31 days of February



  • As factual as this document published by the Center for Disease Control is, somehow the New York Times article they are quoting just doesn't seem to have been published quite on the date that they specified.  See the red underlined (as close as I could come with my shaky mouse) section, live URL after the pic.

    Remember:

     "Thirty days hath September,
    April, June, and November,
    All the rest have thirty-one,
    Excepting February alone,
    Which has but twenty-eight days clear
    And twenty-nine in each leap year.

    feb 31, according to the CDC

     


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    "Thirty-one" rhymes with "alone"?  I guess you have to either say "thirty-woan" or "alun"...



  • @joe.edwards@imaginuity.com said:

    "Thirty-one" rhymes with "alone"?  I guess you have to either say "thirty-woan" or "alun"...

    I take no credit for crappy rhyming schemes.  This is what "about.com" came up with:



  • I keep this message in the corner of my whiteboard, and no one has said anything yet:

    IS IT DONE YET?
    <FONT color="#ff0000">No, but I'll let you
    know when it is!</FONT>
    <FONT color="#f27600">ETA: 2/30</FONT>



  • Thirty days have Salo, Niles, June, and September,

    Winston, Chrono, Kazak, and November,

    April, Rumfoord, Newport, and Infundibulum.

    All the rest, baby mine, have thirty-one.

     



  • When is Feburary?



  • The real WTF is that you are still using IE6. Shame on you.



  • @RaspenJho said:

    When is Feburary?

    ROFL! Nice catch!

    My mother tells a story of getting into a fight with her English teacher when she was in grade school about the spelling of February. My mother insisted to the teacher that it was spelled with two R's, the first one coming right after the 'b', but it wasn't until she showed the teacher the dictionary entry for the word that the teacher finally relented and agreed with my mother's correct spelling of the word.  Granted, this was rural Ohio that she grew up in, but still, it was an English teacher!

    BTW, anyone else notice the other numerous errors in the two preceding paragraphs as well? "cial" (probably meant civil), and "presently quality" (which in no way fits the sentence)

    I'm glad to see my tax dollars going to such worthy causes as employing the unemployable "public relations professional;" a term a use quite loosely in this case.
     



  • @joe.edwards@imaginuity.com said:

    "Thirty-one" rhymes with "alone"?  I guess you have to either say "thirty-woan" or "alun"...

    They're called slant rhymes, if I'm remembering high school literature correctly. They're meant to be "visual" rhymes instead of audible ones; I agree it's a totally stupid poet cop-out, but English teachers seem to love them.



  • @aftli said:

    The real WTF is that you are still using IE6. Shame on you.

    actually, that's yet another MS WTF.  I can't for some reason seem to run any updates and so I can't get IE7 to install.  Their error message:  "a problem has occurred installing these updates."  Yeah.  thanks for that really informative tip, MS.  no error code #, no error log entry, just "a problem has occurred" . 

    if I can only find the time to reinstall to fix it. 



  • @foxyshadis said:

    @joe.edwards@imaginuity.com said:

    "Thirty-one" rhymes with "alone"?  I guess you have to either say "thirty-woan" or "alun"...

    They're called slant rhymes, if I'm remembering high school literature correctly. They're meant to be "visual" rhymes instead of audible ones; I agree it's a totally stupid poet cop-out, but English teachers seem to love them.



    I imagine that in many cases the words did at some point rhyme, but shifting of English pronunciations destroyed the rhyme. Then later poets copied it, thinking the missed rhyme was intentional.



  • @pauluskc said:

    @aftli said:

    The real WTF is that you are still using IE6. Shame on you.

    actually, that's yet another MS WTF.  I can't for some reason seem to run any updates and so I can't get IE7 to install.  Their error message:  "a problem has occurred installing these updates."  Yeah.  thanks for that really informative tip, MS.  no error code #, no error log entry, just "a problem has occurred" . 

    if I can only find the time to reinstall to fix it. 

     

    So (to the best of your knowledge) you are having an isolated problem with your computer. You ignore the fact that millions of Windows machines out there update correctly. And somehow you blame Microsoft, and not the end user, or the software you have likely installed since then, or the configuration changes you have made?

    I would love to see the magical software you write!

    You might not be as perfect as you think you are.



  • @RaspenJho said:

    When is Feburary?

