Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @jaloopa Sure it is! At temperatures higher than -20…



  • Long ago I did quite a bit... Then I bought a 1985 (new) "sports car"...popped the hood, was suitably impressed, and have not touched a car [for maintenance] since, unless immediate and critical need. :)



  • @lorne-kates from your pictures and that grinding noise, you may also have one of those L-shaped warnings. But why did you post pictures of front left, if it is front right you think you have problems with? (Insert blakeyrant here)


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    @mikael_svahnberg said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    one of those L-shaped warnings

    I have always heard them referred to as "squealers", because they squeal to let you know your brakes need servicing when the pads get low.



  • @polygeekery said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    @mikael_svahnberg said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    one of those L-shaped warnings

    I have always heard them referred to as "squealers", because they squeal to let you know your brakes need servicing when the pads get low.

    Except they do not squeal. They sound exactly like a rusty rotor scraping against the caliper. :-)


  • Impossible Mission - B

    @blakeyrat said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    I do my own plumbing though. Partially because it's not very difficult work, and mostly because I've hired about 3 professional plumbers and every single time they did a really shitty job.

    Did they get distracted chasing turtles and mushroom-monsters?


  • Impossible Mission - B

    @anotherusername said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    In the past week, I've seen a car upside down in the opposing lanes of trafficparking lot, and I've seen the car immediately ahead of me to my left have its hood fly up while on the highway. Either of those would've been cool to have on video.

    About a year ago, on the freeway on the way to work, we hit this big slowdown. Eventually we found the bottleneck: there was a car pressed up against the concrete divider in the center of the highway.

    Not crashed. It didn't look the least bit damaged. But it was turned 90 degrees to the divider (and to the flow of traffic) with the front of the car touching or almost touching it. I still have no idea how it was possible to get a car into that position in the first place.



  • @jazzyjosh said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    @raceprouk AFAIK AutoZone does actually give you a replacement set if they wear out.

    No idea what the business model is there. Assume most people lose the receipt? Or maybe they're super cheap to refurbish (just have to strip the old material and put new material on) so they make it a loss leader and eat the refurbishment cost.

    I always assumed that they expect you to pay them for the labor, which is most of the cost of having brakes done anyway. The pads themselves really aren't that expensive.



  • @anotherusername said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    that they expect you to pay them for the labor

    Dammit Jim, I'm an auto parts store not a garage!


  • Fake News

    Another fun bit: Most if not all cars these days have heat, aircon, radio, etc. controls integrated into one touchscreen. Guess what happens when it breaks? It's also apparently difficult to source a replacement screen for older cars, and it's expensive no matter how old the car is.



  • Eventually got my low beams fixed. I had swapped out the bulb, low beams still not working. Swapped out the fuse, low beams still not working. :wtf:?! Took it to a friend who knows more about cars than I do, he showed me how to test the connections all the way from the battery to the bulb... they were all good (we did observe the insulation on a wire on the pigtail was cut but that wire turned out to be for the high beams anyway).

    Pulled the new bulb again, examined it much more closely, found the low beam filament on the BRAND NEW BULB was also broken. Bought two more, swapped them in, and all is well. What are the fucking odds?


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    @heterodox said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    Eventually got my low beams fixed. I had swapped out the bulb, low beams still not working. Swapped out the fuse, low beams still not working. :wtf:?! Took it to a friend who knows more about cars than I do, he showed me how to test the connections all the way from the battery to the bulb... they were all good (we did observe the insulation on a wire on the pigtail was cut but that wire turned out to be for the high beams anyway).

    Pulled the new bulb again, examined it much more closely, found the low beam filament on the BRAND NEW BULB was also broken. Bought two more, swapped them in, and all is well. What are the fucking odds?

    Fairly good. QC ain't great on the chinesium brands, and filaments can break if the packaging is handled roughly.



  • I've started doing my own car work (and home repair) after moving from a condo where doing so isn't really feasible to my own house with a driveway. Here's what I learned so far:

    YouTube is an invaluable resource. Diagrams and manuals are great but it's always good to see people actually do it. Just make sure the person seems professional and knows what he's talking about. I did get burned by replacing a drain after talking tips by a guy who clearly was as novice as me. It was an $800 mistake. Look for the most specific instructional video, too. Sometimes you'll be lucky and find someone doing work on your exact model, and those are awesome.

    Don't let overconfidence screw you over. A mechanic told me I needed new brake pads/rotors and a tire rod. Looking at the instructions for the brake job was easy. Tire rod replacement made me nervous, so I split the difference and let the pros do the tire rod while I did the rest. Saved me a few hundred bucks that way. If you have doubts about your ability to do a good job, err on the side of caution.

    Get the right tools. A simple ratchet set is not going to work. You absolutely need a good torque wrench to loosen and tighten bolts to spec. Anything less will literally break if you try to loosen a sufficiently tightened bolt. And pay attention to those specs. Other tools include extensions, since some bolts are hard to get to. JACKSTANDS OR RAMPS ARE AN ABSOLUTE MUST. The standard for bolts are metric, even for US makes, but get imperial too just in case.

