Error Message WTF



  • Since Alex P. has been exposing the absurdity of online banking apps, I have my own WTF to share. 

    I was contracting at a large financial company that was building a web based system that allowed small businesses to pay their payroll and business taxes online.  The site worked like the ASP model Alex described - we hosted the app and the banks would shell out to our site, have the users login, and pay their taxes.  It was way better than the IVR system they had been offering.

    We signed up several banks and got integrated with them.  One bank, however, was of full hand-wringing nail-bitters and constantly wanted extensive input on how the site worked.  Every single thing that we did to the UI was met with stern rebuke and analysis paralysis by this regional bank.  They constantly went through cycles of review, rejection, review, rejection, yada, yada... This went on for years.

    Finally, the bank was ready to do a final round of UAT.  We set up a demo site for them and their steering committee started to hammer away at the app.

    One of the contractors on the team had written an exception handler and it would render various user-friendly messages when an error occurred.  But while he was testing the app, he had to load a bunch of dummy errors to shake things out.  He didn't put much thought into this, because the live app would return the specific, highly detailed error messages from the host system ("You have entered an invalid tax code", "Please select a tax payment type", etc.). 

    So this contractor dummied up the test data with a bunch of highly ironic messages ("Way to go, idiot, you entered the wrong data", "What is your problem!", "Get a clue, loser, and enter the right data" ...yada, yada,yada). We all got a kick out it.

    It wasn't until we started UAT with the bank that we realized that these messages were in the demo database.  An old bat doing testing called and said "Somebody from your company is insulting me on the web site!"

    WTF, we asked?  We scrambled to figure out what she was talking about.  The issue went to the top of the defect list.

    During our weekly defect triage call with all the principles on the project, she elaborated.  "Yes, when I use the tax payment system, and enter the wrong ED-7 code, they guy on the other end would send back this message:  Try again, bimbo.  I am not happy!"  She was fuming.  "How dare he talk to me like that!"



  • Many years ago I mistakenly left a terse "F**K YOU" inside a Flash applet. That was straight to a prospect client, which needless to say I never heard of again.



  • This is just proof that everything in an application should be softcoded for easy future maintenance by the PHBs.



  • Sigh... I did a computer lab once...   It had ASM programming for z80 in it. It was first practice. My partner had more ASM experience so I took the manual looked up whatever he needed, handled the wiring and he did the coding. I did not carefully reread every line of code, because the result worked and we were in a rush to turn it in before the practice ended. I had noticed couple of interesting comments but found the funny. We handed in the report containing the code and left. The next practice our lab teacher praised us of the job well done and then commented that we had a rather rich language leaving drunks and hoes in shame. He read out loud some comments... They were along the lines of "This 8bit piece of sht needs this to work", "Fcking antics to add 16 bit numbers" etc... Needless to say I read and censored the code carefully after that before handing it in...



  • The real WTF is that it would be much easier to type (and debug) "Wrong sort code" or whatever than it is to write "Good job fucksocks, I hope you get face cancer and die".

    So why do developers do this kind of stunt? Because they think it's funny? Because they think they're funny? Just to vent a little?

     

    Either way, it's a bad plan. Just because it's designed as a little joke and will only be seen internally, doesn't mean it will never get out (usually by accident). And clients are normally, very easily offended.

    So don't do it, m'kay?

     



  • ...Or to vent a lot. Sometimes* programming can be quite frustrating.

     I only use informal language when doing "printf debugging". Yeah, yeah, it's a WTF, but sometimes it's easier, specially in interpreted languages like JavaScript.

     
    Anyway, I always leave these lines with no indentation, so I can spot them more easily after I'm done, and it's not infrequent to have a wrapper function just so I can delete it later and then check where it was used.

    Oh, and I never curse, but that's just the type of person I am.

     
    <font size="1">* What's the opposite of an hyperbole?</font>



  • We had an employee create a sample project to send to a customer that created a Registry Entry on their machine called "stupid customer".



  • @Zecc said:

    <FONT size=1>* What's the opposite of an hyperbole?</FONT>

    Hypobole maybe?



  • I worked a short stint travelling and setting up systems that phoned massive numbers of people and delivered messages to them. On one of my first trips, I was to observe a coworker for training. He asked me to record a message along the lines of 'I said press 1 or 2, get it right, asshat' that would be played if someone pressed something otherwise. This would be ok in the context of testing the system as we'd be the only ones hearing it. I stuck with my gut though and just recorded a more amicable, though standard message.

