Background check



  • Data Entry
    on Candidate Information Page for Candidates Who Reside
    Internationally<o:p></o:p>

    • Enter actual Date of Birth in DATE OF BIRTH field <o:p></o:p>
    • If you do not have a US-issued Social Security number, enter (9) nine “1”s in the SOCIAL SEC. # field; example: 111-11-1111 <o:p></o:p>
    • Enter your actual international phone number in the PHONE field (non-formatted field) <o:p></o:p>
    • Enter your actual international address in the ADDRESS field including city, province, and country <o:p></o:p>
    • Enter “INTERNATIONAL” in CITY field <o:p></o:p>
    • Enter “ALASKA” in STATE field <o:p></o:p>
    • Enter (5) five “9”s in the ZIP field; example: 99999 <o:p></o:p>
    • Enter any alias names in the ALIAS fields <o:p></o:p>
    • Click the SUBMIT button <o:p></o:p>


  • That's a lot of hoops to jump through.

    But I never knew that I live in Alaska (I'm Non-US)
    That's what I would call "weirder than fiction"...
     



  • Someone is Alaska should make a town called International (bonus points if you cvan get a 99999 zipcode) just to see what happens to this form.



  • @RayS said:

    Someone is Alaska should make a town called International (bonus points if you cvan get a 99999 zipcode) just to see what happens to this form.

    Go there, found the city, and create that zipcode.



  • @dhromed said:

    @RayS said:

    Someone is Alaska should make a town called International (bonus points if you cvan get a 99999 zipcode) just to see what happens to this form.

    Go there, found the city, and create that zipcode.

    See, that's what makes this even more stupid: 99999 could conceivably be a valid Alaska ZIP code.  It's not currently assigned; 99950, for PO Boxes in Ketchikan, AL, is the highest at present.  But what if Ketchikan were to become a booming metropolis and I founded the suburb of International?  Boy would their faces be red!



  • @bstorer said:

    @dhromed said:

    Go there, found the city, and create that zipcode.

    See, that's what makes this even more stupid: 99999 could conceivably be a valid Alaska ZIP code.  It's not currently assigned; 99950, for PO Boxes in Ketchikan, AL, is the highest at present.  But what if Ketchikan were to become a booming metropolis and I founded the suburb of International?  Boy would their faces be red!

    I'm in! Who's with me for this grand adventure?

     



  • (Actually, the instruction for the field "SSN" says "no hypens!", so this cheatsheet gives wrong advice, but I still like the way of explaining that 99999 is an example of (5) five "9"s...)

    What's wrong with the idea of the checkbox "[v] I reside internationally" ?
     



  • They probably just want to see if you're tempted to SQL inject.
    And if so, you fail the background check.
     



  • @qbolec said:

    • Enter (5) five “9”s in the ZIP field; example: 99999

    I like that 99999 is only an example of how to write five '9's in a row. How many other combinations of five '9's are there, which are valid as zipcodes.. ?



  • I'm confused, are you the person who's background is getting checked, or are you entering that person's information into the computer for them?

     In the latter case it's not so ridiculous. Data entry has weird rules on older systems, and "99999" is hopefully a legacy system concept...sounds like a Cobol programmer.



  • @qbolec said:

    (Actually, the instruction for the field "SSN" says "no hypens!", so this cheatsheet gives wrong advice, but I still like the way of explaining that 99999 is an example of (5) five "9"s...)

    What's wrong with the idea of the checkbox "[v] I reside internationally" ?
     

    Well that just makes too much sense.

    Anyway hwhat exactly does "reside internationally" mean? Probably not what they think it does.


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