Is this a dragon? DO NOT POST PORN WHAT THE FUCK IS WRONG WITH YOU STOP STOP STOP IT



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  • Ok I've done the wyvern thing with Ben before, but here it is for the whole crowd:

    Wyvern is a bit of heraldry. I've seen ZERO evidence that, before Tolkien popularized (or re-popularized) the fantasy genre (and probably before Dungeons and Dragons made a monster out of literally anything), anybody has referred to a wyvern as a fantasy creature and not just an icon used in heraldry. The idea of there being a creature called a "wyvern" is a modern invention, and not part of any mythology.

    Additionally dragons have been shown with two or four legs as far back as you go. St. George fought this thing:

    0_1504213193042_Saint_George_and_the_Dragon_by_Paolo_Uccello_Paris_01.jpg

    Bam. Count those legs, motherfuckers!

    The point is:

    1. Wyverns are lame
    2. Dragons are cool
    3. Dragons can have zero, two, or four legs
    4. Quetzalcoatl is a dragon
    5. Ben L thinks puppies can fly

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    @blakeyrat I always wondered that myself. It has the shape of a dragon, the head of a dog with Down's Syndrome and fur on some parts of its body and scales on others. Of course, that movie came out in 1984 and people did a lot of cocaine back then. That has to have something to do with it.



  • @blakeyrat said in Is this a dragon?:

    Ok I've done the wyvern thing with Ben before, but here it is for the whole crowd:

    Wyvern is a bit of heraldry. I've seen ZERO evidence that, before Tolkien popularized (or re-popularized) the fantasy genre, anybody has referred to a wyvern as a fantasy creature and not just an icon used in heraldry. The idea of there being a creature called a "wyvern" is a modern invention, and not part of any mythology.

    Additionally dragons have been shown with two or four legs as far back as you go. St. George fought this thing:

    0_1504213193042_Saint_George_and_the_Dragon_by_Paolo_Uccello_Paris_01.jpg

    Bam. Count those legs, motherfuckers!

    The point is:

    1. Wyverns are lame
    2. Dragons are cool
    3. Dragons can have zero, two, or four legs
    4. Quetzalcoatl is a dragon
    5. Ben L thinks puppies can fly

    Wyvern ⊂ Dragon



  • @polygeekery He self-identifies as a dragon.


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    @blakeyrat said in Is this a dragon?:

    @polygeekery He self-identifies as a dragon.


  • SockDev

    @blakeyrat said in Is this a dragon?:

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    Whatever he is, he's more of a dragon than this 'dragon':



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  • @raceprouk But less cute. Though admittedly I only know anything about one of these images (Falcor).



  • Difficulty++:

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  • Shadowrun solved that one with distinguishing between Eastern and Western Dragons.


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  • Dragon: No.

    Loch Ness Monster: Yes.



  • @blakeyrat Is this a dagger I see before me?

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    OK, that's a bit too obscure a joke, really. See here for context. Also, check the SotD thread today.



  • @blakeyrat It self identifies as a Dragon Tank.



  • @blakeyrat said in Is this a dragon?:

    1. Quetzalcoatl is a dragon

    ACtually — adjusts glasses — it is a feathered serpent.

    @ben_lubar said in Is this a dragon?:

    It's a puppy!

    It reminds me of a Chinese dragon, kind of.


  • BINNED

    @blakeyrat said in Is this a dragon?:

    St. George fought this thing:

    0_1504213193042_Saint_George_and_the_Dragon_by_Paolo_Uccello_Paris_01.jpg

    I've once heard an interesting hypothesis about the whole St. George thing. It is likely that the event that started the myth involved one of the several species of monitor lizards:

    The interesting thing about monitor lizards is that they have forked tongues, which they use for smelling just like snakes do. They also can get pretty large, and likely could be a pain in the ass to deal with. Combine that with a creature Europeans never saw before, and the word "dragon" is likely to be uttered.

    I mentioned forked tongues, and there was a reason: even if the first graphical representation of the event was 100% exact, it's easy to see how subsequent artists who were inspired by that work might confuse the long, forked tongue for representation of flames, since they likely never saw a lizard with a forked tongue, and it's clearly not a snake since it has legs. Add on to that the human inclination to make the story bigger and more interesting, and the dragon became larger and larger in each new painting.

    And there you go, a couple of centuries later you get St. George fighting a huge, fire breathing dragon. While, in fact, it was quite possibly just a pissed off monitor lizard.



  • @onyx I think that it is futile to try and find the "one true representation" of the dragon fought by St George. There are many legends about saints fighting dragons, I think St Michael also did (undefined he's not a saint, he's an archangel...), there is at least one city in the south of France that has a local legend of a dragon (locally named as the Tarasque, but it's as much a dragon as the one fought by St George) and I've heard of several other similar local legends. I'd be tempted to put some older legends such as Hercules and the Lernean Hydra, or some Celtic legends as variations of this as well.

    As far as I remember stuff that I read about that, much of the early legends on those things are really only about someone fighting a "monster", of an unspecified variety (except that it is not your standard giant bear/wolf/boar or other known animal). It is only as time goes by that this monster (which might have a specific local name or not) becomes a "dragon", and gets specific characteristics, the most notable and common one being the serpent-like overall aspects (with or without legs). There are representations, old and less old, where the dragon is a snake, nothing more. The number of legs, the fire breathing and the rest are just stuff that gets added as the story is told and retold...

    I'd be interested to know at which point the monsters became specifically "dragons", though. As I said, there are sometimes local names that survive up until now and I'm pretty sure it would have been the same for all legends. Not sure how they became "dragons" (and how that word itself got invented, since it obviously never referred to a real thing!).


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