C++-- == C+



  • A coworker just mentioned that 20 years ago, in college, they programmed C and C+.  Apparently, C+ was a precursor to C++.  I never knew that.  Maybe my coworker went to the same school that now teaches C pound.



  • When the concepts of objects and object-oriented programming were being developed, the standard C language didn't have the built-in structures to handle them. However, C was (and is) still highly useful and well worth keeping around, so a sort of extended C language was developed. This language was essentially "C and then some", or C-plus (C+). As the concepts of object-oriented programming continued to develop, C+ had to be upgraded, and became C++.

    Certainly differs from the history I always heard.  Must be some Dark Secret that ANSI's trying to protect us from, for our own good.



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    http://www.play-hookey.com/computers/programming_languages.html

    When the concepts of objects and object-oriented programming were being developed, the standard C language didn't have the built-in structures to handle them. However, C was (and is) still highly useful and well worth keeping around, so a sort of extended C language was developed. This language was essentially "C and then some", or C-plus (C+). As the concepts of object-oriented programming continued to develop, C+ had to be upgraded, and became C++.

    Certainly differs from the history I always heard.  Must be some Dark Secret that ANSI's trying to protect us from, for our own good.

    I managed to find an explanation

    @Wikipedia said:

    This name is credited to Rick Mascitti (mid-1983) and was first used in December 1983. Earlier, during the research period, the developing language had been referred to as "new C", then "C with Classes". In computer science C++ is still referred to as a superstructure of C. The final name stems from C's "++" operator (which increments the value of a variable) and a common naming convention of using "+" to indicate an enhanced computer program. According to Stroustrup: "the name signifies the evolutionary nature of the changes from C". C+ was the name of an earlier, unrelated programming language.

    One good thing about HTML editing in the foreign software - you can post chunks of wikipedia articles and the links will be preserved



  • @Random832 said:

    foreign software
    I have no idea how this happened. forum software.



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    http://www.play-hookey.com/computers/programming_languages.html

    When the concepts of objects and object-oriented programming were being developed, the standard C language didn't have the built-in structures to handle them. However, C was (and is) still highly useful and well worth keeping around, so a sort of extended C language was developed. This language was essentially "C and then some", or C-plus (C+). As the concepts of object-oriented programming continued to develop, C+ had to be upgraded, and became C++.

    Certainly differs from the history I always heard.  Must be some Dark Secret that ANSI's trying to protect us from, for our own good.

     
    Yeah, wtf?   I had never heard it that way either -- that's complete BS.  Sounds like the OP's coworker got his info from that site.

     
    Even my college textbooks told the old story about AT&T, the BCPL ("B") as a precursor to the C Language,  then the new "C with Classes," which changed to C++, a nod to the postincrement operator used in both languages.

     

    Stroustrup's FAQ seems to imply there once was an unrelated language called C+: 

    http://www.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq.html#name 



  • In all my research, I didn't find a language named c+, but I did find that Sunkist (the soft drink) had a version named CPlus in Canada.  It didn't have caffeine.  Caffeine is what makes Sunkist superior to other orange sodas.  Crazy Canucks.

     



  • If they've removed the caffeine, shouldn't they call it CMinus?



  • As a Canadian lesson for you, C Plus is the de facto brand of orange pop.  Also, there's an old (silly) federal law that no drink can contain caffeine if it isn't dark in color.  Hence, Mountain Dew doesn't contain caffeine either (which completely ruins it).  On the other hand, I never would have considered adding caffeine to orange pop.

     



  • Some people jocularly refer to code that's written in C++ but uses an excessive number of C idioms as "C+".(You know the kind of thing - stdio instead of iostreams, char* instead of a string class, C arrays instead of STL containers, dumb pointers everywhere instead of references or smart pointers, no RAII...)

    And that "play-hookey" page is hilarious. Javascript "an interpreted version of Java"? Perl "very similar to C"? WTF?



  • From the play-hookey site : "First came an experimental language called A, which was improved, corrected, and expanded until it was called B. This language in turn was improved, upgraded, and debugged and was finally called C."

    I never knew that story either....



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    http://www.play-hookey.com/computers/programming_languages.html

    When the concepts of objects and object-oriented programming were being developed, the standard C language didn't have the built-in structures to handle them. However, C was (and is) still highly useful and well worth keeping around, so a sort of extended C language was developed. This language was essentially "C and then some", or C-plus (C+). As the concepts of object-oriented programming continued to develop, C+ had to be upgraded, and became C++.