    Good thing, too. He had misconfigured our first test, and upon activation, our system immediately dialed 20 or so high ranking members of the organization the system was being installed for.



  • @MetalPig said:

    @Zecc said:

    <font size="1">* What's the opposite of an hyperbole?</font>

    Hypobole maybe?

    The fact that someone reacted to what I said made me curious for an answer. Here's what I found:

    @FreeDicionary.com said:

    Hypobole

    n. 1. (Rhet.) A figure in which several things are mentioned that seem to make against the argument, or in favor of the opposite side, each of them being refuted in order.

    I never imagined there would actually be a word 'Hypobole', never mind having a completely different meaning.

    @Wikipedia said:

    Meiosis is a figure of speech that intentionally understates something or implies that it is lesser in significance or size than it really is. Meiosis often appears similar to auxesis except that in auxesis, the goal is ironic effect, not a diminished sense of importance.

    Guess we learned something new today, eh?



  • @Zecc said:

    @Wikipedia said:
    Meiosis

    The spelling of that word reminded me of "Old McDonald had a farm". E-I-E-I-O...

    I may be tired. I also still can't figure out how you're supposed to pronounce it. Miosis, Meosis or Maosis?
     



  • @Thief^ said:

    @Zecc said:

    @Wikipedia said:
    Meiosis

    The spelling of that word reminded me of "Old McDonald had a farm". E-I-E-I-O...

    I may be tired. I also still can't figure out how you're supposed to pronounce it. Miosis, Meosis or Maosis?

    I know how to pronounce "Meiosis", but I do not know how to pronounce any of the three non-words you just listed, so I can't help you.



  • @Random832 said:

    @Thief^ said:

    @Zecc said:

    @Wikipedia said:
    Meiosis

    The spelling of that word reminded me of "Old McDonald had a farm". E-I-E-I-O...

    I may be tired. I also still can't figure out how you're supposed to pronounce it. Miosis, Meosis or Maosis?

    I know how to pronounce "Meiosis", but I do not know how to pronounce any of the three non-words you just listed, so I can't help you.

    Oh come on -- work with them.

    me-oh-sis / my-oh-sis / ma-oh-sis

     

    With that said... M-W pronunciation of the word

    TRWTFIT they're using the QuickTime plug-in.
     

     



  • @TunnelRat said:

    ....

    A few years back when i was just starting out my boss told me a story about getting a set of stock images for a billboard campaign.  It was a set of images of people looking happy holding boards with slogans on them. However the one picture with a black dude on it was named "excuus neger" Which translates to "apologetic niger", which is a common toung in cheek racist way of saying that the only reason the guy was chosen was because they needed a coloured person to make the campaign politically correct.

    So since then i always try to make sure that test stuff is at least non-offensive. I don't mind throwing in the occasional wacky test data, (mmm i need some dummy users, let's google greek gods) But especially for non-production error messages i tend to write generic messages like "A error has occured: #415 user module" Which would tell me this error was triggered on line 415 in the file where the user module resides.

    Another trick i recently started doing is setting a defined variable strict in my applications. When it's true i let the application die on every error or possibly incorrect value it can find. Basically read about it in code complete in the chapter about defensive programming. And it works really nice, because when we demo the application i just turn it off and the application will cheerfully ignore all kinds of stuff going wrong, while when i'm testing i can immediately see when the program is screwing up. 
     




  • Something similar happened for the PC Vista release of Halo 2 ([url]http://www.joystiq.com/2007/05/25/halo-2-vista-delayed-because-of-partial-nudity[/url]) I can't find any of the articles now that actually show the "partial nudity" in question, but as I recall it happened when you used the level editor. There was a bug where if you did something wrong then an assertion would fire, the assertion would launch a dialog box with a photo of one of the programmers mooning the camera and a caption along the lines of "Ass-ertion failure" :)

    Stratos, I assume you're Dutch right? When I first moved to Holland it took quite a while for me to convince my colleagues that "Nigger" probably wasn't the best translation to use for the word "Neger" :)
     



  • What word would be more suited? firstly it's the most literal translation, and both words have a negative annotation. Perhaps negro could have been used, but when used by duch as wel as english/american comedians word "neger" and "nigger" have pretty much the same meaning.

