Wash hands after handling



  • The instruction manual of a new Linksys phone includes the following disclaimer:

    WARNING: This product contains chemicals, including lead, known to the State of California to cause cancer, and birth defects or other reproductive harm. Wash hands after handling.

     Firstly, I don't give a hoot about what the State of California thinks, and secondly, it's a phone so I'm probably going to be handling it fairly often!



  • @Duncan said:

    WARNING: This product contains chemicals, including lead, known to the State of California to cause cancer, and birth defects or other reproductive harm. 


    Unfortunately, the above phrase is required to be stamped on every single thing in the state of California. My guess is that manufacturers just put it on everything regardless of where it's being sold because it costs less to do that. It makes the point of the warning completely useless. For example, here in Los Angeles, every single building has a sign with that sentence on it. How is this helping us?



  • California requires this warning.  It doesn't seem to matter that the lead is permanently interned in the phone (in the solder holding the components to the circuit board, to be specific).  All electronics have this warning now.

     



  • @dcardani said:

    For example, here in Los Angeles, every single building has a sign with that sentence on it.

    Does that mean you should wash your hands everytime you go anywhere?



  • In the same area, i'm trying to guess what's in my Garmin GPS:

     

    Warning: this product, its packaging, and its components contain chemicals known to the State of california to cause cancer, birth defect, or reproductive harm. This notice is being provided in accordance with California's Proposition 65. If you have any questions or would like additional information, please refer to our Web site at http://www.garmin.com/prop65/

     



  • @dcardani said:

    @Duncan said:

    WARNING: This product contains chemicals, including lead, known to the State of California to cause cancer, and birth defects or other reproductive harm. 


    Unfortunately, the above phrase is required to be stamped on every single thing in the state of California. My guess is that manufacturers just put it on everything regardless of where it's being sold because it costs less to do that. It makes the point of the warning completely useless. For example, here in Los Angeles, every single building has a sign with that sentence on it. How is this helping us?

     

    More fun facts: 

    The state of Kansas is the only state with a law that says if a coupon lists a value to be taken off of a product, then the consumer is allowed to ask for that value in cash without actually making a purchase.  That's why your coupons for "$1 off Big Mac" also say "Cash value 0.00000001 Lira": It gets around the Kansas law and it's cheaper to print that one coupon for all states than to print one coupon for Kansas and another for the other 49 states.



  • Hmmm... what happens if the faucet contains lead?



  • @Zecc said:

    @dcardani said:

    For example, here in Los Angeles, every single building has a sign with that sentence on it.

    Does that mean you should wash your hands everytime you go anywhere?

    Yes, except for the bathroom, because I'm smart enough not to piss on myself. 



  • @KattMan said:

    @Zecc said:

    @dcardani said:

    For example, here in Los Angeles, every single building has a sign with that sentence on it.

    Does that mean you should wash your hands everytime you go anywhere?

    Yes, except for the bathroom, because I'm smart enough not to piss on myself. 

    That's... troubling. Do you honestly believe that the only reason anyone washes their hands is because they've just pissed all over them? 



  • @sootzoo said:

    @KattMan said:
    @Zecc said:

    @dcardani said:

    For example, here in Los Angeles, every single building has a sign with that sentence on it.

    Does that mean you should wash your hands everytime you go anywhere?

    Yes, except for the bathroom, because I'm smart enough not to piss on myself. 

    That's... troubling. Do you honestly believe that the only reason anyone washes their hands is because they've just pissed all over them? 

    Perhaps, or more likely your sarcasm meter is broken. 



  • It could get worse, they could go out of the way to ban water someday.



  • [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"]It could get worse, they could go out of the way to ban water someday.[/quote]

    Hmmm...

    "Quantities of  dihydrogen monoxide have been found in almost every stream, lake, and reservoir in America today."

    Ok I want to know, what is in the other streams, lakes, and reservoirs that DHMO is not found in. 



  • @KattMan said:

    [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"]It could get worse, they could go out of the way to ban water someday.

    Hmmm...

    "Quantities of  dihydrogen monoxide have been found in almost every stream, lake, and reservoir in America today."

    Ok I want to know, what is in the other streams, lakes, and reservoirs that DHMO is not found in.[/quote]

    Mostly dirt. 



  • @KattMan said:

    @sootzoo said:
    @KattMan said:
    @Zecc said:

    @dcardani said:

    For example, here in Los Angeles, every single building has a sign with that sentence on it.

    Does that mean you should wash your hands everytime you go anywhere?

    Yes, except for the bathroom, because I'm smart enough not to piss on myself. 

    That's... troubling. Do you honestly believe that the only reason anyone washes their hands is because they've just pissed all over them? 

    Perhaps, or more likely your sarcasm meter is broken. 

    That seems to be a common problem around here. 



  • WARNING: This product contains chemicals, including lead, known to the State of California to cause cancer, and birth defects or other reproductive harm. Wash hands after handling.

    Wow, that's neat! I can wash my hands and get rid of cancer and birth defects. Does the Mayo Institute know about this?

    -dZ.


  • @KattMan said:

    [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"]It could get worse, they could go out of the way to ban water someday.

    Hmmm...

    "Quantities of  dihydrogen monoxide have been found in almost every stream, lake, and reservoir in America today."

    Ok I want to know, what is in the other streams, lakes, and reservoirs that DHMO is not found in. 

    [/quote]

    Oh, come on, you just have to open your eyes... there are lava streams for example, or if you got the right volcano maybe an acid pool... Or you travel to Antarctica and bask yourself in the beauty of a liquid oxygen lake.

    You see, the possibilities to experience pure, unpolluted nature are almost endless...



  • I can only guess. Californians need to be reminded to wash there hands every now and then? ducks
     


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @bstorer said:

    @KattMan said:

    [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"]It could get worse, they could go out of the way to ban water someday.

    Hmmm...

    "Quantities of  dihydrogen monoxide have been found in almost every stream, lake, and reservoir in America today."

    Ok I want to know, what is in the other streams, lakes, and reservoirs that DHMO is not found in.

    Mostly dirt. 

    [/quote] And condoms, tampons, q-tips, the occasional bit of faeces....



  • It gets even better. The last time I bought a Toslink cable (optical audio), it too had the silly California lead sticker. Never mind that an optical cable is a clear plastic strand with an opaque plastic cover. No metal of any sort, so uhm, where's the lead? I want my damn lead! It says right here this product contains it...

     



  • @IHateEverybody said:

    It gets even better. The last time I bought a Toslink cable (optical audio), it too had the silly California lead sticker. Never mind that an optical cable is a clear plastic strand with an opaque plastic cover. No metal of any sort, so uhm, where's the lead? I want my damn lead! It says right here this product contains it...

     

    I think it may be used in the casing. I think I saw a toaster with the same warning, and they referred specifically to the power cable. I can't imagine there's that much lead on a power cable (certainly not much inside it). 



  • @HitScan said:

    I think it may be used in the casing. I think I saw a toaster with the same warning, and they referred specifically to the power cable. I can't imagine there's that much lead on a power cable (certainly not much inside it). 

    There's lead in most solder. It's probably a solder connection rather than a screw one. 



  • @IHateEverybody said:

    It gets even better. The last time I bought a Toslink cable (optical audio), it too had the silly California lead sticker. Never mind that an optical cable is a clear plastic strand with an opaque plastic cover. No metal of any sort, so uhm, where's the lead? I want my damn lead! It says right here this product contains it...


    The cover plastic may contain dissolved lead; alternatively, if the "clear plastic strand" is actually glass, it's probably got a goodly amount of lead in it.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.