Java packets you should know and use



  • http://digg.com/programming/Java_packets_you_should_know_and_use

    Perhaps he meant 'packages that you should know and use'.. and perhaps he should know what they as well.



  • Bonus: if you read the page, it doesn't list java.util as one of the "main and most commonly used java packets".



  • The digg link is to a blog post. The poster is a 22 year old grecian who is studying IT! Oh boy!

    Here is a list of the main and most commonly used java packages. Packages are imported using import <packet name>;, for example import java.net;

    • java.applet: includes class Applet and other methods that allow applet creation. javax.swing.JApplet is used when an applet enhances GUI swing components
    • java.io: includes classes for data input and output
    • java.net: includes classes for network programming like socket and datagram programming.
    • java.rmi: incudes classes and methods for creating applications for distributed computing.
    • java.security: includes classes for authorisation and data encryption.
    • javax.swing: incudes classes for GUI.
    • java.sql: incudes classes for connection with SQL databases.

    Wow, real nice. I bet he's just translating his professor's notes, too, and passing them off as pearls of wisdom.



  • @bstorer said:

    Bonus: if you read the page, it doesn't list java.util as one of the "main and most commonly used java packets".

    granted you do not have to import it, I tend to rely heavily on java.lang ;)



  • Bonus: He's nominated himself as the Best Foreign Language blog in the Blogger Awards

    He has four votes. One of which is his.



  • @Vechni said:

    http://digg.com/programming/Java_packets_you_should_know_and_use

    Perhaps he meant 'packages that you should know and use'.. and perhaps he should know what they as well.

    This is quite common, and irritates me on a regular basis. The problem is that in the Germanic languages, "package" and "packet" are the same word, so most Germans (and related foreigners) are clueless about which to use.



  • @asuffield said:

    This is quite common, and irritates me on a regular basis. The problem is that in the Germanic languages, "package" and "packet" are the same word, so most Germans (and related foreigners) are clueless about which to use.

    Same in Portuguese (which is a Latin language).

    "pacote" can mean both "package" and "packet". It causes some trouble when doing translation from Portuguese to English.



  • @asuffield said:

    @Vechni said:

    http://digg.com/programming/Java_packets_you_should_know_and_use

    Perhaps he meant 'packages that you should know and use'.. and perhaps he should know what they as well.

    This is quite common, and irritates me on a regular basis. The problem is that in the Germanic languages, "package" and "packet" are the same word, so most Germans (and related foreigners) are clueless about which to use.

     English is a Germanic language, West Germanic to be exact. So not all Germanic languages has this "problem".

     



  • the german word 'paket' has three meanings... packet, package and parcel :)



  • @mabr said:

    @asuffield said:
    @Vechni said:

    http://digg.com/programming/Java_packets_you_should_know_and_use

    Perhaps he meant 'packages that you should know and use'.. and perhaps he should know what they as well.

    This is quite common, and irritates me on a regular basis. The problem is that in the Germanic languages, "package" and "packet" are the same word, so most Germans (and related foreigners) are clueless about which to use.

     English is a Germanic language, West Germanic to be exact. So not all Germanic languages has this "problem".

    The english grammar is Germanic, but a very large part of the english vocabulary is Romantic.



  • @dphunct said:

    @bstorer said:

    Bonus: if you read the page, it doesn't list java.util as one of the "main and most commonly used java packets".

    granted you do not have to import it, I tend to rely heavily on java.lang ;)

    Yeah, I noticed that, too. But in his defense, he probably doesn't even realize java.lang exists.


  • @mabr said:

    English is a Germanic language, West Germanic to be exact. So not all Germanic languages has this "problem".

    English may be Germanic grammatically (despite using a West Romance form for plural nouns), but about half the words in English are from [an old dialect of] French. The other half are from [an old dialect of] German. And the third half are from miscellaneous other languages.



  • @Random832 said:

    @mabr said:

    English is a Germanic language, West Germanic to be exact. So not all Germanic languages has this "problem".

    English may be Germanic grammatically (despite using a West Romance form for plural nouns), but about half the words in English are from [an old dialect of] French. The other half are from [an old dialect of] German. And the third half are from miscellaneous other languages.

    English:  More of a language than yours:  We have three halves of a language! 

    I'm lovin it
     



  • @belgariontheking said:

    English:  More of a language than yours:  We have three halves of a language! 

    The joke’s not funny when you explain it. And I was talking about the size of the vocabulary, not the language per se.



  • @dphunct said:

    @mabr said:
    @asuffield said:
    @Vechni said:

    http://digg.com/programming/Java_packets_you_should_know_and_use
    Perhaps he meant 'packages that you should know and use'.. and perhaps he should know what they as well.

    This is quite common, and irritates me on a regular basis. The problem is that in the Germanic languages, "package" and "packet" are the same word, so most Germans (and related foreigners) are clueless about which to use.

     English is a Germanic language, West Germanic to be exact. So not all Germanic languages has this "problem".

    The english grammar is Germanic, but a very large part of the english vocabulary is Romantic.

    Also, Greek is not an Germanic language anyway.  Of course, I don't know a lick of Greek (it's all Greek to me.  Haha!), so I have no idea if the same thing holds.  I'm just picking nits.



  • @betlit said:

    the german word 'paket' has three meanings... packet, package and parcel :)


    In English, outside of technical jargon, there's not much of a difference in the meaning of those 3 words anyway.



  • Shouldn't the Java keyword "package" give him a bit of a hint as to which is correct?



  • @ThePants999 said:

    Shouldn't the Java keyword "package" give him a bit of a hint as to which is correct?

    To try to comprehend the minds of idiots is to follow the road that leads only to madness.



  • @ThePants999 said:

    Shouldn't the Java keyword "package" give him a bit of a hint as to which is correct?

    Only if you realise that one is correct and one isn't.  As a counter example, "catch" is a Java keyword and "trap" isn't, but that doesn't mean that the phrase "trapping an exception" is wrong when talking about Java, just somewhat unconventional.


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