They just don't bother...



  • From the Visual DataFlex 12.0 help file:

    • While the majority of web browsers support HTML 3.2, it will be a long time before you can count on most browsers supporting HTML 4.0.

    •           As of this writing, the latest web browsers from Netscape and Microsoft support a different sub-set of HTML 4.0 features.

     

     

    Note that 12.0 is a recent release...
     



  • I don't get it.  Just because nobody USES Netscape's browser anymore doesn't mean it doesn't exist.  No idea of the HTML4.0 for any browsers though.

    http://browser.netscape.com/ns8/ 



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    I don't get it.  Just because nobody USES Netscape's browser anymore doesn't mean it doesn't exist.  No idea of the HTML4.0 for any browsers though.

    http://browser.netscape.com/ns8/ 

    I think the point is that HTML 4.0 standard has been fairly well-adopted in the almost 8 years since it was released.



  • I've been a Netscape fan since version 1.  I only switched to Firefox recently because I was getting tired of the browser crashing on certain sites ("optimized" for IE, no doubt).  I actually think Netscape 8 has a better set of default preferences (things you need add-ons in order to customize in Firefox).  But hey, if most people like Firefox better, I'm fine with that becoming the standard "other" browser. 



  • @cconroy said:

    I've been a Netscape fan since version 1.  I only switched to Firefox recently because I was getting tired of the browser crashing on certain sites ("optimized" for IE, no doubt).  I actually think Netscape 8 has a better set of default preferences (things you need add-ons in order to customize in Firefox).  But hey, if most people like Firefox better, I'm fine with that becoming the standard "other" browser. 

    Netscape lost me with the dreadful Netscape 6.  There was a time before Firefox (then Phoenix) was viable when I actually used IE by choice.



  • @bstorer said:

    Netscape lost me with the dreadful Netscape 6.


    Are you implying that you liked NS 4?



  • @Cap'n Steve said:

    @bstorer said:
    Netscape lost me with the dreadful Netscape 6.


    Are you implying that you liked NS 4?

    Everyone is young and dumb once. (Besides, between IE4 and NS4 it really is the special olympics.)

    Related to the WTF: http://www.robinlionheart.com/stds/html4/results (Can't find the one I normally prefer.) Maybe you should send this page to the Flexgrid documenters. 



  • I hate to tell you this, but Firefox uses the same rendering engine as modern Netscape versions. In fact, Firefox is a fork from the fork from Netscape.



  • @henke37 said:

    I hate to tell you this, but Firefox uses the same rendering engine as modern Netscape versions. In fact, Firefox is a fork from the fork from Netscape.

    No, it really isn't.

    The history of the Gecko rendering engine is sordid and mired in corporate insanity, but here's a rough summary as best I remember it:

    It begins with Mosaic Netscape, which was eventually released as Navigator 1.0. This was used through to Navigator 3.0. The next product in the series was Communicator 4.0, which was based on the "Gold edition" of Navigator 3.0, and included the mail/news client and html composer. Much of the UI was rewritten in this version, making it slower and clumsier, but the rendering engine was retained.

    At around this time, work began on the Raptor rendering engine, since the old Navigator one really sucked and was generally inferior to IE. While this was being developed, Communicator 5.0 was released with an independently improved version of the Navigator engine. Work on this engine continued. Meanwhile...

    Netscape Corp. released the source to Communicator and founded the Mozilla project. At around the same time, Raptor was also released as source, but was not used in Communicator or Mozilla at this time. Shortly after this, Raptor was renamed to NGLayout for trademark reasons.

    Netscape announced that they were abandoning the development done for Communicator 5.0, and would use NGLayout in 6.0.

    Mozilla Org. discarded the Navigator engine, and migrated the Mozilla project (still in heavy pre-1.0 development) to NGLayout.

    Netscape rebranded NGLayout as Gecko. Mozilla Org. did not, because it was a trademark of Netscape Corp.

    Netscape was bought out by AOL. 

    AOL-Netscape released Communicator 6.0 with Gecko before either of them was really ready, in a rush of post-merger idiocy. Later, they released Communicator 7.0 as a continuation of that effort.

    Later, AOL made a deal with Microsoft, shut down what remained of Netscape, replaced all their uses of Communicator/Gecko with IE, and laid off what was left of the Gecko developers. At the same time, Mozilla Org. became Mozilla Foundation and picked up the development where AOL dropped it. Since Netscape was no longer in the picture, Mozilla NGLayout picked up the Gecko name as well, but kept their own branch of the code.

    In parallel with that last part, development on Firefox started as a way to get out from under the inconvenient limitations of AOL-Netscape's business objectives, and to rewrite the UI code that had been sucking ever since it was first created in Communicator 4.0.

    The layout engine finally released as Gecko with Firefox originally began being written by Netscape Corp, but at no point in its history has it ever been used in any release of a Netscape product. The thing called Gecko which was used in a few versions of Netscape, AOL, and Compuserve is a different branch of the code - there was probably some cross-pollination of bug fixes between the two branches, but by the time Communicator 6.0 came around, most of the serious development work was happening at Mozilla Org.

    Modern versions of Netscape Browser 8.0 and Netscape Navigator 9.0 have got absolutely nothing to do with Netscape Corp (which was completely eviscerated by AOL) - they just kept the trademark and are reusing the name. All development has been outsourced and is now done by a company called Mercurial Communications. Both of them are rebranded and lightly modified versions of Firefox.


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