HTML help



  • I can't figure out why HTML is not listening to me.

    Can someone look at the table at <a href="http://ekupride.x10hosting.com/">http://ekupride.x10hosting.com/</a>.

    It's not listening to me for some reason. First of when I put the table width to 100% it only goes about 1/2 the way across the container. Then if I try to align it with paragraph tags, it ignores them. I'm testing it in firefox so, it should look right if my HTML is right. I don't think the forum can display code very well so I'll let you all look at the source when you get to the page.

     

    Any help is appreciated.

     

    Malfist (back to webdesign, gah, I hate it)
     



  • Download Firebug for Firefox - you can "inspect" any element of your site and dynamically modify the HTML and CSS.  Very handy.

    Your #content div has a max-width of 36em, delete this.  Your table width is set to 75%, set it to 100%. 

    It's invalid HTML to put a block level element inside an inline element - ie a TABLE inside a P.  Try a DIV instead. 



  • Since your table has only one row, couldn't you better replace it with a CSS-styled list? (<ol> or something)



  • It may at some point have more than one row so, I'm keeping as is for the time being.

     

    Thanks for the CSS tip, I was lazy and didn't feel like writing one, so I grabbed it off the web. It was the better of the three I saw, I'll look through it and see if there are anymore WTF's in it. 

     

    I have firebug. 



  • http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/
    http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/

    but before that, open up your favourite pixel pushing program and make a design. Because your site looks like shit, and that's just the nice way of saying it.
    Good designs don't "just happen" along the way, you start of with a good design and from that you decide how to layout your html, then you put styles to those elements to re-create your design. 

     

     



  • @stratos said:

    but before that, open up your favourite pixel pushing program and make a design. Because your site looks like shit, and that's just the nice way of saying it.

    This appears to be a site about/for/by gay people

    If there is one thing I have learned from TV, it is that gay people are
    far superior to the rest of us concerning design, colors, etc.
    So this could be an early view of how the next fashion in web design is going to be.


    (Just joking)
     



  • Let's not chastize a man for not being skilled in an area.

    The design has "programmer" written all over it.

    By "all over it" I mean, "between the pixels".
     



  • @dhromed said:

    Let's not chastize a man for not being skilled in an area.

    Why not? That's pretty much what we're here to do. 



  • When they (should be | claim to be), I mean.



  • I wasn't trying to be a ass, and i didn't try to offend him or anything, it's just that his design looked like shit. And it's my opinion that you shouldn't really be bothering with good HTML/bad HTML. If your design is shit anyway. I mean, what's the use, you don't have the faintest idea what should be put where or how it should be grouped, and basically just thinking up stuff as you go along. That's like starting to write a program without knowing what the program should do.

     



  • @stratos said:

    Good designs don't "just happen" along the way, you start of with a good design and from that you decide how to layout your html, then you put styles to those elements to re-create your design.

    You completely forgot the step wherein you warp your nice, clean design into a twisted monstrosity in order to accommodate five different browser versions, none of which agree on even the simplest features of CSS, mostly because the CSS specs were flawed from the beginning.  And then there's the Javascript...



  • I disagree, although it's certainly true that browsers have there own little quirks, with a bit of experience on how to solve these things it's pretty easy to implement 90% of all the designs you will ever get thrown at you.

    Just as long as you can convince the designer that pixel precise and text don't go so well on the web, and that some choices will have to be made about the last 10%, where you have to choose between changing the design a bit, or breaking cross-browser pixel precise rendering. (that it looks exactly the same in all browsers)

    Javascript isn't that bad really, it's just that if you don't know how it works it can be tricky. Also i hardly ever use vanilla JS any more, i've fallen in love with Jquery, which is a excellent way to get some cross-browser support for JS.

    CSS well the trick with CSS is i think that you have to understand how they wanted it to work, and how you have to use it to get it to do what you want. The biggest problem i see with people is that they don't try to lookup what stuff does and just keep adding cruft and hitting F5 to see if it works, then when it works in browser A, they look in browser B and see it's a mess and blame the browser and css, instead of looking up how the stuff actually works, and interacts.

    But of course the biggest part of it is just knowing all those tiny things from different browsers and how they differ, and how to fix them.



  • Look, I'm a programmer, not a fashion major. I haven't the faintest clue about what colors go with which colors, and I don't care really about the layout.

    The layout only needs to be something easy, it looks like crap right now because, first of, it's not finished, second off, I'm more concerned about internals. If the club/organization thinks my design is shit, I'll be happy to change it for the first two or three times.

    I may be gay but I'm not camp (no floppy wrists, no girly attitude, just a normal (well, as normal as a programmer can be) guy who happens to also like guys), I generally detest camp gays, but that's their right. 



  • @stratos said:

    I disagree, although it's certainly true that browsers have there own little quirks, with a bit of experience on how to solve these things it's pretty easy to implement 90% of all the designs you will ever get thrown at you.

    Just as long as you can convince the designer that pixel precise and text don't go so well on the web, and that some choices will have to be made about the last 10%, where you have to choose between changing the design a bit, or breaking cross-browser pixel precise rendering. (that it looks exactly the same in all browsers)

    The bigger issue now is CSS.

    Javascript isn't that bad really, it's just that if you don't know how it works it can be tricky. Also i hardly ever use vanilla JS any more, i've fallen in love with Jquery, which is a excellent way to get some cross-browser support for JS.

    It's Prototype for me.

    CSS well the trick with CSS is i think that you have to understand how they wanted it to work, and how you have to use it to get it to do what you want. The biggest problem i see with people is that they don't try to lookup what stuff does and just keep adding cruft and hitting F5 to see if it works, then when it works in browser A, they look in browser B and see it's a mess and blame the browser and css, instead of looking up how the stuff actually works, and interacts.

    But there are two problems: 1) Things don't always work and interact in ways that make sense in practice 2) The browsers don't all agree on how to interpret (or even whether to implement) things. 

    But of course the biggest part of it is just knowing all those tiny things from different browsers and how they differ, and how to fix them.

    Exactly.
     



  • Hey there, I live in western Kentucky, and a fairly recent graduate of WKU (although not "college age," if that even means anything anymore).

    As you say, you are concerned with functionality at the moment. When you are ready for a slightly snappier layout, why not try an open source web design?

         http://www.oswd.org/

        http://www.openwebdesign.org/

    A little modification can make it all yours. 



  • I recommend getting a nice static HTML/CSS cross-browser complient template from www.templatemonster.com,  For $65 dollars, you get a clean look and feel and can save yourself the agony.  Then you can focus on your content.  FYI, purple and green are not on the same part of the color wheel.

    I'll even do this pro-bono, as long as your ISP supports ASP.NET and SQL-Server (it is the easiest may to get membership integrated).

    Also, all you need is a forum, so you can use CommunityServer, just like this site.  Don't reinvent the wheel, unless this is a class project.  CS is free, and I can set it up for you. 

    And its not nice for all these pinheads to dis you on your technique, you're just learning. 

     

     



  • I don't think x10hosting supports ASP, they might, what the support for free is amazing to me. I don't really want to pay for a layout, that's why it's on free hosting and I'm the only developer. (It's not purple, its blue, gray and green (I don't like the green but everyone else said 'It's fine' and wouldn't help)) I might check out the OSS stuff.

     My main concern with going with PHPBB and CommunityServer is I know PHPBB isn't secure, and I don't want to deal with spam. Although this site doesn't have spam, I don't want to deal with the fancy captcha's, I've got a simple math one that I'm using. Another reason why I want to do my own is, I'm learning. I'm not the greatest with SQL and PHP, although I can do both, I want to learn them better.
     


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