Naming convention WTF in reality



  • The real WTF is that this map is 100% accurate:

    http://qbolec.magma-net.pl/canaletta_czy_bacciarellego.png

    it's not so funny when you are waiting for an ambulance or a fire engine.



  • WTF? Where is this?



  • @Welbog said:

    WTF? Where is this?
    Poland



  • This is terrible... What kind of person names so many streets the same? Is there at least a nice numbering convention on the streets that have the same name? Like buildings 100-199 are on the northmost street, and 200-299 are on the next northmost and so on? How do you get mail? How do you call a taxi? WTF?!



  • @qbolec said:

    The real WTF is that this map is 100% accurate:

    http://qbolec.magma-net.pl/canaletta_czy_bacciarellego.png

    it's not so funny when you are waiting for an ambulance or a fire engine.

      Nah, but I'll tell you what is funny:  I just spent twenty seconds clicking on that map and wondering why the zoom bar and drag-pan wasn't working....

       ;-)

     



  • @Welbog said:

    This is terrible... What kind of person names so many streets the same? Is there at least a nice numbering convention on the streets that have the same name? Like buildings 100-199 are on the northmost street, and 200-299 are on the next northmost and so on? How do you get mail? How do you call a taxi? WTF?!

    Numbers are actually increasing one way, with even on the left and odd numbers on the right (in PL cities) - but how did they resolve it in that place? No idea...
     



  • Please tell me that "bacciarellego" is Polish for "street" or "avenue", and the actual names are hidden?



  • WTF?  Is bacciarellago the Polish word for peachtree* or something?

    *Atlanta joke.  In metro ATL, there are a couple hundred streets named "Peachtree" something, but only a couple dozen inside the city itself. 



  • @qbolec said:

    it's not so funny when you are waiting for an ambulance or a fire engine.

    <insert a how do you confuse a Pole joke here />



  • @DaveK said:

    @qbolec said:

    The real WTF is that this map is 100% accurate:

    http://qbolec.magma-net.pl/canaletta_czy_bacciarellego.png

    it's not so funny when you are waiting for an ambulance or a fire engine.

      Nah, but I'll tell you what is funny:  I just spent twenty seconds clicking on that map and wondering why the zoom bar and drag-pan wasn't working....

       ;-)

     

     Funny.  I will admit I did the same...  there are buttons, I should be able to click those!



  • I parked my care on Oneway Street and had a hard time finding it again.

     



  • @rbowes said:

    Please tell me that "bacciarellego" is Polish for "street" or "avenue", and the actual names are hidden?

     

    From poltran.com

     

    <font color="#0a6b6c">Translation: STREET</font>
    <font style="">A</font> <font style="">ULICZNY</font>
    <font style="">N</font> <font style=""><nobr>F  ULICA</nobr>;  <nobr>F  JEZDNIA</nobr></font>

     

    <font color="#0a6b6c">Translation: AVENUE</font>
    <font style="">N</font> <font style=""><nobr>F  ULICA</nobr>;  <nobr>F  ALEJA</nobr>;  <nobr>M  BULWAR</nobr>;  <nobr>F  DROGA</nobr>;  <nobr>M  DOSTĘP</nobr></font>

     

    When we went to Germany 20-odd years ago, my dad mentioned thinking at first that there was this huge city named "Ausfahrt" that he'd never heard of before.




  • @emurphy said:

    @rbowes said:

    Please tell me that "bacciarellego" is Polish for "street" or "avenue", and the actual names are hidden?

     

    From poltran.com

     

    <font color="#0a6b6c">Translation: STREET</font>
    <font style="">A</font> <font style="">ULICZNY</font>
    <font style="">N</font> <font style=""><nobr>F  ULICA</nobr>;  <nobr>F  JEZDNIA</nobr></font>

     

    <font color="#0a6b6c">Translation: AVENUE</font>
    <font style="">N</font> <font style=""><nobr>F  ULICA</nobr>;  <nobr>F  ALEJA</nobr>;  <nobr>M  BULWAR</nobr>;  <nobr>F  DROGA</nobr>;  <nobr>M  DOSTĘP</nobr></font>

     

    When we went to Germany 20-odd years ago, my dad mentioned thinking at first that there was this huge city named "Ausfahrt" that he'd never heard of before.


    <insert image with 'joke' swooshing over 'head'>
     



  • @poochner said:

    WTF?  Is bacciarellago the Polish word for peachtree* or something?

    *Atlanta joke.  In metro ATL, there are a couple hundred streets named "Peachtree" something, but only a couple dozen inside the city itself. 

     

    nice atlanta reference. i've definitely driven through places that were similar (although not quite as bad) as that map of poland in the suburbs north of atlanta. one road has three different names, but the middle section has the same exact name as a parallel road a mile south. its crazy.