    Just before Smarch...

     



  • @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    So (to the best of your knowledge) you are having an isolated problem with your computer. You ignore the fact that millions of Windows machines out there update correctly. And somehow you blame Microsoft, and not the end user, or the software you have likely installed since then, or the configuration changes you have made?



    Um, yes I would blame Microsoft. How does the fact that the problem is rare make it any less of Microsoft's fault? IE7 won't install for him. That's a bug, his configurations are irrelevant, an installer should be able to handle previous configurations and update them to the new version (or let the user know if they're no longer valid). IE doesn't depend on any other software (except for Windows itself), so it should not be hindered by the existance of any other software (if it is, that's a bug).

    Now, it may be that fixing those bugs are not important enough to get Microsoft's attention, but they're still bugs.



  • @pauluskc said:

    @aftli said:

    The real WTF is that you are still using IE6. Shame on you.

    actually, that's yet another MS WTF.  I can't for some reason seem to run any updates and so I can't get IE7 to install.  Their error message:  "a problem has occurred installing these updates."  Yeah.  thanks for that really informative tip, MS.  no error code #, no error log entry, just "a problem has occurred" . 

    if I can only find the time to reinstall to fix it. 

    Ever heard about non-IE browsers, such as Firefox or Opera?
     



  • @pauluskc said:

    @aftli said:

    The real WTF is that you are still using IE6. Shame on you.

    actually, that's yet another MS WTF.  I can't for some reason seem to run any updates and so I can't get IE7 to install.  Their error message:  "a problem has occurred installing these updates."  Yeah.  thanks for that really informative tip, MS.  no error code #, no error log entry, just "a problem has occurred" . 

    if I can only find the time to reinstall to fix it. 

    The event viewer (eventvrw.msc) typically has real error codes. Yeah, it sucks having no reference numbers in forward facing error pages, but some people freak out and have a mental shutdown when they see lots of numbers like that.

    I wouldn't piss on the guy just because windows updates broke, that happens surprisingly often, especially if you like to tinker or actually care about securing your system/network. But even just for totally random reasons (usually OEM-install related in my experience) at times.



  • @SuperousOxide said:

    @foxyshadis said:

    @joe.edwards@imaginuity.com said:

    "Thirty-one" rhymes with "alone"? I guess you have to either say "thirty-woan" or "alun"...

    They're called slant rhymes, if I'm remembering high school literature correctly. They're meant to be "visual" rhymes instead of audible ones; I agree it's a totally stupid poet cop-out, but English teachers seem to love them.


    I imagine that in many cases the words did at some point rhyme, but shifting of English pronunciations destroyed the rhyme. Then later poets copied it, thinking the missed rhyme was intentional.

    It's also possible that employers of inexact rhyme (who need not be poets, the former being neither necessary nor sufficient qualification for the latter) are sometimes addressing audiences with aesthetic sensibility just [i]slightly[/i] more sophisticated than that of a three-year-old reciting a nursery rhyme.

    I'm surprised all the top prosody scholars here didn't address that possibility.  Perhaps some posters are merely airing their half-assed opinions on subjects they have never studied in any depth?  Why, I can scarcely credit the notion!





  • @MichaelWojcik said:

    It's also possible that employers of inexact rhyme (who need not be poets, the former being neither necessary nor sufficient qualification for the latter) are sometimes addressing audiences with aesthetic sensibility just [i]slightly[/i] more sophisticated than that of a three-year-old reciting a nursery rhyme.

    I'm surprised all the top prosody scholars here didn't address that possibility.  Perhaps some posters are merely airing their half-assed opinions on subjects they have never studied in any depth?  Why, I can scarcely credit the notion!



    Hey, I like to give them the benefit of the doubt. But you're right. It could just be they don't know how to rhyme.



  • @MichaelWojcik said:

    It's also possible that employers of inexact rhyme (who need not be poets, the former being neither necessary nor sufficient qualification for the latter) are sometimes addressing audiences with aesthetic sensibility just [i]slightly[/i] more sophisticated than that of a three-year-old reciting a nursery rhyme.

    I'm surprised all the top prosody scholars here didn't address that possibility.  Perhaps some posters are merely airing their half-assed opinions on subjects they have never studied in any depth?  Why, I can scarcely credit the notion!

