Everyone loves Microsoft



  • Just a quick one that I discovered in MS Word (2000).
    When I have the following text(or similar) in word:

    "Your work in the introduction part was fairly good and well linked back to Green’s analysis, but from then on you seemed to move away from Green’s analysis"

    The words 'well linked' are highlight as having a grammar problem.

    It is recommended that you change it to 'well-linked' 

    I do so.

    Then word 'well-linked'  has a grammar problem

    It is recommended that you change it to 'well linked' ...

     



  • Yes, the MS Office grammar checker is a worthless piece of crap. Its sole purpose is to make semi-literate mouth-breathers think that they don't need to get their stuff proof-read. It is entirely useless at improving the grammar of a piece of text; the advice it gives is often bad and usually wrong. A triumph of marketing over sanity.



  • I'm pretty sure that neither is right, actually. The "back" makes it sound wrong.



  • Yeah, I think it should be "... and linked back well to ..." or "... and linked back to ... well ...". Preferably the second one.



  • "Your work in the introduction was fairly good and well-linked to Green’s analysis."

    "Part" and "back" are redundant.



  • I tried to replicate your issue (using your sentence) in Word 2003 - it doesn't have a grammar error at all!  They must have sent the office suite back to 'Grammar School' between the updates!<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>



  • @asuffield said:

    Yes, the MS Office grammar checker is a worthless piece of crap. Its sole purpose is to make semi-literate mouth-breathers think that they don't need to get their stuff proof-read. It is entirely useless at improving the grammar of a piece of text; the advice it gives is often bad and usually wrong. A triumph of marketing over sanity.

    No!  It would not say that the check of the grammar is totally useless. It
    opens certain types of errors affluent (for example, mistyping "his"
    instead of "him is"). But, yes, you can never accept your hidden
    advice.



  • @Jojosh_the_Pi said:

    @asuffield said:

    Yes, the MS Office grammar checker is a worthless piece of crap. Its sole purpose is to make semi-literate mouth-breathers think that they don't need to get their stuff proof-read. It is entirely useless at improving the grammar of a piece of text; the advice it gives is often bad and usually wrong. A triumph of marketing over sanity.

    No!  It would not say that the check of the grammar is totally useless. It opens certain types of errors affluent (for example, mistyping "his" instead of "him is"). But, yes, you can never accept your hidden advice.

     

    This reply is satire, right? 

     



  • @Jojosh_the_Pi said:

    @asuffield said:

    Yes, the MS Office grammar checker is a worthless piece of crap. Its sole purpose is to make semi-literate mouth-breathers think that they don't need to get their stuff proof-read. It is entirely useless at improving the grammar of a piece of text; the advice it gives is often bad and usually wrong. A triumph of marketing over sanity.

    No!  It would not say that the check of the grammar is totally useless. It opens certain types of errors affluent (for example, mistyping "his" instead of "him is"). But, yes, you can never accept your hidden advice.

     

    This reply is satire, right? 

     



  • @TheBigYin said:

    This reply is satire, right? 

     

     

    I'd imagine so - I just checked, and Word 2000 doesn't report any grammatical errors in that passage. 



  • @Cloaked User said:

    @TheBigYin said:

    This reply is satire, right? 

     


     

    I'd imagine so - I just checked, and Word 2000 doesn't report any grammatical errors in that passage. 

    The reply was in Babelflish.
     


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