Japan Invents a 26-Hour Work Day





  • If I'm reading that right, they found a way for me to drink for an extra 75 minutes every single day!

    IMHO, definitely not a WTF!



  • Because of the timezone difference, all clocks start at 2:00 in Japan. Still only 24 hours. Not a problem.



  • They just misspelled it. The shop closes at [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swatch_Internet_Time]@26.00[/url] or 37 minutes, 26 seconds after midnight.



  • Actually this is used by TV programs in Japan too.  Shows after midnight are scheduled at 25:00 and so on.  Better than having a 3:00 in the morning and another 3:00 in the evening on the same day. (Why can't TV magazines just use the correct date anyway?)

     



  • @drtelnet said:

    Actually this is used by TV programs in Japan too.  Shows after midnight are scheduled at 25:00 and so on.  Better than having a 3:00 in the morning and another 3:00 in the evening on the same day. (Why can't TV magazines just use the correct date anyway?)

     

     What about 8 in the morning and 8 in the evening? ;)



  • @drtelnet said:

    Actually this is used by TV programs in Japan too.  Shows after midnight are scheduled at 25:00 and so on.  Better than having a 3:00 in the morning and another 3:00 in the evening on the same day. (Why can't TV magazines just use the correct date anyway?)

     

    That's insane! Why don't they just use a 24-hour clock and have 3:00 and 15:00?</p?



  • @rbowes said:

    @drtelnet said:

    Actually this is used by TV programs in Japan too.  Shows after midnight are scheduled at 25:00 and so on.  Better than having a 3:00 in the morning and another 3:00 in the evening on the same day. (Why can't TV magazines just use the correct date anyway?)

     

    That's insane! Why don't they just use a 24-hour clock and have 3:00 and 15:00?

    This isn't really logical. If they have a 25:00 time, they already use 24-hour clock. But then, they can't have two identical times in one day.

    Or formulated differently, how do they get from 3:00 in the evening to 25:00 in the night? 



  • @PSWorx said:

    This isn't really logical. If they have a 25:00 time, they already use 24-hour clock. But then, they can't have two identical times in one day.

    Or formulated differently, how do they get from 3:00 in the evening to 25:00 in the night? 



    They would have to go back in time, I guess. Assuming by 3:00 in the evening you mean 3:00 AM, that's 2 hours after 25:00, which I guess is 1AM



  • @SuperousOxide said:

    @PSWorx said:

    This isn't really logical. If they have a 25:00 time, they already use 24-hour clock. But then, they can't have two identical times in one day.

    Or formulated differently, how do they get from 3:00 in the evening to 25:00 in the night?



    They would have to go back in time, I guess. Assuming by 3:00 in the evening you mean 3:00 AM, that's 2 hours after 25:00, which I guess is 1AM

    No, I meant 3:00 PM. Granted, it's not really evening, but less than "morning". I'm not really used to 12 hour notation, so sorry if I used the wrong expressions.



  • Haven't you ever seen Japanese office workers? They've been using a 26 hour day for about 50 years. Half of them sleep in the office.



  • I think the japanese just count differently than we do.... http://www.metacafe.com/watch/300330/counting_in_english_japanese_game_show/

    For the record, the store closes at ten ten six.

     



  • My previous place of employment used a 26.5 hour clock.

     

    26:00 is 2am the next day.

    Why is that relevant?  Because the 'day' according to the business systems started about 3am.  So instead of having their own clock (stupid idea you'll agree) the use the normal clock but have it continue past midnight until the end of the business day, at 2:30am the day after.

     It makes sense in that context.

    In the context above, not so much.
     



  • For anyone who has lived in Japan, this is common. They use a 24 hour clock, but when it goes past 24:00, they continue counting. Especially for train timetables, where you buy a ticket that can be used until the last service of the day, which may be at 27:00.



  • @Founder_IO said:

    For anyone who has lived in Japan, this is common. They use a 24 hour clock, but when it goes past 24:00, they continue counting. Especially for train timetables, where you buy a ticket that can be used until the last service of the day, which may be at 27:00.

    Supposedly their TV schedules do this too—counting up from 24:00 until signoff.



  • Yes, this makes sense (a little) for things that shut off after midnight, like a bar or a train line, but televsion?  Television is round the clock! 

    On the other hand, having TV shows start at 27:00 as opposed to 3:00 am might make certain people more tired and more likely to go to bed at night rather than staying up all night.  I guess it all depends.



  • @belgariontheking said:

    Yes, this makes sense (a little) for things that shut off after
    midnight, like a bar or a train line, but televsion?  Television is
    round the clock!

    Do you really count “Paid Programming” as content?



  • So their clock basically goes from 02:00 to 26:00 or 03:00 to 27:00 

    That's really goddamn stupid.



  • Doesn't seem like such a bad idea to me.  There are plenty of times when it would make things a lot clearer.  People often refer to the early morning hours as part of the previous night instead of the current day's morning.  For example, someone might say, "I have to catch the 1am train on Thursday."  Are they talking about Thursday morning or Friday morning?  "I have to catch the 25:00 train on Thursday" is completely unambiguous.

    At any rate, I can think of dozens of really goddamn stupider things we do in the US.  Using English units of measurement, pricing things X.99 (and not adding in the sales tax until checkout either), etc.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @austboss said:

    Doesn't seem like such a bad idea to me.  There are plenty of times when it would make things a lot clearer.  People often refer to the early morning hours as part of the previous night instead of the current day's morning.  For example, someone might say, "I have to catch the 1am train on Thursday."  Are they talking about Thursday morning or Friday morning?  "I have to catch the 25:00 train on Thursday" is completely unambiguous.

    I'm sorry, but I fail to comprehend the thought process that goes on in someones head if "a train at 1am on Thursday" meant anything other than a train at 0100 on Thursday.

    Possibly a bad example?

     I see the possible benifit of using 2400+ for ending times, but not for starting times. e.g. the train will leave X at 2300 and will arrive at Y at 2730, the next train will leave 2 hours later at 0100 and arrive at 0530.



  • @belgariontheking said:

    Yes, this makes sense (a little) for things that shut off after midnight, like a bar or a train line, but televsion?  Television is round the clock! 

    On the other hand, having TV shows start at 27:00 as opposed to 3:00 am might make certain people more tired and more likely to go to bed at night rather than staying up all night.  I guess it all depends.

    Yeah, but the boundary between days has to be placed somewhere for scheduling and listings purposes etc, and putting it at midnight wouldn't work too well (since there is still stuff people want to watch on then, and dealing with shows that start one day and finish the next is a pain). In the UK, the changeover is at 6:00am, and I think most TV stations don't schedule anything that crosses 6am. (Of course, this makes programming VCRs and the like interesting, since you have to remember that the show at 1am on the Thursday page of the TV listings is actually 1am Friday.)


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