     

    they also love "s" junctions (hard to draw without monospace font):

                   | cross road
                   | 
    ======================= main road
                                     |
                                     | cross road

     So you'll have instructions that say "Continue on 'Cross Rd' past 'Main Rd' for 1 mile. But as you approach Main Rd. it looks like a dead-end (or T junction), because you can't see the other road segment with the same name from that intersection. If you're lucky, you happen to turn the right way and see another road a half mile away with the same name...else, you're like me.

     



  • This isn't quite as confusing, but it does require you to be a little specific... (San Jose, CA)

    http://www.madhack.com/~madhack/alma2.png



  • Wow, every time I saw an intersection in the picture, I though "This can't possibly be another bacciarellego."  BUT IT WAS!!

    This should be on the front page.



  • Wow, every time I saw an intersection in the picture, I though "This
    can't possibly be another bacciarellego."  BUT IT WAS!!

    This should be on the front page.

     

    If it is indeed accurate and not a software error, then it's not an IT WTF.

    There are plenty of government WTF sites out there, and worsethanfailure.com is not one of them.
     



  • @newfweiler said:

    I parked my care on Oneway Street and had a hard time finding it again.
    I know several people that parked in Senso unico in Italian cities.



  • In my city, we have several very curious little roads.

    Here's the most interesting, and hardest to spot...

    start downtown, at the waterfront. Look for "Front Street", and follow it north. Go straight through the intersection, and you're on Comox. Keep going straight, and you're on Bowen. Go straight back across the highway 5 kilometers ahead, and you're on Norwell. Keep going straight, and you'll end up on Jinglepot. Go straight, straight, and straight, then hang your first and only left. You're still on Jinglepot. Go straight for about 7 kilometers... you'll be tempted to take a left or right at numerous intersections, but just keep going straight... go straight across the bypass... and now you're on third. Keep going straight, and now you're on Fitzwilliam. Go straight across the overpass over the highway, and you're on Bastion street... and now you're on Front street again. Follow it straight, and you're on Comox...

    This one is even better.

    Look on the left side for Pine street. It goes north to where it crosses Fitzwilliam, and then later crosses Bowen. Pine street has 6 ends. One way north, out of view. Another down south on-screen, where Pine meets 5th. But look up and over just a bit from there... and you'll see Pine street again, where it appears to start at Hecate and end at the Highway. Except it doesn't... draw a line out from Princess street towards Pine, to where you can see a faint 'dent' in Pine street. The railroad passes through right there, and cuts pine street in half. It's not a crossing, it's a gully with a railroad track in the middle. Pine street is there bisected. What makes it worse is that on one side of the tracks are houses numbered 402, 408, and 418... and across the gulley numbered 408, 412, 430, and 462, and then crosses Victoria street and starts its 500 block.

    Until I was 20 years old, and starting to spend more than a couple days at a time in another city, I had never learned that addresses are normally broken into 100-blocks by cross-streets... hell, in this city, you can't even rely on even and odd addresses being on opposite sides of the street!

    At least with the sole exception of Pine street, you can rely on addresses being in increasing order up both sides of the street in the same direction... but two parallel streets rarely increase in the same direction!



  • @Tiogshi said:

    This one is even better.

    http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&hl=en&om=1&ie=UTF8&ll=49.15812,-123.941188&spn=0.01044,0.019526&z=16

    Look on the left side for Pine street. It goes north to where it crosses Fitzwilliam, and then later crosses Bowen. Pine street has 6 ends. One way north, out of view.

    Further to that - WTF is Comox doing there with that little appendix at the top end of Pine St ??

     
    Weird shit, that city. 



  • @ender said:

    @newfweiler said:
    I parked my care on Oneway Street and had a hard time finding it again. 
    I know several people that parked in Senso unico in Italian cities.

    Not to mention Einbahnstrasse in Germany.  Mr. Einbahn must have been some really famous dude.  Wasn't he that relativity guy, like E = MC squared?



  • @poochner said:

    WTF?  Is bacciarellago the Polish word for peachtree* or something?

    *Atlanta joke.  In metro ATL, there are a couple hundred streets named "Peachtree" something, but only a couple dozen inside the city itself. 

    hahahahhaahhahaahhahahahahahhahaah

    (wipes tears from eyes)

    I recently visited Atlanta for the 1st time, and made a mistake with my hotel address, thinking it was "peachtree st" when it was really "w. peachtree st".  Fortunately close enough to each other not to matter.

    I thought I really liked peaches.  Until I visited Georgia.  Clearly, I do not have what it takes to be a Georgian :-) 



  • @newfweiler said:

    @ender said:

    @newfweiler said:
    I parked my care on Oneway Street and had a hard time finding it again. 
    I know several people that parked in Senso unico in Italian cities.

