Departing to... End program



  • Lerger version here



  • Before anyone else beats me:

    "Houston, we have have a problem!"

     

    Well, at least the window is slightly transparent... But the real WTF is still that they use Windows.



  • @Evo said:

    Well, at least the window is slightly transparent... But the real WTF is still that they use Windows.

    No, the window is not transparent, the screen is burned. But I still agree with you concerning the real WTF!

     

    To the OP, do not simply specify smaller dimensions for the image, do a real, smaller image. The file is almost 2MB!



  • Almost 2 MB!!!

    You on 56k or something?

     

    I don't see how 2 MB can cause problems if I consider the current state of technology.



  • @Ice^^Heat said:

    You on 56k or something?

    Since you ask, yes I am.



  • @Evo said:

    Before anyone else beats me:

    "Houston, we have have a problem!"

     

    Well, at least the window is slightly transparent... But the real WTF is still that they use Windows.

    Why is using windows here a 'WTF'?  From what I see some application that is running on Windows has stopped responding.  Can you enlighten me as to how you have figured out this is due to a flaw in Windows and not the non-responsive application itself?



  • I took the picture, and the screen was actually constantly getting updated. Which was really annoying because every second the rows of data moved. Hard to find anything that way...

    I think the error message did burn in.



  • @kswanton said:

    Why is using windows here a 'WTF'?  From what I see some application that is running on Windows has stopped responding.  Can you enlighten me as to how you have figured out this is due to a flaw in Windows and not the non-responsive application itself?

    A real embedded system wouldn't have a dialog window like that, it'd kill the program quietly (logging it to a server maybe) and restart without the "user" (general public) seeing anything weird or requiring intervention at all.

    Yes it's technically the apps fault for not-responding, but it's windows' "fault" for not acting embedded and showing something suitable only for desktops.



  • Well, hey, it's just truth in advertising -- the airport is apparently named after a Bush, so nothing works right. What more can you expect? (Hey, it's even in Houston, which means the airport is also responsible for sending thousands of Americans off to a hole in the desert...)



  • @bitpirate said:

    @kswanton said:

    Why is using windows here a 'WTF'?  From what I see some application that is running on Windows has stopped responding.  Can you enlighten me as to how you have figured out this is due to a flaw in Windows and not the non-responsive application itself?

    A real embedded system wouldn't have a dialog window like that, it'd kill the program quietly (logging it to a server maybe) and restart without the "user" (general public) seeing anything weird or requiring intervention at all.

    Yes it's technically the apps fault for not-responding, but it's windows' "fault" for not acting embedded and showing something suitable only for desktops.

    No. It's the admins' fault for not setting up things right. I've developped apps for TV in the past which run on Windows. The first time I went on a station for deployment job, the operator showed how he got two screens connected to the server. Having the broadcasting output in the secondary monitor was enough for keeping message boxes from appearing over whatever they were broadcasting. Yeah, it's a workaround, but I think they could do it like that in the airport - have error messages appearing only on the operator's screen.



  • Now <b>there's</b> <i>The Real WTF</i> ;-)

    Edit: Interpret the html yourself, I can't be bothered with wysiwyg! 



  • @The Vicar said:

    Well, hey, it's just truth in advertising -- the airport is apparently named after a Bush, so nothing works right. What more can you expect? (Hey, it's even in Houston, which means the airport is also responsible for sending thousands of Americans off to a hole in the desert...)
    A hole in the desert that enables mankind to explore space that is...



  • @Ice^^Heat said:

    Almost 2 MB!!!

    You on 56k or something?

     

    I don't see how 2 MB can cause problems if I consider the current state of technology.

    Dude, don't be that guy. 2MB does not display instantly. You're being wasteful. That photo doesn't have do be any bigger than 200K.



  • Agreed, until that image started getting cached it took about 10 seconds for me to load (I'm using an adsl line), now that is cached it still takes about a second to load and I can actually watch it load (I'm presuming the delay is the software rendering the image itself).



  • I hate it how nearly everyone thinks that everyone has broadband so crap like huge webpages/images and Flash are no big deal. Meanwhile, I'm stuck in rural Oregon (thanks to my parents...) with dial up that can barely accomplish 33kbps.



  • @Spacecoyote said:

    I hate it how nearly everyone thinks that everyone has broadband so crap like huge webpages/images and Flash are no big deal. Meanwhile, I'm stuck in rural Oregon (thanks to my parents...) with dial up that can barely accomplish 33kbps.


    any other options? CDMA, 3G, EDGE?



  • @Spacecoyote said:

    I hate it how nearly everyone thinks that everyone has broadband so crap like huge webpages/images and Flash are no big deal. Meanwhile, I'm stuck in rural Oregon (thanks to my parents...) with dial up that can barely accomplish 33kbps.

    Until broadband finally made it to my parents' village, we were stuck with a 28.8kbps connection...

