Audio and Linux


  • area_can

    @bb36e said in 2018 won't be the year of Linux on desktop and it's @boomzilla's fault:

    Someone remind me in a bit to install gnome so I can compare how it's changed. Last I remember it was a real pain to navigate, but maybe it's because I'm used to window tiling.

    Just finished installing Debian with GNOME (the default DE). Wireless didn't work out of the box, because I'm using Debian and I should have the freedom to download non-free drivers manually whenever I want. Whatever, I use Debian daily so I'm used to this shit. I guess I'm a masochist.

    1. I'm getting an annoying hiss that isn't affected by the volume slider.
    2. There is no systemwide equalizer available out of the box. I bought a nice pair of bassy headphones, so I want some skull-rattling shit.
      1. There is pulseaudio-equalizer, but it's old/unsupported and also has really annoying stutter and lag.
      2. There's pulseeffects, which is new and seems to have more filters and features. Neither of these two are available in the repos, so I have to try and install from source. Unfortunately, the distro version of gstreamer is too old to install it.
    3. On my usual debian install, I have an equalizer running in ALSA, and it "works", but the output can be too quiet sometimes because the preamp plugin doesn't seem to work with the equalizer for some reason.
    4. JACK provides a proper EQ but keeping it running means I have to keep some window open all the time. And firefox (inb4 tr undefined is firefox) doesn't play sound if I inject JACK between pulse and alsa.
      • this is actually FF's fault. they made pulse a hard dependency earlier this year. The only real reason I'm using FF is because it has a tab organizer addon and mouse gestures that aren't hacky and broken like the extensions available in chrome.

    Man, audio on Linux as an end user sucks. I really can't see how people say 'X is the year of linux on the desktop!!'.

    oh well. time to play some tank shooty games.



  • @bb36e said in Audio and Linux:

    I really can't see how people say 'X is the year of linux on the desktop!!'.

    They say it because if they say it often enough, their children will pick up the slogan soon enough and repeat it to their children, and some generation could conceivably eventually reach the right year.



  • @bb36e said in Audio and Linux:

    I'm getting an annoying hiss that isn't affected by the volume slider.

    /gets flashbacks about having to run alsamixer on a command line because pulseaudio UI would set hardware levels to max (maximizing noise) and only change a software level.



  • @zecc alsamixer at least isn't that bad from my experience. I've had to run it because the center/subwoofer channel was muted by default on my computer, even when setting speakers to 5.1, which is a proper undefined.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @atazhaia said in Audio and Linux:

    @zecc alsamixer at least isn't that bad from my experience. I've had to run it because the center/subwoofer channel was muted by default on my computer, even when setting speakers to 5.1, which is a proper undefined.

    It was fun, because apparently by default on one of my IBM tablets the default configuration turns on loopback of the mic to the speakers, so unless headphones are plugged in, you're going to have an ear-piercing squeal until you can go in and fix it. Luckily I was able to figure out how to save the profile so it applied that instead of the default on boot, but man alive... Not a good thing to happen at 1am in the morning...



  • Did you try pavucontrol? The last time I had an audio issue I could control pulseaudio with that. In all other cases i use alsamixer because for me that's least effort.


  • Banned

    Linux distributions have a lot to offer and some are geared more towards certain tasks than others. There is nothing wrong with stock distributions, and any distro can be tweaked to work well for whichever task you wish, provided that you know how to tailor them to that specific task. If you are working with audio, however, choosing a distro specifically geared towards that purpose can save you a lot of hassle. [URL removed - @pjh]


  • Dupa

    @zain-malik said in Audio and Linux:

    Linux distributions have a lot to offer and some are geared more towards certain tasks than others. There is nothing wrong with stock distributions, and any distro can be tweaked to work well for whichever task you wish, provided that you know how to tailor them to that specific task. If you are working with audio, however, choosing a distro specifically geared towards that purpose can save you a lot of hassle. [URL removed - @pjh]

    2018 might not turn out to be the year of Linux on desktop, but it certainly will continue the tradition of 2017, making it the year of spammers on NodeBB.


    Filed under: almost forgot: fuck you

    @mods, do thy duty.


  • Dupa

    @kt_ it's cool that when @PJH removed the URL from the OP it also got removed from the quote in my post.

    NodeBB is a classy piece of software!




  • Dupa

    @pjh said in Audio and Linux:

    @kt_ undefined

    Instead of undefined you should better post a screenshot of this awesome admin menu option that made this happen!

    Or did you run search-replace on the DB?

    sudo mongodb console
    ctrl + h
    <OLDURL> <NEWURL>

    MongoDB is cool!



  • @kt_ I edited both posts manually. On mobile.


  • Dupa

    @pjh said in Audio and Linux:

    @kt_ I edited both posts manually.

    I knew that, was just joking. Seems I Poed it.

    On mobile.

    Ouch. You should get a medal or something.


  • SockDev

    @pjh said in Audio and Linux:

    I edited both posts manually. On mobile.

    What, do you want a freakin' medal?

