Building a new gaming pc



  • My old PC died some time ago, and I've been relying on my laptop since then, which has severely limited the games I can play (not just because it has weaker hardware, it has also developed a heat issue and it shuts down after running games for a while).

    Anyway, I want to buy a new PC, and I haven't been looking into the hardware market for some time. Any recommendations for what to pick up? Is the new AMD chip any good or should I stick with Intel? AMD or nVidia for the GPU? That kind of stuff.

    Looking to get a new monitor too. Should I get a single big 4K thing, or multiple smaller monitors? I feel up to three smaller 24" monitors would be better for multitasking, keeping code, documentation, mails and such in different screens over keeping it all tiled in one huge screen, but I've never had a huge, ultra high-def monitor before.

    Also, does anybody have experience with water cooling? Worth it to try it out? I'll be assembling it all, not having it made to order or anything like that.


  • sockdevs

    @Kian said in Building a new gaming pc:

    Anyway, I want to buy a new PC, and I haven't been looking into the hardware market for some time. Any recommendations for what to pick up? Is the new AMD chip any good or should I stick with Intel? AMD or nVidia for the GPU? That kind of stuff.

    unless you have special needs i recommend looking up what your budget is on logical increments and buying what it recommends for your price range.

    Looking to get a new monitor too. Should I get a single big 4K thing, or multiple smaller monitors? I feel up to three smaller 24" monitors would be better for multitasking, keeping code, documentation, mails and such in different screens over keeping it all tiled in one huge screen, but I've never had a huge, ultra high-def monitor before.

    I prefer 2 1440p monitors myself. i have them in 16:9 and 21:9 aspect ratios and loving it

    Also, does anybody have experience with water cooling? Worth it to try it out? I'll be assembling it all, not having it made to order or anything like that.

    it'll add a lot to your price tag, but it gives you much better thermal dissipation than air so it lets you run quieter or push the overclocking envelope harder. I don't recommend it for any but the most enthusiast of enthusiast builds or for someone who wants the quietest possible PC. but if you want it, can afford it, and are willing to put up with the hassle of building it yourself, then go for it dood, go for it.



  • @accalia said in Building a new gaming pc:

    unless you have special needs

    E_TRIGGERED_ABLEISM

    Seriously though I hadn't heard of Logical Increments before, and it looks pretty useful. I'd also recommend PC Part Picker (adjust as necessary for your desired location) to find the parts you need.


  • sockdevs

    @hungrier said in Building a new gaming pc:

    E_TRIGGERED_ABLEISM

    special computing needs.

    ya damned :snowflake: :pendant:



  • AMD vs. Intel largely comes down to what you prefer to run. Anymore CPUs are rarely the bottleneck on games, so a mid-tier of either will be perfectly fine. (it is worth nothing that some games run better on one than on the other, so if you have a certain game in mind it doesn't hurt to check for that)

    AMD vs. Nvidia again comes down to personal preference really. I would suggest (depending on the type of games you play) a top mid-tier card. These will compete with most of the top end cards (on anything but the most demanding of setups) at a fraction of the cost.

    For monitors, what is your desk like? Getting a huge monitor is really hard to play games on if you can't get far enough away from. My desk is only 3 feet deep and the 27" (16:9) monitors I have currently are about the max I can comfortably see everything on. For general ease of use, I think two+ monitors is hands down superior to one giant monitor. (as an aside, if you play really old games, 800x600 looks atrocious on big screens).

    There are prebuilt water cooling kits priced in the range of highend air cooling setups. They are easy to install and as they are prebuilt and fully sealed never need any maintenance. I run one on my CPU because they are quite, which was reason enough to justify the extra cost over air.


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @Kian said in Building a new gaming pc:

    Also, does anybody have experience with water cooling? Worth it to try it out? I'll be assembling it all, not having it made to order or anything like that.

    I am not a gamer, but I water cooled my PC just for the quiet factor. Before water cooling, if I started loading down all 8 cores I could really hear the fans spin up and my PC is in a closet like cabinet at the end of my desk. Now it is dead quiet and staying several degrees cooler at all times. I went with a Corsair AIO setup for ~$100. Well worth the money to me.



  • @accalia said in Building a new gaming pc:

    unless you have special needs i recommend looking up what your budget is on logical increments and buying what it recommends for your price range.

    That logical increments site is neat, exactly what I needed. Also fun to see what a monstrous pc looks like.