    Even ISDN wasn't available.

    Now of course, they get >4Mbps 



  • @ahnfelt said:

    Now <b>there's</b> <i>The Real WTF</i> ;-)

    Edit: Interpret the html yourself, I can't be bothered with wysiwyg! 

    If you don't like WYSIWYG, you should install noscript or block this site's JavaScript some other way. then you're left with a plain ol' HTML editor.



  • Or just push the "HTML" button at the right of the toolbar.



  • @Spacecoyote said:

    I hate it how nearly everyone thinks that everyone has broadband so crap like huge webpages/images and Flash are no big deal. Meanwhile, I'm stuck in rural Oregon (thanks to my parents...) with dial up that can barely accomplish 33kbps.

    And there are a lot of parts of the US which are the same way, and which are going to be that way for a long time. People who live in cities have no idea how absent broadband is. It's not just a problem in mountaintop poverty-stricken Appalachia. There are massive numbers of small towns all over the nation with no broadband and no hope of getting it in the next ten years. The phone lines are of such poor quality that modems won't achieve better than 26,400 bps. These are not villages, they're towns with all the modern conveniences except broadband. (And as someone who had satellite broadband for four years, I can assure you it sucks every bit as much as one would think. The latency is just the beginning; the problem is not the technical limitations, it's the terrible service.)

    Designing any web content which effectively gives the finger to people on modem connections is choosing to exclude millions of American readers.



  • @VGR said:

    And there are a lot of parts of the US which are the same way, and which are going to be that way for a long time. People who live in cities have no idea how absent broadband is. It's not just a problem in mountaintop poverty-stricken Appalachia. There are massive numbers of small towns all over the nation with no broadband and no hope of getting it in the next ten years. The phone lines are of such poor quality that modems won't achieve better than 26,400 bps. These are not villages, they're towns with all the modern conveniences except broadband. (And as someone who had satellite broadband for four years, I can assure you it sucks every bit as much as one would think. The latency is just the beginning; the problem is not the technical limitations, it's the terrible service.)

    Given the utterly ridiculous state of the US telecom monopolies, which are largely unregulated these days (and have been for many years now thanks to astute political manoeuvring by the telecom companies), it is a miracle that broadband works anywhere outside the major cities. The only reason that these minor towns have telephone lines at all is because the government paid for it and permitted the telecom companies to embezzle most of that money.

    We have viable broadband here in the UK because of close government regulation of our telecom monopoly; BT have steadfastly opposed the deployment of every new generation of internet technology, at every turn. When ADSL was invented and the rest of the world were using it, BT were saying "Nobody would ever want to buy that when they could use a 56k modem. We're not deploying it. Go away". Every new development has to be forcibly beaten out of them; if it wasn't for the regulator, nothing would happen.

    If you live in the US, you need to either regulate your monopolies, abolish them, or bend over. 



  • @asuffield said:

    Given the utterly ridiculous state of the US telecom monopolies, which are largely unregulated these days (and have been for many years now thanks to astute political manoeuvring by the telecom companies), it is a miracle that broadband works anywhere outside the major cities. The only reason that these minor towns have telephone lines at all is because the government paid for it and permitted the telecom companies to embezzle most of that money.

    We have viable broadband here in the UK because of close government regulation of our telecom monopoly; BT have steadfastly opposed the deployment of every new generation of internet technology, at every turn. When ADSL was invented and the rest of the world were using it, BT were saying "Nobody would ever want to buy that when they could use a 56k modem. We're not deploying it. Go away". Every new development has to be forcibly beaten out of them; if it wasn't for the regulator, nothing would happen.

    If you live in the US, you need to either regulate your monopolies, abolish them, or bend over.

    Stark contrast to Dutchland, where I can't turn a corner without tripping over bundles of fresh green cable-tube sticking out of the ground, and cable ISPs shouting at us with commercials; Our shit is faster! No ours! No wait, ours! Latest tech! Better cable! More data speedz! You give us your money, we give you the shizzle!

    The weird thing is that although our network infrastructure is improving by the minute, similar effects cannot be observed for public transportation. Proper bus service is somewhat withdrawing from the countryside.
     



  • Yeah but who wants to live in an American Desert town anyway?

    Move to a city, thats where it's at!

    At least there much better TV in the U.S. (HDTV)



  • @Ice^^Heat said:

    At least there much better TV in the U.S. (HDTV)

    HD crap is still crap.

    Not that I don't recognise crap is still better than nothing.

     



  • @CDarklock said:

    @Ice^^Heat said:

    At least there much better TV in the U.S. (HDTV)

    HD crap is still crap.

    Not that I don't recognise crap is still better than nothing.

    That's pretty questionable. I have often considered it amusing that the US can manage near-complete TV coverage, but only rather spotty education in remote areas. It's all about priorities.


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