Those pesky query string parameters should better stay put...



  • One of my duties was to finish and maintain an application developed around 80% by somebody else. One of the pearls encountered in the code is this:


    //if-else put here. Sometimes Querystring[2] is needed.
    //other times it is QueryString[0].  Not sure why...  
    string id;
    if (Request.QueryString.Count == 1) {
      //id = Request.QueryString[0];
      id = Request.QueryString[1];
    } else {
      id = Request.QueryString[2];
    }



  • @rslite said:

    One of my duties was to finish and maintain an application developed around 80% by somebody else. One of the pearls encountered in the code is this:


    //if-else put here. Sometimes Querystring[2] is needed.
    //other times it is QueryString[0].  Not sure why...  
    string id;
    if (Request.QueryString.Count == 1) {
      //id = Request.QueryString[0];
      id = Request.QueryString[1];
    } else {
      id = Request.QueryString[2];
    }
    Why can't those lazy web developers put their query parameters in the exact same order every time?! 


  • @rslite said:

    One of my duties was to finish and maintain an application developed around 80% by somebody else. One of the pearls encountered in the code is this:


    //if-else put here. Sometimes Querystring[2] is needed.
    //other times it is QueryString[0].  Not sure why...  
    string id;
    if (Request.QueryString.Count == 1) {
      //id = Request.QueryString[0];
      id = Request.QueryString[1];
    } else {
      id = Request.QueryString[2];
    }

    I especially like how he never used QueryString[0], despite what the comment says. :D


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    Request.QueryString[ "paramName" ] was just too complicated.



  • @rslite said:

    One of my duties was to finish and maintain an application developed around 80% by somebody else. One of the pearls encountered in the code is this:


    //if-else put here. Sometimes Querystring[2] is needed.
    //other times it is QueryString[0].  Not sure why...  
    string id;
    if (Request.QueryString.Count == 1) {
      //id = Request.QueryString[0];
      id = Request.QueryString[1];
    } else {
      id = Request.QueryString[2];
    }

     

    Um does .Count return 0 if there is 1 object? (thats another WTF)

     Notice that [1] is used if there is 1 result ([0] should be used) and [2] is used if it is not == 1... what if its == 0? Man too much logic, i think ill just turn on the stove and choose the id that my teapot whistles out!

     



  • @dlikhten said:

    @rslite said:
    One of my duties was to finish and maintain an application developed around 80% by somebody else. One of the pearls encountered in the code is this:


    //if-else put here. Sometimes Querystring[2] is needed.
    //other times it is QueryString[0].  Not sure why...  
    string id;
    if (Request.QueryString.Count == 1) {
      //id = Request.QueryString[0];
      id = Request.QueryString[1];
    } else {
      id = Request.QueryString[2];
    }

    Um does .Count return 0 if there is 1 object? (thats another WTF)

     Notice that [1] is used if there is 1 result ([0] should be used) and [2] is used if it is not == 1... what if its == 0? Man too much logic, i think ill just turn on the stove and choose the id that my teapot whistles out!

    This thing is a great example of a bad understanding of both binary logic and causation vs. correlation. 



  • Um, whatever that means.  Everyone missed the obvious solution:

    id = Request.QueryString[random.next(0,3)]; 

    </sarcasm>


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