  • @Kian Ryzen is pretty good. However apparently Intel is still better for gaming just about.

    AMD FX580 is an excellent GPU, That or a Nvidia 1060 ... go over 4gb if you can afford it. I can run most new games at 4k resolutions at about 50-70FPS on high or ultra. Drivers though are still a bit shit.

    I am still running a 2014 GPU. As for ram. I would recommend at least 16gb. This is Quake Champions (which is buggy as hell, but tbh it is a beta), running on my machine. I have 32gb of ram.

    0_1495054747008_a6b6630d-ee0e-461f-99ca-0bd50291b468-image.png



  • @Polygeekery IMHO you don't need it. I can barely hear my PC when running games.


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @lucas1 said in Building a new gaming pc:

    @Polygeekery IMHO you don't need it. I can barely hear my PC when running games.

    You are playing games that make noise. I am loading down 8 cores in a quiet room. I need it.


  • sockdevs

    @Polygeekery said in Building a new gaming pc:

    @lucas1 said in Building a new gaming pc:

    @Polygeekery IMHO you don't need it. I can barely hear my PC when running games.

    You are playing games that make noise. I am loading down 8 cores in a quiet room. I need it.

    now now..... do we have to have the wants versus needs talk again?

    :-P

    though for serious, an aio is a good move as a bridge between a custom water loop. most of the performance, about 70% less hassle.

    important thing to know about the AIOs though is most aren't designed to be refilled and will lose their water slowly over time (evaporation bitches. also i'm talking on the order of years and years of time) so it's a good idea to arrange the AIO so that it's horizontal and above the CPU or that the return from the rad is the low point on the rad. that way when you lose enough that vapor bubbles become a thing you don't suck them into your pump and cause cavatation damage. You don't want cavatation damage.

    that's probably being more paranoid than necessary as you're more likely to decomission the system before it's an issue but..... it doesn't hurt to be extra safe.



  • CPU: either Ryzen 1600x or i7 7700K, depending on your budget.

    GPU: GeForce.

    Water cooling: iff you OC. Otherwise not worth it.



  • @Polygeekery It hard to hear anything other than boy racers revving the bollox out of their cars.



  • @lucas1 said in Building a new gaming pc:

    Nvidia 1060 ... go over 4gb

    More or less this. Go for a 6GB card if you can. GTX 1060 or 1070 both are decent ATM. (I'm a bit biased towards NV, due to CUDA and the fact that their Linux-drivers are more-or-less on par with Win, but YMMV.)

    Personally, I'd rather skimp a bit on the CPU (so, i5 instead of i7) and get a better GPU instead.



  • @cvi since last month, desktop i5 is a waste of money.



  • @Gąska Haven't checked that recently. Ryzen better/cheaper at that price/performance point? (I'm guessing that's what you're referring to.)



  • @cvi 1600X has same price as i5-7600K and is marginally worse in games, but has 1.5x cores and 3x threads.



  • My recommendation for no heavier workloads than pure gaming (no streaming/recording, just playing) would be Kaby Lake i5 or Ryzen 5, 16GB RAM and at least GeForce GTX 1060 or Radeon RX 570 for 1080p, increase as necessary for higher resolutions. Also, SSDs for installing the OS, programs and games to.

    i7 and Ryzen 7 would be if you do the kind of heavy workloads that likes many cores and threads. Benefit of AMD is that upgrading to Ryzen 7 in the future is easy due to same socket. Intel has a completely different platform for their 6+-core i7s, 1151 is 4 cores max for now. Unsure what Coffee Lake will bring, though.

    Addendum: You also need to consider the chipset for the motherboard based off your needs. The higher-end chipsets have more features and connectivity options, but also costs more. For a normal non-overclocked PC without any special needs a mid-range one (Intel H270, AMD B350) works well enough. For overclocking and heavy stuff you may want to look at the high-end ones, though. (Intel Z270, AMD X370) And overclocking on Intel needs a K-series CPU too ofc.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @accalia said in Building a new gaming pc:

    i recommend looking up what your budget is on logical increments and buying what it recommends for your price range.

    I've used them as a guide the past few times I've built a gaming PC, and I've been pretty happy with the results. The lower down the scale you purchase at, the sooner you have to repurchase. (Obviously.) I've bought at the break point where going above it is silly money, and that lasted 5–6 years last time (except with a hardware refresh for the graphics card).