     

    -edit-

    This article has the error.
    http://kotaku.com/gaming/coders-gone-wild/esrb-comments-on-halo-2s-naked-ass-263707.php 



  • @stratos said:

    What word would be more suited? firstly it's the most literal translation, and both words have a negative annotation. Perhaps negro could have been used, but when used by duch as wel as english/american comedians word "neger" and "nigger" have pretty much the same meaning.

    Really? I was told that Neger was a fairly acceptable thing to say, lucky you told me before I did so I guess :) I'm still not sure that it's quite as bad as Nigger though. Generally there is so much stigma attached to the word that you should never use it under any circumstances (unless you yourself are black, and even then some of your peers might still get upset). This [url]http://www.theonion.com/content/video/use_of_n_word_may_end_porn_stars[/url] is satire, but it pretty much sums up how upset people can get about it. "Negro" and "Negroid" are considered less offensive, though some people might still have a problem with you saying it.

    Anyways, the safest English translation is simply "Black Person", "Excuus neger" translates to "Token black person". There was a time when the term "African American" was supposed to be used, though that fell out of fashion when alot of black people pointed out that they were:

    a) Not American

    b) Not African either

    The term "coloured" is also fairly safe to use instead of "black".



  • As an aside, my dictionary offers the following translations for Neger:

    black; GESCH. negro [v: negress]; BEL. nigger

    Note for non-dutch speakers:

    GESCH = geschiedenis (historical)

    v = vrouwelijk (feminine)

    BEL = beledigend (offensive/insulting) 



  • I once heard an anecdote involving the term "African-American," which almost surely not true.

    A college professor teaching a Western Civ class was presiding over a debate as to whether Cleopatra was African-American or not. One student stated that he was 100% sure she was NOT. The professor challenged him, asking how he could be so sure.

     The sad thing is that Americans have to think about this for a little while. Non-Americans should have no problem with it.
     



  • @R.Flowers said:

    A college professor teaching a Western Civ class was presiding over a debate as to whether Cleopatra was African-American or not. One student stated that he was 100% sure she was NOT. The professor challenged him, asking how he could be so sure.

     The sad thing is that Americans have to think about this for a little while. Non-Americans should have no problem with it. 

    Well, I for one am pretty sure that Egypt is not in America. 



  • In German, "Neger" also translates to either "negro" or "nigger", depending on who says it when. It's not necessarily offensive, but we observe a common phenomenon here: Whichever word is used to denote a rather unpopular minority group, it becomes "politically incorrect" sooner or later and is replaced by a new, "less offensive" term.



  • I tend to use people's names.
     



  • @dhromed said:

    I tend to use people's names.
     

    I have always found pointing and grunting to be quite effective. 



  • @asuffield said:

    @dhromed said:

    I tend to use people's names.
     

    I have always found pointing and grunting to be quite effective. 

    Well, they're like dogs, see, so while they don't understand the linguistic context, they do respond to the overall sound of their name. I just figure it is more respectful that way.



  • @aib said:

    @Random832 said:
    @Thief^ said:

    @Zecc said:

    @Wikipedia said:
    Meiosis

    I can't figure out how you're supposed to pronounce it. Miosis, Meosis or Maosis?

    I know how to pronounce "Meiosis", but I do not know how to pronounce any of the three non-words you just listed, so I can't help you.

    Oh come on -- work with them.

    me-oh-sis / my-oh-sis / ma-oh-sis

    With that said... M-W pronunciation of the word

    TRWTFIT they're using the QuickTime plug-in.

    my-oh-sis it seems.

    Which I'd personally write as "Miosis" if I'd only ever heard it spoken, but that could just be me. It is a bit of a wtf that in English some letter combinations can be pronounced in vastly different ways. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ei_(digraph)

    @Wikipedia said:

    In English orthography, "ei" can represent many sounds, including the /eɪ/ sound as in rein and vein, the /i/ sound as in seize and receive, and the /aɪ/ sound as in heifer.

    Also known as "A" (ay), "E" (ee) and "e" (eh). And, in Meiosis, /iː/ "I", apparently. No wonder foreigners find the language hard.



  • @Thief^ said:

    my-oh-sis it seems.

