as "good error handling".

    In most web apps, yes.  But "No row with the given identifier exists" almost seems to fit between "Cobalt Chain Belt Template" and "Elaborate Charm of Spiritual Ferocity."  As strange as EQ terminology is, a "Radiant Stormflow" could very well be an exception. 

      public class Dexterity throws RadiantStormflowException {
    

    }



  • The real WTF is these item names.



  • @seaturnip said:

    The real WTF is these item names.

    The developer was wearing a +3 beanie of lameness when he wrote the item-name-generation routine.



  • What about the fact that the text says "These are the items discovered in the last 24 hours" yet the "discovered date" spans 4 days?  Are the servers in a different reference frame, traveling at a significant fraction of the speed of light (a factor of four rate requires 0.968c)

     

    *I do realize that thing at the bottom could be a link, but it looks like it's describing the contents above. 



  • On a SoE website, that's not a WTF, it's just business as normal.

    I mean we're talking about a company here who have home grown forum software that occasionally corrupts pages in discussions so you can't view them.  Not the whole discussion mind, just the occasional page.  Provided enough people reply to the earlier posts, the thread will eventually expand past the page you can't read and you can carry on reading the posts.

    Their error checking in game consists of bombing the client out to your windows desktop if something unusual happens.  When they shutdown their servers for their regular patches, instead of detecting this on the client and closing gracefully, it bombs out with the message "everquest detected your client may have crashed".  There are errors logged on the discussion boards that affect thousands of players and have been ongoing for over a year.  Now that wouldn't be unusual for some minor glitches, but we're talking about problems like servers crashing daily here...

    So, no, seeing that webpage isn't a WTF for me at all.



  • @myxiplx said:

    On a SoE website, that's not a WTF, it's just business as normal.

    I mean we're talking about a company here who have home grown forum software that occasionally corrupts pages in discussions so you can't view them.  Not the whole discussion mind, just the occasional page.  Provided enough people reply to the earlier posts, the thread will eventually expand past the page you can't read and you can carry on reading the posts.

    Their error checking in game consists of bombing the client out to your windows desktop if something unusual happens.  When they shutdown their servers for their regular patches, instead of detecting this on the client and closing gracefully, it bombs out with the message "everquest detected your client may have crashed".  There are errors logged on the discussion boards that affect thousands of players and have been ongoing for over a year.  Now that wouldn't be unusual for some minor glitches, but we're talking about problems like servers crashing daily here...

    So, no, seeing that webpage isn't a WTF for me at all.

    An abundance of WTFs does not negate the stupidity of any single WTF.



  • @bstorer said:

    An abundance of WTFs does not negate the stupidity of any single WTF.

    No, but it does sufficiently lower your expectations such that: a) you suck it up and live with them, b) you stop using the service, or c) you rejoice at the prospect of someone else having standards lower than your own.  For me, it depends entirely on what I get out of a site/app. 



  • @purge said:

    @Nether said:

    Wouldn't it be more sensible to cut out the middle man by having the application report the error directly to the developer? Exposing internal errors to users in a webapp doesn't strike me as "good error handling".

    In most web apps, yes.  But "No row with the given identifier exists" almost seems to fit between "Cobalt Chain Belt Template" and "Elaborate Charm of Spiritual Ferocity."  As strange as EQ terminology is, a "Radiant Stormflow" could very well be an exception. 

      public class Dexterity throws RadiantStormflowException {

    }

     

    I was hoping to find an action shot of a server being obliterated by a rushing floodgate torrent, but really, sometimes you have to take what google image search can give you.


  • @misguided said:



    Would CRT monitors really float? I guess I've never really thought about it - I mean, that volume of water would be ridiculously heavy, so it'd be lighter than water if airtight - but only the tube itself wouldn't become filled with water.



  • @Random832 said:

    Would CRT monitors really float? I guess I've never really thought about it - I mean, that volume of water would be ridiculously heavy, so it'd be lighter than water if airtight - but only the tube itself wouldn't become filled with water.

    A CRT fundamentally relies on an evacuated glass vessel, so it has to be not only airtight, but capable of withstanding that level of air pressure. If it ever loses integrity, they usually implode quite impressively.

    In water, they'll either float or be crushed by the added pressure (if they go deep enough).



  • @asuffield said:

    @Random832 said:

    Would CRT monitors really float? I guess I've never really thought about it - I mean, that volume of water would be ridiculously heavy, so it'd be lighter than water if airtight - but only the tube itself wouldn't become filled with water.

    A CRT fundamentally relies on an evacuated glass vessel, so it has to be not only airtight, but capable of withstanding that level of air pressure. If it ever loses integrity, they usually implode quite impressively.

    In water, they'll either float or be crushed by the added pressure (if they go deep enough).

    I meant, the case is not airtight, so only the volume of the tube itself would not be filled with water. The question is whether that vacuum (and whatever bits of plastic are lighter than water) provide enough buoyancy for the monitor to float.



  • @Random832 said:

    @asuffield said:
    @Random832 said:

    Would CRT monitors really float? I guess I've never really thought about it - I mean, that volume of water would be ridiculously heavy, so it'd be lighter than water if airtight - but only the tube itself wouldn't become filled with water.

    A CRT fundamentally relies on an evacuated glass vessel, so it has to be not only airtight, but capable of withstanding that level of air pressure. If it ever loses integrity, they usually implode quite impressively.

    In water, they'll either float or be crushed by the added pressure (if they go deep enough).

    I meant, the case is not airtight, so only the volume of the tube itself would not be filled with water. The question is whether that vacuum (and whatever bits of plastic are lighter than water) provide enough buoyancy for the monitor to float.

    The monitor, maybe.

    But Brainiac at least demonstrated it cannot keep people afloat.



  • Simple solution:

    <script type="text/javascript">
    	window.onload=function() {
    			var rows = document.getElementsByTagName("tr");
    			for( var i = 0; i < rows.length; i++ ) {
    				if( rows[i] && rows[i].firstChild && rows[i].firstChild.firstChild && rows[i].firstChild.firstChild.nodeValue.indexOf("No row with the given")==0 ) {
    					rows[i].style.display='none';
    				}
    			}
    		};
    </script>
    ;) 

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