    Just remember to get a cooler for your CPU or you probably won't make it through installing the OS without a hardware shutdown. :blush:



  • @cvi The AMD RX series while their top end is top end 1060 you get some more VRAM and I think I posted some screenshots on another thread I can most modern titles at 4k.


  • area_deu

    @Kian The new AMD Ryzen chips are actually pretty great in their price range,

    -- warning overlong ryzen stuff, whathaveIdonewtf --

    the thing limiting them is that there is a quite difference in how good the firmware is from motherboard to motherboard, and that they are insanely picky with RAM. Not picky in the sense of "it won't work" but in the sense of "this chip scales insanely hard with memory speed". You will find a lot of early reviews out there that still float around the top of google that never realized this and thus thought the gaming performance of them sucks. It does, but only if you have standard speed ram. Most Intel chips and all the old amd chips scale so badly with ram speed in comparison that it was basically never worth it to no just take some cheap ram and invest the money elsewhere.

    If you Get 3200 or 3600 mhz ram instead of the standard 2133 and make sure it's based on the samsung b-die, you get very competitive speed. The "problem" then is that a lot of manufacturers don't tell you if their ram is based on those and most of them scale their pricing hard with mhz. But not all of them: the G.Skill Ripjaw Vs only marginally increase in price with ram speed and 100% of them contain the precious samsung b-dies, so just take those when going for a ryzen, they are universally pointed out as good and compatible. You can of course get faster memory than 3200, but its going to cost and it might not work out of the box.

    Also Ryzen chips seem to have a peculiar memory hole where the faster your ram gets, the better the gaming performance gets, but if you try to train memory between 3250-3550 it just crashes. Could be a motherboard issue that can still be ironed out from what I hear, but ATM it's just not worth it to get 3400 ram, just go 3600 then.

    There are also other peculiar problems that make optimizing and overclocking a ryzen system different from "how it's allways been done". To make it short, if you are a normal person you just set the voltage to 1.35V, slap a big ass cooler on it and see if you reach 3.8, 3.9 or 4.0GHz. This goes for all of them, be it 1700X or 1800X, those two are only better out of the box, but once you overclock they both only get 0.1GHz farther than a 1700 and aside form that they are exactly the same chip, so getting them is throwing money out the window. Because of the guaranteed 65W TDP of the 1700, you might actually come out cooler and with less wattage than with the pricyer models, depending on your chip. Most of the top overclocks are actually with 1700s and the current champion is too I think.

    But unlike with an intel chip, tweaking all those clocks and memory timings actually gets you tangiable improvements, but are much harder to do for someone that just can't get into that stuff; With intel you just tick up memory multipliers and voltage until the system won't boot anymore.

    But all of that is done in one day and then you will never touch it again until you get a new one, so if you are willing to pull through with getting your head deeper into it, or you also want to do stuff like rendering that really thrive on even an unoptimized ryzen better than on an equivalent intel chip,

    -- end of wall of text, I am sorry --

    then this is the chip for you. Unless your budget is so enormous that you have several hundred bucks more to spare, then heck yes go for the big intel guns, they are awesome. Or if your budget is smaller, then also go for intel. Basically just google for the best intel chip for your buck unless your price range contains the ryzen 1700 or you have a lot of money to burn. Just remeber that if you have the choice between an i7 and an i5, for pure gaming paying the extra for the i7 is throwing money out the window. Not going to deeply into it the i7 virtual threads are basically never worth it for gaming, in 99% or games disabling them in the bios gains you performance.
    Forget all of this, I forgot that the ryzen 5 series is a thing. Things are more complicated now, but I think now its AMD all the way unless you aim very high.

    Water cooling is just not worth it for normal chips IMO. You can get cheaper air cooling that is so silent you can barely hear it. I have never built a system for myself or anybody else where I thought "Ah yes, this is going to require so much cooling that water cooler radiators are going to be quieter than the air cooling" and I overclock all systems I build to the maximum limit you can safely push. Heck, my Ryzen System is at the foot of my bed -because I have a 1 room apartment- and I can barely hear it when it renders stuff over night.