    Get the right parts. There are tons of auto parts sites online. Look for one that lists models that the part fits in. Because sometimes parts vary even among variations of the same year as model (Limited edition) pay close attention to this. If you get the wrong part they will likely have a shotty return policy, where at the very least you have to pay shipping. Check reviews too.

    If you have a Lexus, BMW, Saab, or any other overpriced car designed by assholes for assholes, don't bother with many jobs. You typically need to get genuine parts and special tools that will be super expensive. They are the Apple of cars, and will design things too be serviced by a certified dealer. Plus because they aren't as popular as mid range cars, it's harder to find parts. GM, Ford, and Toyota are good for working on though.



  • @the_quiet_one said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    YouTube is an invaluable resource. Diagrams and manuals are great but it's always good to see people actually do it. Just make sure the person seems professional and knows what he's talking about. I did get burned by replacing a drain after talking tips by a guy who clearly was as novice as me. It was an $800 mistake. Look for the most specific instructional video, too. Sometimes you'll be lucky and find someone doing work on your exact model, and those are awesome.

    It's pretty incredible for what kind of stuff there are YT tutorial videos out there. This summer I had to anchor some stuff into concrete and was presented with a special kind of screw I had never seen before.

    Lo and behold, even for that screw there was a video on how to insert that screw correctly. Worked out just fine.



  • @rhywden said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    @the_quiet_one said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    YouTube is an invaluable resource. Diagrams and manuals are great but it's always good to see people actually do it. Just make sure the person seems professional and knows what he's talking about. I did get burned by replacing a drain after talking tips by a guy who clearly was as novice as me. It was an $800 mistake. Look for the most specific instructional video, too. Sometimes you'll be lucky and find someone doing work on your exact model, and those are awesome.

    It's pretty incredible for what kind of stuff there are YT tutorial videos out there. This summer I had to anchor some stuff into concrete and was presented with a special kind of screw I had never seen before.

    Lo and behold, even for that screw there was a video on how to insert that screw correctly. Worked out just fine.

    One channel I like is Scotty Kilmer. I wouldn't use him for detailed instructions but he is informative about big picture stuff about what it will take and what tools you need. He's also just generally informative about cars, and fun to watch. I'd only use him IN ADDITION to an in depth video though. ChrisFix isn't bad either.


  • Impossible Mission - B

    @rhywden said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    Lo and behold, even for that screw there was a video on how to insert that screw correctly. Worked out just fine.

    Is there something special to it beyond "place screw tip at insertion point, insert screwdriver into screw head, turn until sufficiently tight"? That's been the basic model for every variety of screw I've ever had to work with...



  • @weng said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    Fairly good. QC ain't great on the chinesium brands, and filaments can break if the packaging is handled roughly.

    ... but it's going into a car. One that drives over potholes.

    Sounds like you dodged a bullet, if the lights had worked, they'd have failed again after the first speed bump you went over.



  • @the_quiet_one said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    JACKSTANDS OR RAMPS ARE AN ABSOLUTE MUST.

    Just want to re-iterate: do not work under a car that's only on jacks. Jacks can fail suddenly and without warning.

    Ramps are cheap. Buy a pair.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @blakeyrat Yeah. There's a reason I don't do cheap parts.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    Incidentally, we've been thinking about having some more general DIY content on my car show YouTube thing (launch content is almost ready).

    Nothing make/model specific (unless you happen to have the same crap we're working on), but general education and technique and stuff. Is there actually an audience for that?



  • @weng said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    Incidentally, we've been thinking about having some more general DIY content on my car show YouTube thing (launch content is almost ready).

    Nothing make/model specific (unless you happen to have the same crap we're working on), but general education and technique and stuff. Is there actually an audience for that?

    I'd say so, I'm watching Mustie1's YouTube channel and it's a goldmine for general techniques for fast troubleshooting on small engines and machinery (and some larger stuff). I thought I was pretty clued up but I've learnt a lot of neat tricks. He has a crap ton of subscribers too.



  • @masonwheeler said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    @rhywden said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    Lo and behold, even for that screw there was a video on how to insert that screw correctly. Worked out just fine.

    Is there something special to it beyond "place screw tip at insertion point, insert screwdriver into screw head, turn until sufficiently tight"? That's been the basic model for every variety of screw I've ever had to work with...

    This one required you to drill one centimeter deeper than the screw was long, get all the concrete dust out (very important) and then use a hammer to drive it in, before trying to screw it tight.

    This method was required because it had a metal screw anchor at its end - by using the hammer you'd drive the screw anchor into the hole. When you then screwed it in, the metal anchor would inflate thus anchoring the screw into the concrete. And you'd need to get all the dust out because otherwise it'd act as a lubricant, letting the anchor turn uselessly in its place instead of inflating.

    Your method works fine for wood. Not so much with concrete. Also, those screws are expensive. Two Euros apiece if I remember correctly.



  • @blakeyrat

    I second the ramps.