    Which I'd personally write as "Miosis" if I'd only ever heard it spoken, but that could just be me. It is a bit of a wtf that in English some letter combinations can be pronounced in vastly different ways. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ei_(digraph)

    @Wikipedia said:

    In English orthography, "ei" can represent many sounds, including the /eɪ/ sound as in rein and vein, the /i/ sound as in seize and receive, and the /aɪ/ sound as in heifer.

    Also known as "A" (ay), "E" (ee) and "e" (eh). And, in Meiosis, /iː/ "I", apparently. No wonder foreigners find the language hard.

    dear
    pearl
    creature
    bread
    creation.

     



  • @dhromed said:

    dear
    pearl
    creature
    bread
    creation.

    Or exhibit B:

    Red == Read (Past Tense)

    Read (Past Tense) != Read (Present Tense)

    Read (Present Tense) == Reed

    The English spelling system is utterly horrible.
     



  • I guess the moral of all these stories is to never type anything that's not intended for others to see. Hell, the last thing I do to an email is address it!

     

    A famous incident in the military organization I was in... some junior officer was writing a document, a very common occurrance in higher headquarters, w/ MS word and was writing some krap about the general to blow off steam. The Jr. officer deleted all that and sent the document up the chain.

     

    Well, word doesn't delete when you delete, really, and every obscenity was still hidden in the document and the target of the screed read it. Well the fit hit the shan for that Jr. officer and the word went out across the entire Air Force about deleting in MS word. 



  • @JoC said:

    I was to observe a coworker for training. He asked me to record a message along the lines of 'I said press 1 or 2, get it right, asshat' that would be played if someone pressed something otherwise.

    You being set up, suckah!

    @JoC said:

    He had misconfigured our first test

    Yeh right, and you believed him? 

    @JoC said:

    upon
    activation, our system immediately dialed 20 or so high ranking members
    of the organization the system was being installed for.

    Dude plays for keeps!  You better watch your back!

     



  • @Devi said:

    The English spelling system is utterly horrible.
     

    In retrospect, borrowing words from every language ever spoken in or near Britain was a bad idea.  Some languages have rules, but not English.  They are more like general suggestions.  Ever wonder why immigrants have trouble learning English?  It's because of the very random spelling/pronunciation of words that native English speakers grow up with and learn to accept.

     
    Skiing?  Does any other English verb use this spelling?  Does any other English word but a diphthong where there are two of the same vowel? (Is this a diphthong?)  Cooperation for one, a pronunciation so confusing that sometimes it is written co-operation.
     



  • @Jetts said:

    diphthong .. diphthong?.

    Props for using the word diphthong.  I love that word.

    I never would have known that there was an h in the word if Firefox hadn't corrected me while I was typing this post. 



  • @Jetts said:

    @Devi said:

    The English spelling system is utterly horrible.
     

    In retrospect, borrowing words from every language ever spoken in or near Britain was a bad idea.  Some languages have rules, but not English.  They are more like general suggestions.  Ever wonder why immigrants have trouble learning English?  It's because of the very random spelling/pronunciation of words that native English speakers grow up with and learn to accept.

     
    Skiing?  Does any other English verb use this spelling?  Does any other English word but a diphthong where there are two of the same vowel? (Is this a diphthong?)  Cooperation for one, a pronunciation so confusing that sometimes it is written co-operation.
     

    Actually, they are, specifically, _not_ diphthongs - two vowels of any kind next to each other is a diphthong by default, having them be separate vowels is the exception. Traditionally this was written with a diaeresis, so you'd have e.g. “skiïng”. “coöperation” was actually used.



  • @Jetts said:

    @Devi said:

    The English spelling system is utterly horrible.

    In retrospect, borrowing words from every language ever spoken in or near Britain was a bad idea.

    It wasn't an idea at all, it just happened. It's not just the words, anyway - English didn't develop by grabbing words from other languages, it developed by all those people coming to England and breeding together. When the father speaks only Norse and the mother speaks only Celtic, you shouldn't expect the children to speak a very sensible language.

     

    Some languages have rules, but not English.  They are more like general suggestions.  Ever wonder why immigrants have trouble learning English?  It's because of the very random spelling/pronunciation of words that native English speakers grow up with and learn to accept.

    To be fair, there are very few languages which are significantly better, and they're mostly quite obscure.



  • @asuffield said:

    To be fair, there are very few languages which are significantly better, and they're mostly quite obscure.