    Pssht. Kids today…

    😛


  • area_can

    @zain-malik said in Audio and Linux:

    Linux distributions have a lot to offer and some are geared more towards certain tasks than others. There is nothing wrong with stock distributions, and any distro can be tweaked to work well for whichever task you wish, provided that you know how to tailor them to that specific task. If you are working with audio, however, choosing a distro specifically geared towards that purpose can save you a lot of hassle. [URL removed - @pjh]

    OMG are you the guy from 1 direction?!


  • SockDev

    @pjh said in Audio and Linux:

    @kt_ I edited both posts manually. On mobile.

    Your user name is clearly an initialism for P. J. Hero!


  • SockDev

    @bb36e the only direction he's following is outta here because banned.


  • SockDev

    @arantor said in Audio and Linux:

    @bb36e the only direction he's following is outta here because banned.

    To be fair, that is one direction 😛



  • 0_1501358173650_d72e3483-3ff3-4209-9d5a-b8d149f57f7d-image.png

    I have this shit on Debian + XFCE. Seems to be working.

    I use linux in a VM for work mostly, so I don't need multimedia. I don't know how robust this is. Hope I never have to find out.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @raceprouk said in Audio and Linux:

    @pjh said in Audio and Linux:

    I edited both posts manually. On mobile.

    What, do you want a freakin' medal?

    Pssht. Kids today…

    😛

    Yeah! Give him a badge instead!


  • SockDev

    @tsaukpaetra said in Audio and Linux:

    Yeah! Give him a badge instead!

    NO! BADGES MINE! MINE!

    runs away with all the badges



  • @raceprouk I thought that hedgehogs didn't get along with undefineds?


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @benjamin-hall said in Audio and Linux:

    @raceprouk I thought that hedgehogs didn't get along with undefineds?

    I wasn't going to mention it! 😛

    Your death.


  • SockDev

    @benjamin-hall said in Audio and Linux:

    @raceprouk I thought that hedgehogs didn't get along with undefineds?

    Nasty icky undefineds, always digging into my burrows undefined

    undefineds don't do that: undefineds just look pretty.

    undefined > undefined



  • I’m using the latest Fedora, and I have to say the sound got good. I use a USB headset and it’s no problem to route sound from the integrated card there when I plug it in. The mic works, and switching is transparent.

    That said, I’m sold to PulseAudio mostly.

    It’s as robust as it is on macOS, as far as I can say.

    I don’t do music production on Linux though, and I hear every platform has... “nuances” when it comes to this. Everyone seems to have a setup tweaked to a detail but fragile as fuck at the same time.


  • SockDev

    In comparison, on Windows, sound just works. It just does.



  • @raceprouk I had an add-in sound card (for an output my motherboard didn't supply) that occasionally wouldn't load the driver on system startup and required a reboot. But that's Creative Labs issue (for which they're notorious). The built-in sound works without a problem.


  • SockDev

    @raceprouk said in Audio and Linux:

    In comparison, on Windows, sound just works. It just does.

    with pulseaudio on linux i can split my left and right audio channels into two output streams and then duplicate those two mono streams into stereo then send the signal with the two left channels to my left hand monitor and the signal with the two right channels to my right hand monitor. and it Just WorksTM

    I've yet to find a way to do that with windows.

    so NYA! 😛


  • kills Dumbledore

    @accalia said in Audio and Linux:

    with pulseaudio on linux i can split my left and right audio channels into two output streams and then duplicate those two mono streams into stereo then send the signal with the two left channels to my left hand monitor and the signal with the two right channels to my right hand monitor. and it Just WorksTM

    I can do a lot of things that there's no need to ever do as well


  • SockDev

    @jaloopa said in Audio and Linux:

    @accalia said in Audio and Linux:

    with pulseaudio on linux i can split my left and right audio channels into two output streams and then duplicate those two mono streams into stereo then send the signal with the two left channels to my left hand monitor and the signal with the two right channels to my right hand monitor. and it Just WorksTM

    I can do a lot of things that there's no need to ever do as well

    no need to? so when you have multiple monitors with decent speakers in you choose to use only one of them for audio output?

    Jaloopa 🇮🇸 undefined

    🦊😝


  • kills Dumbledore

    @accalia ahh, I see the confusion now.

    Monitors are for display. The things for sound are called speakers


  • SockDev

    @jaloopa said in Audio and Linux:

    @accalia ahh, I see the confusion now.

    Monitors are for display. The things for sound are called speakers

    Monitors have speakers built in these days. often quite decent ones.

    why would i use external speakers when speakers of simmilar quality are already integrated into my monitors?

    do you want me to waste money on unecessary peripherals?


  • kills Dumbledore

    @accalia you can do what you want


  • SockDev

    @jaloopa said in Audio and Linux:

    @accalia you can do what you want

    that answers my second question, but not my frist.


  • SockDev

    @accalia said in Audio and Linux:

    do you want me to waste money on unecessary peripherals?

    How many machines do you have at home again? 😛


  • SockDev

    @raceprouk said in Audio and Linux:

    @accalia said in Audio and Linux:

    do you want me to waste money on unecessary peripherals?

