Tech stack makeup



  • Boss sent me the old list of technologies we use and told me to update it.

    0_1492687888151_upload-aea90950-9567-4bbe-9136-85327f592707

    Thoughts:

    • Wow, that's a lot of buzzwords under the "What do we do?". Did we actually make any of those things, ever? I don't think so. But we can try if you pay us!

    • A lot of NET stuff is getting deprioritized. You kind of have to have .NET programmers in order to produce .NET programs.

    • node is definitely getting on the list, and PHP is making a comeback too.

    So here's the new list:

    • MEAN stack: node.js, express.js, mongo-db, angular 4
    • LAMP stack: Laravel, Symfony, Slim, MariaDB
    • Microsoft stack: .NET, C# 4/5/6/7, WPF/WCF, .NET Core
    • React.js, React Native, React VR
    • Wordpress, HTML + SASS/LESS, website design
    • EPI Server CMS

    Basically, just pay us, we'll do anything using anything.

    So what's the tech stack for your company (if you're offering programming services)? How would you pump it up to look more impressive than it really is?


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    @cartman82 said in Tech stack makeup:

    MEAN stack: node.js, express.js, mongo-db, angular 4

    Node users are Sadists/Masochists, confirmed



  • .NET 5.x? That's a framework for the next 10 years.



  • From the job postings, annotations in italic

    • .NET, C# duh
    • Principles of SOLID, Design Patterns, OO, DD, Refactoring really?
    • Webdevelopment: HTML5, CSS, Javascript & JQuery Because plain HTML is HTML5 too, isn't it?
    • Visual Studio, IIS, SQL Server (TSQL) & NoSQL Have I told you we are a Microsoft shop?
    • Considered a plus: NHibernate, Castle Windsor, NUnit, Log4Net, RavenDB, TypeScript, Knockout, Bootstrap, Node.js/NPM, ASP.NET MVC, Web API Who is that node guy and what is he working on? It's probably that one guy that turns up asking why we aren't using new fancy SharePoint option/feature that MS made available through fast track. Asshole.


  • @coldandtired said in Tech stack makeup:

    .NET 5.x? That's a framework for the next 10 years.

    That was kind of optimistic in retrospect :)

    Seriously, wasn't ".NET Core" called ".NET 5" at that time? Pretty good indicator that copy was out of date.



  • @Luhmann said in Tech stack makeup:

    Refactoring

    Uh-oh. Almost as bad sign as "requires driver's license".

    HTML5, CSS, Javascript & JQuery Because plain HTML is HTML5 too, isn't it?

    Saying "HTML5" makes it sound like the ad hasn't been updated in 5 years. Smells like stale piss in a retirement home too.

    Visual Studio, IIS, SQL Server (TSQL) & NoSQL Have I told you we are a Microsoft shop?

    "NoSQL" = we switched from ASP cache to redis.

    Considered a plus: NHibernate, Castle Windsor, NUnit, Log4Net, RavenDB, TypeScript, Knockout, Bootstrap, Node.js/NPM, ASP.NET MVC, Web API Who is that node guy and what is he working on? It's probably that one guy that turns up asking why we aren't using new fancy SharePoint option/feature that MS made available through fast track. Asshole.

    Staleness red flag: Knockout.

    You might as well admit you have a legacy app any newbie will be forced to maintain.



  • @cartman82 said in Tech stack makeup:

    Staleness red flag

    Hey ... but we removed the words Mainframe, Cobol, NeverHipFramework 4 and ObsoleteTech 2!



  • @cartman82 said in Tech stack makeup:

    we switched from ASP cache to redis.

    Mentioned below: RavenDB


  • area_pol

    @cartman82 said in Tech stack makeup:

    MEAN stack: node.js, express.js, mongo-db, angular 4

    What a nightmare.
    Does nodejs actually give a lot of code sharing between server and client to justify the choice?
    Why mongo?



  • @cartman82 said in Tech stack makeup:

    LAMP stack: Laravel, Symfony, Slim, MariaDB

    Laravel, Aymfony, MariaDB, Plim?



  • @Adynathos said in Tech stack makeup:

    Why mongo?

    It's the default and nobody bothers to think about it too much to change it. If they did they wouldn't be running that stack in the first place



  • In terms of staleness, I don't think you can get much worse than someone I know who is working on a new and "hip" desktop and mobile app using Adobe AIR with ActionScript.

    Yeah.

    Here's our tech stack:

    Server Architecture: Azure
    Client Side: TypeScript, Angular, Signalr
    Server Side: C#, Web API, Node.js
    Data: Elastic Search, Redis, and Azure SQL Server

    The only thing that's stale is we haven't migrated to Angular2+ yet. It'd be a big undertaking which we don't have the resources for right now. Considering 3 years ago we were all Silverlight, we've gone a long way, though.



  • @Adynathos said in Tech stack makeup:

    What a nightmare.
    Does nodejs actually give a lot of code sharing between server and client to justify the choice?

    Nope. Its benefits are:

    • Super easy API wrangling due to the way JSON <> object interop works
    • Nice language features (with ES7)
    • No compilation, but you have to restart the app to update it. So development speed wise, it's between PHP (fast) and compiled languages a la JAVA and .NET (slow)
    • Large ecosystem (not exactly "good", but quantity has quality of its own)
    • Linux-based
    • Fast enough

    Why mongo?

    Actually, I loathe mongo and don't do Angular.

    But the guy we recently hired loves him some mongo and angular. That Mettle optimizer guy who's starting soon does as well. So we'll have the capacity.


