Sheet Music 0.1



  • I'm playing around with the music notation program Sibelius. There are viewing options which include the ability to change the paper and desk textures. Using built-in textures, I created... (drum roll) ... Sheet Music 0.1:

    (Response in advance to WTF nitpickers: Measure 10 has 3 beats in it, you just can't see the eighth note bar)



  • The coffee stain is a nice touch.

     

    What key is that, F# ?  I don't think I can count that many sharps...  What instrument is that for?

     



  • Wow, I thought 4 sharps was a lot.  This is in the key of ...?



  • My guess is.... C XD



  • Looks like F# for the keytar.

    This is just Web 0.1 running in an emulator. Please print out this screen capture and take a photo of it on a real wooden table.



  •  



  • @Jojosh_the_Pi said:

    Wow, I thought 4 sharps was a lot.  This is in the key of ...?

     

    F-pound, of course! 



  • Six sharps annoys the heck out of me.  Six flats at least seems a little easier to deal with (at least the way my brain works) but anything over 5 sharps and I just burn the sheet music.

     And yeah, as other people have said, it's the key of F-pound :s



  • Good grief.

    Somebody please hack Lilypond to do this. 🙂



  • I couldn't handle more than 2 or 3 sharps in the key, but then again I played the tenor saxophone (B-flat instrument) so I almost always had flats. 



  • @tster said:

    I almost always had flats. 

    Perhaps you should get a better brand of tire for your car.



  • @shadowman said:

    The coffee stain is a nice touch.

     

    What key is that, F# ?  I don't think I can count that many sharps...  What instrument is that for?

     

    As others have said, F# major is the key. Add one more sharp and it's C# major. And THAT's the maximum amount of sharps you can have in a signature.

    This was a melody I had to make for Music Theory II class. I wrote it at the piano, but it's going to end up being the soprano "singer" in a four-part harmony.
     



  • But how can you play it with all those commented-out notes?



  • @boolean said:

    @shadowman said:

    The coffee stain is a nice touch.

     

    What key is that, F# ?  I don't think I can count that many sharps...  What instrument is that for?

     

    As others have said, F# major is the key. Add one more sharp and it's C# major. And THAT's the maximum amount of sharps you can have in a signature.

    This was a melody I had to make for Music Theory II class. I wrote it at the piano, but it's going to end up being the soprano "singer" in a four-part harmony.
     

    Well, yes, C# is the most sharps you can have in a key that anyone would have a possible reason to choose in these days of equal temperament. But there are keys that have double sharps- like you play F as G. I think B# is one: How's that do drive a professor crazy? 



  • @Cap'n Steve said:

    But how can you play it with all those commented-out notes?

    Thread over. Steve wins.



  • @robbak said:

    Well, yes, C# is the most sharps you can have in a key that anyone would have a possible reason to choose in these days of equal temperament. But there are keys that have double sharps- like you play F as G. I think B# is one: How's that do drive a professor crazy? 

    No key signature has double sharps, they only occur as accidentals.  To get double sharps you need a minor key where the 6th or 7th is already sharpened e.g G# minor has five sharps and will often have an accidental f double sharp when the 7th is sharpened.

    I have played the trombone in seven flats and used to refer to it as a 'full house'.

     BTW not all instruments play in equal temperament, even these days.  It is worth avoiding the compromises it entails if you have the opportunity.  More to the point under equal temperament 7 sharps and 5 flats are equivalent, so the fact that composers write in both alternatives implies that even temperament is or wasn't expected.

     



  • Still C# doesn't sound like music to me...

     

    I'm going to log out again... I want a captcha



  • @MET said:

    I have played the trombone in seven flats

    Why did you have to play the trombone in seven different flat-buildings? Did you get kicked out of them all the time? 🙂



  • @madjo said:

    @MET said:

    I have played the trombone in seven flats

    Why did you have to play the trombone in seven different flat-buildings? Did you get kicked out of them all the time? 🙂

    LOL.  It is a bit noisy, I should play in the street instead so the whole neighbourhood can benefit 🙂 



  • The coffee stain reminds me of the way Prof. Peter Schickele establishes the dates of P.D.Q. Bach's compositions.  (As described in his book on P.D.Q. Bach.)

    P.D.Q. Bach liked to do his composing in taverns, always with a big stein of Nibelungen(tm) beer, his favorite brand.  Usually he'd put his stein down on the page, so just about every manuscript of his has one or more beer rings.  (In German this is technically called a "Ring des Nibelungen.")

    Over the years the tavern owner saved money and cheated the customers by replacing the beer steins with slightly smaller steins.  You can measure the size of the ring, match it to the size of the stein and determine the exact year of composition.

    This way of dating manuscripts by stein size is known as the Stein Way.

     



  • @newfweiler said:

    The coffee stain reminds me of the way Prof. Peter Schickele establishes the dates of P.D.Q. Bach's compositions.  (As described in his book on P.D.Q. Bach.)

    P.D.Q. Bach liked to do his composing in taverns, always with a big stein of Nibelungen(tm) beer, his favorite brand.  Usually he'd put his stein down on the page, so just about every manuscript of his has one or more beer rings.  (In German this is technically called a "Ring des Nibelungen.")

    Over the years the tavern owner saved money and cheated the customers by replacing the beer steins with slightly smaller steins.  You can measure the size of the ring, match it to the size of the stein and determine the exact year of composition.

    This way of dating manuscripts by stein size is known as the Stein Way.

    Hehe, I bet Wagner would not be amused about that terminology ;p



  • @TDC said:

    @newfweiler said:

    The coffee stain reminds me of the way Prof. Peter Schickele establishes the dates of P.D.Q. Bach's compositions.  (As described in his book on P.D.Q. Bach.)

    P.D.Q. Bach liked to do his composing in taverns, always with a big stein of Nibelungen(tm) beer, his favorite brand.  Usually he'd put his stein down on the page, so just about every manuscript of his has one or more beer rings.  (In German this is technically called a "Ring des Nibelungen.")

    Over the years the tavern owner saved money and cheated the customers by replacing the beer steins with slightly smaller steins.  You can measure the size of the ring, match it to the size of the stein and determine the exact year of composition.

    This way of dating manuscripts by stein size is known as the Stein Way.

    Hehe, I bet Wagner would not be amused about that terminology ;p


    On the contrary, I [i]am[/i] rather amused by it.

Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.