    How many machines do you have at home again? 😛

    /me starts counting

    one...

    two...

    bananananana......

    Two by Six....

    weird squidgy blob...

    Strange and suspicious stain....

    Seventeen.

    Two to the power of tow hundred seventy six thousand, seven hundred and nine to one against.

    The smell of rain....

    Triangle!

    I have triangle machines at home



  • @accalia said in Audio and Linux:

    Monitors have speakers built in these days.

    My monitors at home don't, although annoyingly one of them says it does (I think the official reason is to allow pass-through, for whatever reason you'd want that)

    often quite decent ones.

    [citation needed]

    I've never seen monitor speakers any better than laptop speakers. Even the cheapest real speakers sound better.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @accalia said in Audio and Linux:

    multiple monitors with decent speakers

    DNE


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @accalia said in Audio and Linux:

    I have triangle machines at home

    Including the non-functional/not in use, I have 7 desktops, 17 laptops, six tablets, 7 phones, 8 compute sticks (or other similar form factor), 5 kit PC boards (i.e. rPi, Latte Panda), 1 HoloLens, 2 Color LaserJet printers (both HP), 9 routers, 4 Gigabit switches, 1 100Mb switch, 1 Oculus Rift (with touch controllers), 5 UPS backup units.

    The above inventory is approximately 98% accurate, and is only inclusive of my stuff (my dad has all the woodworking, mechanics, etc. tools).


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    @accalia said in Audio and Linux:

    speakers of simmilar quality

    [Citation needed]

    ETA: undefined 👶 why won't you scroll to the actual bottom before stopping anymore



  • @hungrier said in Audio and Linux:

    My monitors at home don't, although annoyingly one of them says it does (I think the official reason is to allow pass-through, for whatever reason you'd want that)

    I use it to split out the audio signal from the Xbox's HDMI signal into the monitor, which I can then feed back out into my PC's "line in" port and then mix (using the "listen to" functionality in the sound control panel) the game audio with PC audio to a single headset/speakers for when I'm playing Xbox and chatting with buddies on Skype or whatever.

    The monitor's output is only stereo, though, so I lose 7.1 doing it this way.

    But anyway: yes I do want that feature, and I was disappointed that my newer 4k Dell monitor did not have it. (Although, to be fair, not because speaker pass-through, which I give no shits for, but because it can split the audio signal out of a HDMI signal.)


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @raceprouk said in Audio and Linux:

    In comparison, on Windows, sound just works. It just does.

    Unless you want to output sound to two devices at the same time.



  • @polygeekery said in Audio and Linux:

    Unless you want to output sound to two devices at the same time.

    That's trivial. I think you can't possibly mean what you said, because there are tons of apps (like Skype for example) that do this BY DEFAULT. (Rings go to one device, voice communication to another.)


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @blakeyrat said in Audio and Linux:

    @polygeekery said in Audio and Linux:

    Unless you want to output sound to two devices at the same time.

    That's trivial. I think you can't possibly mean what you said, because there are tons of apps (like Skype for example) that do this BY DEFAULT. (Rings go to one device, voice communication to another.)

    I mean exactly what I said. I did not even forget to type a word this time. Try to output sound to two different devices at the exact same time. Same audio to two devices.

    We ran in to that while setting up LCD TVs for a client that does trainings. You would think that you could mirror displays and run sound to both of them. Nope. Only one would output sound.


  • SockDev

    @polygeekery said in Audio and Linux:

    Same audio to two devices.

    You want one app to send sound to two devices?



  • @polygeekery said in Audio and Linux:

    I mean exactly what I said. I did not even forget to type a word this time. Try to output sound to two different devices at the exact same time.

    Ok, done. Trivial. Set Audacity to play through headset, YouTube to play through default device (speakers). Bam. I'm outputting sound to two different device at the exact same time.

    Because you're so adamant you typed exactly what you meant, I'm going to stop reading your post here. Because I just proved your stupid-intercourse-ass wrong.



  • @raceprouk said in Audio and Linux:

    You want one app to send sound to two devices?

    That's also trivial.

    I think what he meant is to send the same audio stream to two different output devices simultaneously, which is slightly more difficult-- an app can be trivially programmed to do that, of course, but most apps aren't. Windows doesn't have a way to "link" output devices into one virtual device, but you can install drivers like VAC that do.

    But he's adamant he typed what he meant, so by his own words he's just plain wrong.


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @blakeyrat you are a robot.


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @blakeyrat said in Audio and Linux:

    I think what he meant is to send the same audio stream to two different output devices simultaneously, which is slightly more difficult-- an app can be trivially programmed to do that, of course, but most apps aren't

    Apps like WMP. You retard.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @polygeekery said in Audio and Linux:

    @blakeyrat you are a robot.

    No, he's a rat.

    @polygeekery said in Audio and Linux:

    @blakeyrat said in Audio and Linux:

    I think what he meant is to send the same audio stream to two different output devices simultaneously, which is slightly more difficult-- an app can be trivially programmed to do that, of course, but most apps aren't

    Apps like WMP. You retard.

    He did say "most apps aren't"....



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