    Not to mention Einbahnstrasse in Germany.  Mr. Einbahn must have been some really famous dude.  Wasn't he that relativity guy, like E = MC squared?

    "Einbahnstraße" simply means one-way street, and normally, a sign proclaiming "Einbahnstraße" or short "Einbahn" has an arrow on it and is accompanied by a sign with the real street name. However, some streets in villages are not named, in which case it might look like the name of the street is "Einbahnstraße", but actually, the street has no name.



  • @poochner said:

    WTF?  Is bacciarellago the Polish word for peachtree* or something?

    *Atlanta joke.  In metro ATL, there are a couple hundred streets named "Peachtree" something, but only a couple dozen inside the city itself. 



    Being a Georgian myself, I know exactly what you mean. I think "Martin Luther King, Jr" and "Bankhead" follow Peachtree in overuse. Our main stretch out here changes names too many times, one of which is a Bankhead.

    1. (Villa Rica side) Highway 61. This goes for quite a distance and breaks apart somewhere in Villa Rica, but continues in another location.
    2. Bankhead Ave/Hwy. Google Maps shows Highway, but if you look in the phone book, they alternate between Avenue and Highway. Even the place I worked at had their address listed as "Ave" until a new employee pointed out that maps show it as Hwy. But, it depends on which map is being looked at.
    3. Newnan St (which Newnan RD forks off of and actually heads towards Newnan). This name only lasts 2 or 3 blocks.
    4. Alabama St. Goes from Adamson Square until Columbia Drive/Brumbelow Rd (same road, but changes name at an intersection). Also, recently they "renamed" a stretch of this to some-person-or-another (don't remember the name) Parkway. So, technically, there's another name in here.
    5. Highway 16/Mount Zion Road. This continues through Mount Zion. I think it changes names again, but since I don't go that far, I'm not sure what the names are.

    That gives a 5 or so mile stretch 6 different names even though there isn't even a shift in the road. It's one long stretch with some curves.



  • @mdk said:

    @newfweiler said:

    @ender said:

    @newfweiler said:
    I parked my care on Oneway Street and had a hard time finding it again. 
    I know several people that parked in Senso unico in Italian cities.

    Not to mention Einbahnstrasse in Germany.  Mr. Einbahn must have been some really famous dude.  Wasn't he that relativity guy, like E = MC squared?

    "Einbahnstraße" simply means one-way street, and normally, a sign proclaiming "Einbahnstraße" or short "Einbahn" has an arrow on it and is accompanied by a sign with the real street name. However, some streets in villages are not named, in which case it might look like the name of the street is "Einbahnstraße", but actually, the street has no name.

    *whoosh*



  • Ah, Atlanta...  Peachtree Corners Circle.

    In Dallas, there is Northwest Highway... didivded of course into West Northwest Highway and East Northwest Highway...  So you could be on the south side of East Northwest Highway.



  • @DWalker59 said:

    Ah, Atlanta...  Peachtree Corners Circle.

    In Dallas, there is Northwest Highway... didivded of course into West Northwest Highway and East Northwest Highway...  So you could be on the south side of East Northwest Highway.

     

    Ah, Dallas, The only city I know of where there is an interstate split in 2. You have I35E and I35W, separated by several miles at times. These roads run N/S so heading form Dalas to Denton, for example, you would travel on I35E N while if you then wanted to go to Ft. Worth, you take I35W S. Fun Times.

     

    ~SE



  •  

    Pinecrest Dr 


    Not quite as big a WTF, but I love it when roads cross themselves more than once.


     



  • Actually, "Bacciarellego" is a genitival (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genitival), i.e. possesive case of a noun and it basically means "[street] of Bacciarelli"

    Both streets are named after Italian painters staying in Poland in 1700s
    Bacciarelli: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcello_Bacciarelli
    Canaletto: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernardo_Bellotto (student of another Canaletto)

    Street numbers are generally given according to Napoleon's law - one side has odd and the other even numbers. Note that the estates are numbered, not the buildings, so if there are more than one building on one scrap they may get 3a, 3b, 3c numbers. 
    Alternatively, if a building spans many estates, it gets number 125/127/129.



  • Are there actually more than two different street names in Poland?

    ---

    And there's this old joke about the tourist family in Germany helplessly seeking their car which they only remember having parked in Einbahnstraße. :P



  • @Arancaytar said:

    Are there actually more than two different street names in Poland?



    There are. Between two towns there used to be a border street called Border Street. Since each side of the street belonged to another settlement each of them numbered the estates by themselves. As a result, there were two different houses with number 46 Border Street.

    I believe after local authorities were granted a Golden Toilet Seat Award it was changed.


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