    Can one speak Ruby? 



  • @Jetts said:

    In retrospect, borrowing words from every language ever spoken in or near Britain was a bad idea.  Some languages have rules, but not English.  They are more like general suggestions.  Ever wonder why immigrants have trouble learning English?  It's because of the very random spelling/pronunciation of words that native English speakers grow up with and learn to accept.

     
    Skiing?  Does any other English verb use this spelling?  Does any other English word but a diphthong where there are two of the same vowel? (Is this a diphthong?)  Cooperation for one, a pronunciation so confusing that sometimes it is written co-operation.
     

    On the other hand, many other languages (e.g. German) borrow many English words and still do so. Even English words unknown to native speakers, e.g. "Handy" which means "cell phone".

    In direct comparison with German, English seems very regular to me. In English, "he" means a male, "she" means an female and "it" means a child, baby or thing. Not so in German. "Er" means a male or a thing, "Sie" means a female or a thing or "they" or "them", "Es" means a thing or a girl. In English, there are a few hundred irregular verbs. In German, the concept is not known, since there are no regular verbs.

    And don't even get me started about Polish.



  • @asuffield said:

    @Jetts said:

    Some languages have rules, but not English.  They are more like general suggestions.  Ever wonder why immigrants have trouble learning English?  It's because of the very random spelling/pronunciation of words that native English speakers grow up with and learn to accept.

    To be fair, there are very few languages which are significantly better, and they're mostly quite obscure.

    While many other languages do have strange grammar rules, etc, just as English does, I think there are at least a few quite well-known ones that have much better spelling/pronunciation rules. (Note, though, that this is only necessarily helpful when learning to read and write in them, or learning to speak and understand while already knowing how to read and write)



  • @ammoQ said:

    On the other hand, many other languages (e.g. German) borrow many English words and still do so. Even English words unknown to native speakers, e.g. "Handy" which means "cell phone".

    Don't forget the hilarity that ensues when people inflect English words using German grammar rules and prefixes...

    "Yo, warte kurz, bis ich die Fotos von meinem Handy gedownloaded habe..."



  • "...guy on the other end would send back this message"

    You know... Users believing this could explain a lot.
     



  • Yeah, she actually thought the web page has someone on the other end typing messages back to her.

    Open the pod bay door , HAL...

     



  • @PSWorx said:

    "Yo, warte kurz, bis ich die Fotos von meinem Handy gedownloaded habe..."

    Isn't that "downgeloadet"? Anyway, my all-time favourite Denglish word is "Saalvoting" from the TV show "Starmania" (the Austrian version of "Idol", "DSDS" etc.) 


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Jetts said:

     
    Skiing?  Does any other English verb use this spelling?  Does any other English word but a diphthong where there are two of the same vowel? (Is this a diphthong?)  Cooperation for one, a pronunciation so confusing that sometimes it is written co-operation.
     

    Bookkeeping

    Three doubles there, two of which are vowels. No diphthongs however. Have fun.



  • @Jetts said:

    In retrospect, borrowing words from every language ever spoken in or near Britain was a bad idea.  Some languages have rules, but not English.  They are more like general suggestions.  Ever wonder why immigrants have trouble learning English?  It's because of the very random spelling/pronunciation of words that native English speakers grow up with and learn to accept.

    To be honest, I know several people who have gone and taught English in other countries. All say that their students find it easier to learn English as a second language than any other language, and also some say that their students say it's actually easier to learn than their own native language.

    Yes, the spelling is sometimes bizarre - but not as often as you sometimes think. But, spelling isn't all there is to a language. English often has much more relaxed grammatic rules for intelligibility than other languages. There's very little reliance on object gender, most verb conjugations are regular and very simple compared with other languages etc (for a regular verb, eg 'walk' see how many forms this can be conjugated to in English (walk, walks, walking, walked) compared to French (I make it 33 different ways))

    In a way, the fact that English HAS got its roots in many varied and different languages has sort of 'averaged' it out to get rid of the tricky bits in other languages.



  • @pscs said:


    To be honest, I know several people who have gone and taught English in other countries. All say that their students find it easier to learn English as a second language than any other language, and also some say that their students say it's actually easier to learn than their own native language.

     

    To say, I'm Brazilian and find English to be WAY easier than Portuguese. Portuguese has too much junk which is not really used in everyday speech, only in literature.