    Certainly differs from the history I always heard.  Must be some Dark Secret that ANSI's trying to protect us from, for our own good.

    C has structs and function pointers, thats enough to write OO code, if you really want to...



  • @ActionMan said:

    @vt_mruhlin said:

    http://www.play-hookey.com/computers/programming_languages.html

    When the concepts of objects and object-oriented programming were being developed, the standard C language didn't have the built-in structures to handle them. However, C was (and is) still highly useful and well worth keeping around, so a sort of extended C language was developed. This language was essentially "C and then some", or C-plus (C+). As the concepts of object-oriented programming continued to develop, C+ had to be upgraded, and became C++.

    Certainly differs from the history I always heard.  Must be some Dark Secret that ANSI's trying to protect us from, for our own good.

    C has structs and function pointers, thats enough to write OO code, if you really want to...

    Pretty much any language is enough to write OO code. Not even Turing-completeness is a requirement. You don't need a special kind of house to paint the walls yellow, and you don't need a special kind of language to do OO. 



  • @RevEng said:

    As a Canadian lesson for you, C Plus is the de facto brand of orange pop.  Also, there's an old (silly) federal law that no drink can contain caffeine if it isn't dark in color.  Hence, Mountain Dew doesn't contain caffeine either (which completely ruins it).  On the other hand, I never would have considered adding caffeine to orange pop.

    Does that include beer?  This article talks about caffeinated beer.  Most lagers and ales are pretty light.  Does a beer need to be a porter or stout to be caffeinated too?

    And caffeine free mountain dew?!?!  That is a WTF.



  • Caffeine is a drug, companies add it to things in the hope that you get addicted to it.

    Try going a few days without it, and tell me that you're not feeling withdrawal (headaches, fatigue, inability to concentrate, even nausea and depression).

    From wiki: "Complete tolerance to sleep disruption effects of caffeine develops after consuming 400 mg of caffeine 3 times a day for 7 days." Presumably after that you are only drinking it to ward off the withdrawal symptoms (or because you like the taste of the caffeinated product).

    Of course, like everyone else I drink too much of it.


    Hmm, apparently smoking causes caffeine to be destroyed / passed out of the body quicker. Explains why the heavy smokers I know drink more coffee than the non-smokers.



  • @Mal1024 said:

    From the play-hookey site : "First came an experimental language called A, which was improved, corrected, and expanded until it was called B. This language in turn was improved, upgraded, and debugged and was finally called C."

    I never knew that story either....

    Whippersnappers and their newfangled C programming language!  I invented A and it does all I need!  We have only three commands: PRINT, GOTO, and CALL so you can jump into your assembly program.  That's where your REAL WORK gets done!  Lazy kids... 



  • @Thief^ said:

    Caffeine is a drug, companies add it to things in the hope that you get addicted to it.

    Try going a few days without it, and tell me that you're not feeling withdrawal (headaches, fatigue, inability to concentrate, even nausea and depression).

    From wiki: "Complete tolerance to sleep disruption effects of caffeine develops after consuming 400 mg of caffeine 3 times a day for 7 days." Presumably after that you are only drinking it to ward off the withdrawal symptoms (or because you like the taste of the caffeinated product).

    Of course, like everyone else I drink too much of it.


    Hmm, apparently smoking causes caffeine to be destroyed / passed out of the body quicker. Explains why the heavy smokers I know drink more coffee than the non-smokers.

     

    Fact: I drink about 5-7 20 oz. bottles of diet coke every day.
    Fact: I have on multiple occasions stopped drinking caffeine for periods ranging from 3 to 60 days.
    Fact: I have never experienced headaches, fatigue, inability to concentrate, nausea or depression during this period.
    Conclusion: I am not drinking caffeine to ward off withdrawal symptoms. 
     



  • @tster said:

    Fact: I drink about 5-7 20 oz. bottles of diet coke every day.

    Prediction: You are wide, dude.



  • We had a guy who drank red bull by the six-pack.

    He was also really fit. Could probably snap me in half. His preferred editor: VIM. It was absolutely shitty to try and work on a code problem with him on his machine. 🙂


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