U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017



  • @mott555 said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    I always heard 80 minutes of capacity for a CD.

    As I remember, it started at 74 then soon expanded to 80.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election



  • @dkf said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    74 minutes. Or one slowly-played Beethoven's 9th Symphony long, rounded up to a convenient manufacturing size.

    @el_heffe said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    (77:56)

    @timebandit said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    From Wikipedia:

    @mott555 said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    80 minutes

    You all are right, but @dkf is righter; Sony chose 74 minutes (Beethoven's 9th Symphony as conducted by Furtwangler (gotta love that name)) specifically to screw over Polygram into having to rebuild their factory for an extra 5mm of disc diameter. That's also why CDs are 16-bit and 44,100Hz: because Polygram made hardware for a pilot program 115mm, 14-bit, 44,000Hz, 60-minute CD and Sony wanted to nuke that advantage. The reason the spindle hole of a CD is the size it is is because someone had a Canadian nickel and went "eh, ship it!"

    80-90 minute "CDs" are made by packing the data spiral closer together and having abridged lead-in and lead-out areas. Those discs aren't considered standard and older players may have trouble following the spiral, just as nonstandard vinyl can cause the stylus to jump between grooves, but newer (1990+) players have better error-condition-determination circuitry and tracking and can follow along.



  • @twelvebaud said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    Phillips

    That’s the screwdriver. The electronics company is Philips (my father used to be employed by them, so I grew up in a house in which most electr(on)ic devices had the name on them).



  • @gurth said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    That’s the screwdriver. The electronics company is Philips

    TIL they aren't related. Or are they?



  • @gurth Fixed. 😒



  • @benjamin-hall said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    Technically it has some limitations that make it squiffy, but then again most music only has appreciable range of frequencies (~12 kHz, well below the ~20 kHz maximum, which most people can't hear). So 44 kHz sampling rates are more than plenty. And even if they're not, Nyquist folding affects the upper bands first, which have very low amplitude. And intensity is quadratic in amplitude (small squared is tiny), and hearing is logarithmic in intensity (so only large differences in intensity are noticeable). So yeah. Not going to hear a difference even if you do lose a tiny amount of information at the highest frequencies.

    Except, of course, that brass instruments have very high and powerful overtones, and it has been proven that the overtones affect our sensation of lower registers.



  • @twelvebaud said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    Furtwangler (gotta love that name)

    If you love it so much, how about bothering to spell it correctly: Furtwängler.



  • @captain But those overtones aren't appreciable at 22 kHz (which is the Nyquist limit for a 44 kHz sampling rate). There are sound spectroscopy apps for phones and iPads--even in a brass concert, the intensities fall off fast (power-law or better) with increasing frequency.

    Edit: 22 kHz is overtone n=50 for an A (440 Hz). Since amplitude falls off as 1/n (at best, probably 1/n^2 or worse) with frequency, you're looking at at best 2% of the original amplitude, so 0.4% of the intensity. And our ears just aren't that sensitive at those frequencies, so...



  • @captain said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    Except, of course, that brass instruments have very high and powerful overtones, and it has been proven that the overtones affect our sensation of lower registers.

    I forget the name of the effect, but there's something about how the brain perceives musical notes not based on the root note, but by the intervals of overtones. I can actually do a fair impression of a seven-string guitar on a six-string by riffing some power chords that don't have the root note because it would fall on the non-existent seventh string. Your brain extrapolates the overtones and hears that low note that isn't actually present.

    I thought it was "missing root note effect" or something but my Google-fu is failing completely.



  • @mott555 Yeah, that's one effect. There are tons of relevant psychoacoustic effects.

    I'll concede that most people aren't going to be listening closely enough to listen to the cues, so the cost of a stereo and recording infrastructure that can play to 100KHz is pretty pointless except maybe for research for now.

    @Benjamin Hall

    Um, the effect I'm talking about is about overtones out to 100KHz. It's not something one "hears" as a sound, but something one detects by how other sounds sound. People can reliably tell when 100KHz sounds are removed from concert recordings, in double blind testing and everything.



  • @sockpuppet7 said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    @gurth said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    That’s the screwdriver. The electronics company is Philips

    TIL they aren't related. Or are they?

    Nothing to do with each other, to the best of my knowledge. Aha, per Wikipedia:

    The Phillips screw drive (specified as an ANSI Type I Cross Recess[9]) was created by John P. Thompson, who after failing to interest manufacturers, sold his design to businessman Henry F. Phillips.[10][11] Phillips is credited with forming a company (Phillips Screw Company), improving the design, and promoting the adoption of his product.[10]

    whereas:



  • @gąska said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    @scholrlea said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    @gąska said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    @timebandit then who was buying those overpriced CDs? 🚎

    Yuppies.

    *looks up*

    yup·pie
    ˈyəpē/
    noun informal derogatory

    a young person with a well-paid job and a fashionable lifestyle.

    So, hipsters.

    Meh, sort of, but not exactly. Most of the 'Young' Urban Professionals were in their early thirties, and were young compared to the people they were replacing in the corporate world.

    They were, for the most part, ex-hippies (or ones who would later claim to have been hippies, at any rate - it was amazing how the size of Woodstock Nation ballooned from half a million to 20-25 million after 1978) who decided that materialism was for them after all. They were even more conformist than hipsters, believe it or not, even though just like current hipsters they all placed great stock in their own individuality.

    If you have ever seen Family Ties, Steve and Eyse Keaton were a pretty typical contemporary depiction of the first wave of Yuppies, while Jake and Helen Morgendorfer from Daria are typical examples of former Yuppies from one of the later waves.



  • @scholrlea said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    @gąska said in U.S. Cassette Album Sales Rose 35% in 2017:

    So, hipsters.

    Meh, sort of, but not exactly. Most of the 'Young' Urban Professionals were in their early thirties, and were young compared to the people they were replacing in the corporate world.

    There’s also a notable difference in mentality, I think. For many yuppies, money tended to be the main goal in life (the “greed is good” quote from Wall Street comes to mind), whereas I doubt most hipsters will put that at the top of their list of priorities, for example.


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