    However, a quality set of jack stands will also work fine. Never just use a jack, it will eventually slip on you.



  • @rhywden

    Those arn't screws those are concrete anchors.



  • @dragoon said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    @rhywden

    Those arn't screws those are concrete anchors.

    0_1506971351134_6d797f7c-dd80-44e7-94d9-a94a3f61dd58-image.png

    Whatever. It has a screw and thus belongs into the screw section. Which is precisely where we found them in the hardware store.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @rhywden this reminds me I still need to bolt my air compressor to the garage floor.

    It walks about 3 feet a year.



  • @weng said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    Incidentally, we've been thinking about having some more general DIY content on my car show YouTube thing (launch content is almost ready).

    Nothing make/model specific (unless you happen to have the same crap we're working on), but general education and technique and stuff. Is there actually an audience for that?

    Absolutely. It doesn't have to be specific to a car to be useful. Plus certain things like brake pads and rotors, or spark plugs, or oil changes are going to be very universal. The specific stuff you can still find without video on car forums, too. Even if you wanted to walk someone through, say, an engine overhaul or transmission replacement, it might be interesting, although personally I'd look at it and say, "Yup, I'll let someone else do that."


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    @rhywden said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    This one required you to drill one centimeter deeper than the screw was long, get all the concrete dust out (very important) and then use a hammer to drive it in, before trying to screw it tight.
    This method was required because it had a metal screw anchor at its end - by using the hammer you'd drive the screw anchor into the hole. When you then screwed it in, the metal anchor would inflate thus anchoring the screw into the concrete. And you'd need to get all the dust out because otherwise it'd act as a lubricant, letting the anchor turn uselessly in its place instead of inflating.
    Your method works fine for wood. Not so much with concrete. Also, those screws are expensive. Two Euros apiece if I remember correctly.

    Sounds like what I have always called "Red heads". Expanding anchors. I have only ever had one of them fail. It failed at the only time it ever would have caused damage. $2500 worth of damage.

    Murphy's Law and all that. I can explain further if anyone is interested.


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    @rhywden said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    @dragoon said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    @rhywden

    Those arn't screws those are concrete anchors.

    0_1506971351134_6d797f7c-dd80-44e7-94d9-a94a3f61dd58-image.png

    Whatever. It has a screw and thus belongs into the screw section. Which is precisely where we found them in the hardware store.

    Yep. Red heads.


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    @Polygeekery said in Modern Incomes, Modern Expenses. How the hell do you make them add up?:

    Well, that was not what I was intending to quote...

    Water pump replacement went entirely sideways. When I was installing the water pump I had one of those "well, that went on easier than expected" moments. Come to find out that the o-ring had rolled instead of working as it should have. Due to that I had to tear the entire engine down again and replace the o-ring. Fucking hell, that took more than twice the amount of time it should have.



  • @weng said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    Fairly good. QC ain't great on the chinesium brands, and filaments can break if the packaging is handled roughly.

    I don't think Sylvania is a Chinesium brand. But in any case, quiet you; I'm trying to make it sound like the problem was external rather than "Haha, of course it was the bulb; idiot just didn't check well enough!"



  • @polygeekery said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    Come to find out that the o-ring had rolled instead of working as it should have. Due to that I had to tear the entire engine down again and replace the o-ring. Fucking hell, that took more than twice the amount of time it should have.

    This seems like a pretty standard part of most of my DIY projects. At least the first time. Occasionally I learn from it and don't do it the next time, though.


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    @boomzilla said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    This seems like a pretty standard part of most of my DIY projects. At least the first time. Occasionally I learn from it and don't do it the next time, though.

    Yeah, but I have done this job before. On the 2UZ-FE engines you have to do timing belt and water pump on 90K intervals. We now have two vehicles with that exact same engine.

    I initially thought it was much worse. After I got everything back together (List of things I had to remove to do this job: alternator, power steering pump, a/c compressor, idler puller, serpentine belt tensioner, radiator, fan, skid plate, harmonic balancer, reluctor plate, cam position sensor, more things I am probably forgetting) I started it up and brought it up to temperature and everything looked fine. When I shut the engine off water started pouring from the back of the block from what appeared to be inside the bellhousing where the engine attaches to the transmission. This is exactly what you would see if the block is cracked or some other catastrophic failure.

    Closer inspection showed that it was coming from the aforementioned tube and then running between the intake manifold and engine block to the rear of the engine and then to the ground. So it was a relief, but still meant I had to tear the entire front of the engine apart again.



  • @polygeekery said in Lorne (and others) attempt to make expensive death-machines not-not work!:

    List of things I had to remove to do this job: alternator, power steering pump, a/c compressor, idler puller, serpentine belt tensioner, radiator, fan, skid plate, harmonic balancer, reluctor plate, cam position sensor, more things I am probably forgetting

    Flux capacitor, probably.

    At least, it would make as much sense to me if that was in the list.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @heterodox Yeah, they have a plant in town here.

    China would be better 🇨🇳


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