     I've usually found that rhyme gets in the way of poetry.

    The biggest mistakes of amateur poets make are using trite rhymes (ones where you can predict the next line by the word used to end the previous line), and forgetting about rhythm. Still, if read at a funeral, everyone there will have a look of suitably genuine pain.



  • @robbak said:

    I've usually found that rhyme gets in the way of poetry.

    The biggest mistakes of amateur poets make are using trite rhymes (ones where you can predict the next line by the word used to end the previous line), and forgetting about rhythm. Still, if read at a funeral, everyone there will have a look of suitably genuine pain.

    Metre is often forgotten.

    Dear poets,
    Putting linebreaks in your text does not make it poetry!
    - W



  • @dhromed said:

    @robbak said:
    I've usually found that rhyme gets in the way of poetry.

    The biggest mistakes of amateur poets make are using trite rhymes (ones where you can predict the next line by the word used to end the previous line), and forgetting about rhythm. Still, if read at a funeral, everyone there will have a look of suitably genuine pain.

    Metre is often forgotten.

    Dear poets,
    Putting linebreaks in your text does not make it poetry!
    - W

     

    haha, the emo style of poetry (you know it's deep because it starts with "I" and ends with "you"):

    I
    cuting biting,
    chew
    FOREVER longing to
    brew
    A love so deap and true.
    but no.
         Hateing
              screeming
         yelling - weeping
    biting my nails.
    I want
    you.

     

    On the other hand.  Making a sentence look right is often important in good poetry.  Visual rhymes can be employed instead of actual rhyme for instance. 



  • @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    So (to the best of your knowledge) you are having an isolated problem with your computer. You ignore the fact that millions of Windows machines out there update correctly. And somehow you blame Microsoft, and not the end user, or the software you have likely installed since then, or the configuration changes you have made?

    I would love to see the magical software you write!

    You might not be as perfect as you think you are.

     Yes you MS Fanboy, yes I would blame MS. First off, he was complaining mainly about the fact the microsoft did not offer a more detailed error message besides 'an error occured.' Pray tell, would any good programmer ever, ever, do that? I know I would never. IE is independant of other programs, only relies upon Windows. If he has altered the configurations to where they don't work it should inform in of that, specificaly where.

    Before you decided that you're all high and mighty. Look down and find the facts first.



  • Federal Funcis?



  • @DWalker59 said:

    Federal Funcis?

    Federal Funci Muncis, I presume.

     



  • @viraptor said:

    Google rulez once again:

    http://www.google.com/search?q="february+31+1900..2500"&btnG=Search 

    I think there's a lot of software out there that converts string dates to numbers beginning with January = 1,

     

    And an equal amount that prints out date strings from numbers beginning with January = 0.

     

    I
    believe we even had a post about it recently in a database
    context.  A lot of orgs keep their press releases in a database.



  • @MichaelWojcik said:

    @SuperousOxide said:

    @foxyshadis said:

    @joe.edwards@imaginuity.com said:

    "Thirty-one" rhymes with "alone"? I guess you have to either say "thirty-woan" or "alun"...

    They're called slant rhymes, if I'm remembering high school literature correctly. They're meant to be "visual" rhymes instead of audible ones; I agree it's a totally stupid poet cop-out, but English teachers seem to love them.


    I imagine that in many cases the words did at some point rhyme, but shifting of English pronunciations destroyed the rhyme. Then later poets copied it, thinking the missed rhyme was intentional.

    It's also possible that employers of inexact rhyme (who need not be poets, the former being neither necessary nor sufficient qualification for the latter) are sometimes addressing audiences with aesthetic sensibility just [i]slightly[/i] more sophisticated than that of a three-year-old reciting a nursery rhyme.

    I'm surprised all the top prosody scholars here didn't address that possibility.  Perhaps some posters are merely airing their half-assed opinions on subjects they have never studied in any depth?  Why, I can scarcely credit the notion!

    Could be that as far as I'm concerned the book reading of poetry is usually a degenerate activity, and only find poetry recital entertaining in the slightest, whether it's slam or a cozy sit-down reading. But I suppose that's much too physical an activity for someone of your obvious intellectual acumen. (I know others find visual poetry interesting, that's fine for them, but 'aesthetic sensibility'?)


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