  • @PJH said:

    @Jetts said:

     
    Skiing?  Does any other English verb use this spelling?  Does any other English word but a diphthong where there are two of the same vowel? (Is this a diphthong?)  Cooperation for one, a pronunciation so confusing that sometimes it is written co-operation.
     

    Bookkeeping

    Three doubles there, two of which are vowels. No diphthongs however. Have fun.

     

    I pronounce it with two k's, doesn't everyone?  Actually I do pronounce it like that silently to myself, and I laugh.  Another of my favorite double consonants is 'fish ship'.  Now, if you say that around me and I laugh, you will know why.  You will probably still think I am really weird, but at least you'll know.

     



  • @Renan_S2 said:

    @pscs said:


    To be honest, I know several people who have gone and taught English in other countries. All say that their students find it easier to learn English as a second language than any other language, and also some say that their students say it's actually easier to learn than their own native language.



    To say, I'm Brazilian and find English to be WAY easier than Portuguese. Portuguese has too much junk which is not really used in everyday speech, only in literature.

    Prithee, young one, who art thou, and what has ailed thy mother to bedizen thee in this strange fashion?

     


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Jetts said:

    @PJH said:
    @Jetts said:
    Skiing?  Does any other English verb use this spelling?  Does any other English word but a diphthong where there are two of the same vowel? (Is this a diphthong?)  Cooperation for one, a pronunciation so confusing that sometimes it is written co-operation.

     

    Bookkeeping

    Three doubles there, two of which are vowels. No diphthongs however. Have fun.

    I pronounce it with two k's, doesn't everyone?
     

    Um, no.



  • The OED only has book-keeping, hyphenated, which makes it pretty clear that the two k's are articulated seperately.  Earliest citation 1689.

    Also try figuring out the pronunciation of this one: 

    Rough-coated, dough-faced, thoughtful ploughman John
    Gough strode through the streets of Loughborough; after sloughing off some skin near the lough (dry
    due to drought), he coughed and hiccoughed, then washed up in a trough from Slough.
     


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @m0ffx said:

    The OED only has book-keeping, hyphenated, which makes it pretty clear that the two k's are articulated seperately.  Earliest citation 1689.

    There's a difference between whether it should be and whether it is. Merriam Webster doesn't hyphenate it.

    Anyway, haven't we already had threads about the changing nature of the language?

    Also try figuring out the pronunciation of this one: 

    Rough-coated, dough-faced, thoughtful ploughman John
    Gough strode through the streets of Loughborough; after sloughing off some skin near the lough (dry
    due to drought), he coughed and hiccoughed, then washed up in a trough from Slough.
     

    I thought the surname was Featherstonehaugh.



  • @PJH said:

    @m0ffx said:

    The OED only has book-keeping, hyphenated, which makes it pretty clear that the two k's are articulated seperately.  Earliest citation 1689.

    There's a difference between whether it should be and whether it is. Merriam Webster doesn't hyphenate it.

    Anyway, haven't we already had threads about the changing nature of the language?

    Also try figuring out the pronunciation of this one: 

    Rough-coated, dough-faced, thoughtful ploughman John
    Gough strode through the streets of Loughborough; after sloughing off some skin near the lough (dry
    due to drought), he coughed and hiccoughed, then washed up in a trough from Slough.
     

    I thought the surname was Featherstonehaugh.

    I can't know how the pronounce the names.

    Gough coughd be gou or goo, baught Igh refreighn fraughm seighing Goof beicaughs Igh considegh it thegh exceptiaughn.



  • @m0ffx said:

    The OED only has book-keeping, hyphenated, which makes it pretty clear that the two k's are articulated seperately.

    Well... that depends on what exactly "articulated separately" means. A plosive consonant can be realized, in normal speech as either a stop of airflow at a particular location in the mouth, or a sudden start of airflow at that location (at the start of a sentence, there will have been no distinct stop beforehand, rather the mouth is positioned for it before articulation begins). Generally, at least mid-word between vowels, they are realized as an interruption (i.e., stop, then restart) with no delay - whereas - when I pronounce "bookkeeping", there is a distinct pause between the "stop" and the "start", which can thus be interpreted as two distinct consonant sounds (particularly given that the syllable break for hyphenation is traditionally placed between the two "k"s)


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