    Graphics card is also a question of budget again, because IntelNvidia has the best cards and AMD the best bang-for-buck cards, and unlike in the past years they have bang-for-buck cards at several price ranges now, just not a the top of the top. My advice: Just pick your budget and compare the most expensive cards from both teams that that gets you. If even that is to complicated, then with an amd radeon rx 570 or 580 (in the high VRAM version) or an Nvidia GeForce Gtx 1060 you can't do anything wrong and it will be enaugh for 99% or all gaming needs you could have, you can play anything, almost anything current runs on highest settings with beyond 60fps and thats going to stay that way for at least 2 years, or 5 if you are willing to drop from "ultra" to "high" in the future. Unless you do ridiculus things like rendering videos for your 4K only let's play channel or live stream 1440p60fps streams, then you won't get around intel.nvidia



  • @dkf said in Building a new gaming pc:

    The lower down the scale you purchase at, the sooner you have to repurchase. (Obviously.) I've bought at the break point where going above it is silly money, and that lasted 5–6 years last time (except with a hardware refresh for the graphics card).

    In 2004, I've got AMD Athlon XP (1.9GHz Barton) and GF 4MX - decent CPU and shitty GPU, although I was too young to realize that - all my games worked. In 2007, in order to play CS:S, I replaced GPU with 7300GT (about $70 spent), which lasted until about 2011. Then I moved to my sister's laptop, which had some cheap i3 and GF 520M (it cost around $500 at the time, with low dollar value and all that). Then in 2014 I've got $800 desktop PC with i5-4440 and GF GTX760, both pretty mid-range stuff. If I didn't move to the other side of the world, I would probably use it until at least 2020.


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    @Quwertzuiopp
    It's super disappointing to me that AMD's product detail page includes so much less information about their processors than Intel's Ark page.

    Best I've been able to find is references on the Wikipedia page that the memory support is DDR4-2666, so if that's the true QT speed of the CPU, then it makes sense that using -2133 would cause a performance reduction, but I would also expect that going above -2666 would have rapidly diminishing returns (especially if you aren't fiddling around with the base clock speed of the processor).

    That said, my experience is solely on the Intel side of the house these days, where they specify their QT interconnect speed and provide support documentation that indicates having RAM over the QT speed isn't going to do diddly for you.


  • area_deu

    @izzion From what I hear and have observed myself, the returns do diminish after a certain point, but it really is -3200. Up to that point its still really worth it if you pick one of the brands that don't charge you 50€ per ram speed notch, which is why I recommend those G.Skills. Even -3600 seems to not be entirely thrown out money. The problem a lot of reviewers have with the chip is the gaming performance, because for stuff like rendering and emberrassingly parallel stuff they are really superb, but the gaming performance really does increase to a way more satisfactory level with faster ram.

    This is only hearsay, but one hardware reviewer suggested that because of the architecture of ryzen, some stuff that would not normally be heavily impacted by the ram clock actually synchronises to it, so even if you do not access ram you loose performance by having a lower ram speed. I have also read from quite a few people that they saw good results by just cranking up some of those clocks by 40% and lowering the multipliers, which would be insane and nonsensical on most intel chips I have worked with. Even the most hardcore overclockers only go +1.5% there.
    I have yet to try that out, but maybe I will when I get the time for it next week.



  • Hmm, tempted to go for a Ryzen system. Parts I'm thinking of getting (priced according to logical increments):

    • CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 1600X, $250
    • RAM: 16 GB DDR4, $108
    • GPU: GTX 1080, $500
    • Mobo: Asus X370-Pro, $160
    • HDD: 2 TB, $57
    • SSD: 240 GB, $80
    • PS: EVGAG3 650W, $90

    Might be some variance depending on what I have access to here (Amazon doesn't deliver to Argentina, but the situation has improved as of late), and I'll have to pay extra for the parts, but the budget looks to be about $1250. Could shave it down a bit with a GTX 1070 instead of the 1080, but I don't see anything else worth skimping on.


  • area_deu

    @Kian Maybe a nice cooler for the cpu? The stock ones usually suck, are loud and you can do quite a bit of the easy overclocking even with a half-decent cooler.

    Also, maybe I'm biased because I usually play games that are CPU-bound, but I think a GTX 1080 is overkill with that CPU. If your fps cap because of your cpu a monster graphics card is not going to help you much, unless you want to go for 4k then fair enaugh.



  • Do not buy a radeon card. I am returning mine. Thing overheated last week. Prey doesn't run correctly.


  • area_deu

    @lucas1 Which manufacturer, if I may ask? I'd like to avoid that if someone asks me to build a system for them again. Never had a problem with Saphire's Radeons or other graphics cards by them, be it nvidia or amd, they are usually overzealous with their cooling.



  • @Quwertzuiopp It is Sapphire. Shit drivers killed it



  • @Quwertzuiopp I plan to go with water cooling for the cpu, just didn't bother to write it down, since it won't matter as much to the "identity" of the system.

    Prices are also "best case". The CPU goes for $360 locally, the motherboard for $243. I can get the GPU for list price if I import it, but that carries its own added costs.


  • area_deu

    @lucas1 Not something I like to hear, but then again no system with a saphire radeon I am aware of has had any problems, but I'm going to have to look into this.



  • @Quwertzuiopp said in Building a new gaming pc:

    @lucas1 Which manufacturer, if I may ask? I'd like to avoid that if someone asks me to build a system for them again. Never had a problem with Saphire's Radeons or other graphics cards by them, be it nvidia or amd, they are usually overzealous with their cooling.

    Saphire does well for me, but I will not but any model with factory OC (had to reflash to stock bios to underclock one Saphire OC model to turn it stable)

    Will never buy anything MSI, experienced bad durability with mobos and video cards.

    XFX I consider no frills and durable, but usually it is hard to know the exacts specs on the concrete SKU, like if it has DDR5 or DDR3


  • area_deu

    @lucas1 Actually, now that I am looking into it, did this happen yesterday? Because Windows apparently hard pushes a silent driver "upgrade" downgrading a lot of people to an old driver since yesterday, with no error promt or any kind of logging, even while the graphics card is in full operation. This has caused nasty crashes for a lot of people and a lot of people thought their Graphics card broke, but it was "just" Windows shenanigans. Apparently you have to reinstall a proper driver while offline, or windows will instant rollback you again without error or logs, crashing you again. For a lot of people, it just made their screen go completely black. Some people with auto update scripts/programs apparently got into crash loops because windows and the script are constantly overwriting the driver.



  • Well I reinstalled prey and it works perfectly. Sniper Elite 4 works perfectly now. Going to try Crysis 3 tonight and probably run the card with 3d Mark.

    I reinstalled the WHQL driver last night and things seem okay. ~But now I have this nagging feeling something isn't right and I use this machine for work as my work machine (Ubuntu / Win 7) doesn't have the grunt anymore.



  • Welp, I may have gotten a bit carried away once I had my card out and got to buying things. Still haven't gotten the video card, but what I have so far (links are for illustration purposes only, not the actual location or price I bought them at):

    MOBO Asus Rog Crosshair VI Hero
    CPU AMD Ryzen 5 1600X
    RAM gskill tridentz ddr4 3200 2x8 GB
    SSD Pny 240 GB
    PS EVGA G3 650W
    Cooler Corsair Hydro H60

    Still missing a hard drive (will probably pick one up when I got pick up the parts from the different sellers), and of course the GPU which I'll leave for the next billing period (next week). Will be fun to see what the onboard graphics allow for with this setup until then. Should be able to build it some time next week.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Kian What case are you putting them in? I've had problems with fitting lots of cooling into cases in the past, where minor internal features turned out to be major PITAs that required “interesting” DIY skills to bodge around.



  • @dkf I have the case for the old pc that died, it was fairly roomy, so it should fit well in there. I had a hefty air cooler in that one without issue. I don't recall the name of the model, was a cooler master one. It is black :P I watched a tutorial for installing the watercooler and it didn't seem to be difficult. Doesn't really take much space since the radiator is intended to be placed in the ventilation space next to the cpu.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Kian Yeah. I've got a system that has a case that should be plenty large enough, and it would be except for some switches that jut down into the space required for a water cooler's radiator to be fixed. A standard fan would have been fine, but the cooler was just that little bit larger.

    A water cooled GPU is worth it. ;)



  • @Kian You are not pure you are not part of the master race

    In all seriousness I hope the new rig build goes well. I will post 3dMark and similar of my RX580, and I wanna see that 1080 smashing it! :D



  • Was looking at cases, and the Corsair Carbide 600C caught my attention. Looks good for if I want to move on to more advanced watercooling options later (which I do). Big enough to fit a person there. Anyone have experience with inverted ATX cases?

    Also, still deciding on the monitors. I'm a fan of the 16:10 ratio over 16:9, so I have a couple 1920x1200 monitors to use, but with the new GPU I was thinking of getting higher resolution screens. Going one step up to 2560x1600 doesn't seem possible, however, since there just aren't any good ones at that resolution, and what is there is two to three times as expensive as a 2560x1440 screen. I may have to join the unwashed masses and resign myself to 16:9 screens at last. Dell's UltraSharp U2515H look to be decent.



  • @Kian I have the fractal design R4 case

    It is big. But I can fit the largest cards in easily.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @accalia said in Building a new gaming pc:

    unless you have special needs i recommend looking up what your budget is on logical increments and buying what it recommends for your price range.

    Wow.

    You can build some really trash-cheap AMD boxes. I thought my $300 throwaway Intel i3 systems were as low as practical.


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    @Weng said in Building a new gaming pc:

    @accalia said in Building a new gaming pc:

    unless you have special needs i recommend looking up what your budget is on logical increments and buying what it recommends for your price range.

    Wow.

    You can build some really trash-cheap AMD boxes. I thought my $300 throwaway Intel i3 systems were as low as practical.

    FTFY :trolleybus:


  • sockdevs

    @Weng said in Building a new gaming pc:

    @accalia said in Building a new gaming pc:

    unless you have special needs i recommend looking up what your budget is on logical increments and buying what it recommends for your price range.

    Wow.

    You can build some really trash-cheap AMD boxes. I thought my $300 throwaway Intel i3 systems were as low as practical.

    well, it really does depend on what your use case is.... cause the thing is..... a $100 PC will be struggling to keep up from day one (like painfully so), a 500$ will get a couple of years before it can't keep up anymore (more if it's not a gaming rig) and a 1000$ one will easily last you ten years or so before it just can't keep up anymore, and will still have years left in it as a net surfer machine.

    so it's all down to how much you can spend today, because the more you can (to a limit) the better spent the money is. ;-)


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @accalia said in Building a new gaming pc:

    @Weng said in Building a new gaming pc:

    @accalia said in Building a new gaming pc:

    unless you have special needs i recommend looking up what your budget is on logical increments and buying what it recommends for your price range.

    Wow.

    You can build some really trash-cheap AMD boxes. I thought my $300 throwaway Intel i3 systems were as low as practical.

    well, it really does depend on what your use case is.... cause the thing is..... a $100 PC will be struggling to keep up from day one (like painfully so), a 500$ will get a couple of years before it can't keep up anymore (more if it's not a gaming rig) and a 1000$ one will easily last you ten years or so before it just can't keep up anymore, and will still have years left in it as a net surfer machine.

    so it's all down to how much you can spend today, because the more you can (to a limit) the better spent the money is. ;-)

    I use my $300 i3 spec for things like "the computer in the garage", "the computer in the living room", "the computer in the kitchen (don't judge me)", been thinking about a high-humidity version for the bathrooms, and most important of all, shit for old family members.


  • sockdevs

    @Weng said in Building a new gaming pc:

    the computer in the kitchen (don't judge me)

    Makes perfect sense to me to have a computer in the kitchen: you can have recipes on it :slight_smile:



  • @Weng said in Building a new gaming pc:

    I use my $300 i3 spec for things like "the computer in the garage", "the computer in the living room", "the computer in the kitchen (don't judge me)"

    Meanwhile, I'm thinking of the best way to combine two (gaming) computers into one so I wont have too many computers around the house.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Atazhaia said in Building a new gaming pc:

    @Weng said in Building a new gaming pc:

    I use my $300 i3 spec for things like "the computer in the garage", "the computer in the living room", "the computer in the kitchen (don't judge me)"

    Meanwhile, I'm thinking of the best way to combine two (gaming) computers into one so I wont have too many computers around the house.

    The one in the garage DEFINITELY needs to be standalone. It's 100 yards away from anything that doesn't suck.



  • @Weng said in Building a new gaming pc:

    I use my $300 i3 spec for things like "the computer in the garage", "the computer in the living room", "the computer in the kitchen (don't judge me)"

    Why not get a single $300 laptop?


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    I'm trying to decide between

    • AMD Ryzen 7 1{7|8}00X
    • Intel i7-7700K
    • Intel i7-6950K

    My big problem being I can stress single core speed or parallelism depending on what I'm doing. Games, transcoding, media editing, lots of things running at the same time...I do it all, though not frequently right now.


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