  • BINNED

    The original specification for my job:

    Essential

    1. VB.NET development
    2. Application Management
    3. Technical Project Management
    4. Analysis, soln design, testing

    Desirable

    1. Team lead
    2. Financial Services
    3. Solution Architect

    We're now moving away from VB to C#, and from Webforms to MVC. It's a full Microsoft stack with IIS, SQL Server etc.



  • My stacks are weird enough they could uniquely identify me in my country



  • @wharrgarbl

    Is it the DARN stack?

    • Delete
    • Alts
    • Ragequit
    • Necro


  • @Jaloopa That sounds... awful. Like a business version of a buzzword soup.


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    @wharrgarbl
    That's what she said? :giggity:


  • BINNED

    @cartman82 said in Tech stack makeup:

    Like a business version of a buzzword soup

    That's what you get from a business that's realised that outsourcing all development work is a bad idea and is in the process of inhousing everything. They didn't really have much of a clue, ahich has given me a fair bit of leeway to set things up how I want


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    @cartman82 said in Tech stack makeup:

    the guy we recently hired loves him some mongo and angular

    Sometimes I think people only stick with mongo and angular because it wouldn't spell MEAN otherwise. Soon we'll be seeing:

    MEAN: node, Hapi.js, React, PostGreSQL



  • @Yamikuronue said in Tech stack makeup:

    @cartman82 said in Tech stack makeup:

    the guy we recently hired loves him some mongo and angular

    Sometimes I think people only stick with mongo and angular because it wouldn't spell MEAN otherwise. Soon we'll be seeing:

    MEAN: node, Hapi.js, React, PostGreSQL

    You mean like:

    LAMP stack: Laravel, Symfony, Slim, MariaDB



  • At work we use:

    .NET 4.5.2 (C#, although I was tempted to write some VB.Net for shits and giggles), EPiServer, SQL Azure, Bootstrap, LESS, and jQuery.

    Although I try to write new stuff without using jQuery as 90% of what we use it for (selectors and event handlers) can easily be replaced with browser native functionality.



  • I keep wanting to read the title as "Tech stack mashup". So, same meaning then. :tropical_drink:



  • @cartman82 That's clearly a NEMA stack.


  • SockDev

    I don't remember what our official job spec says, but ours is:

    Server: Windows Web Server 2007, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012 R2
    Back-end: MySQL, PHP, PHPExcel, Slim on occasion
    Front-end: HTML5, CSS3, jQuery 1.11, jQuery UI 1.11(?), Bootstrap 3.3



  • This pulled from the city agency is similar enough to the position I was promoted to last March:

    Hands-on development experience with projects involving Microsoft.NET and SQL Server technologies for web, web service and desktop application development using C#.NET, ASP.NET, ADO.NET, HTML 5, AJAX, WPF, WCF, MVC, jQuery, JavaScript, CSS, Entity Framework, LINQ, IIS 7.5, Visual Studio 2012/2013/2015.
    Strong knowledge of jQuery or other JavaScript frameworks for creating rich interactive web applications.
    5+ years of relational database design, normalization, T-SQL, stored procedures, SQL Server 2012/2014/2016, DTS/SSIS packages, SQL Reporting Services (or Crystal Reports) and ad-hoc reporting.
    5+ years of exposure to application lifecycle management tools for configuration management, version control (build definitions, continuous integration, branching, shelving), defect tracking and testing (Microsoft Team Foundation Server 2015 is preferred).
    Strong knowledge of Object Oriented programming and design patterns.
    Identity Management using Windows Active Directory.

    It was an internal promotion so...:nudge: :nudge:


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election



  • My bread and butter is .NET and SQL SERVER:

    • Angular 1 / Backbone.js
    • OWIN / .NET 4.5 (.Net core isn't ready IMHO)
    • SQL SERVER / POSTGRES
    • IIS / NGINX

    However for newer projects it is:

    • Angular JS 2
    • Python 2.7
    • SQL SERVER / POSTGRES
    • IIS / NGINX

    Everything is hosted on Azure now except one client who wanted custom VPS which IMHO is a pain in the backside.

    CouchDB I am using for logging requests coming in and out of web apis. I have a custom middleware that works on before and after requests coming.

    I was going to use Angular 2 but the Angular Team seemed to have lost their mind recently.

    The only reason I've moved to python is that I can get up and running with all the boring shite work like Roles / Users.



  • @cartman82 In case you don't know: No one knows how to do Microservices right, especially with Service Fabric. Therefore, no one knows it better than you, since you don't incorrectly think you know it. And, being the new hotness, you should get lots of people who want you to do it.

    So, go ahead and include that and get some nice tasty contracts.



  • Can someone rename this topic to Tech stack crapup? Makes more sense...



  • @lucas1 said in Tech stack makeup:

    However for newer projects it is:

    Angular JS 2
    Python 2.7
    SQL SERVER / POSTGRES
    IIS / NGINX

    Everything is hosted on Azure now except one client who wanted custom VPS which IMHO is a pain in the backside.
    CouchDB I am using for logging requests coming in and out of web apis. I have a custom middleware that works on before and after requests coming.
    I was going to use Angular 2 but the Angular Team seemed to have lost their mind recently.
    The only reason I've moved to python is that I can get up and running with all the boring shite work like Roles / Users.

    Change Angular 2 to Angular 4. Not sure what's going on with versions in Angular land. But the guys I am working with are saying Angular 4 is MUCH improved over Ang 2, specifically regarding the boilerplate decorator crap you have to write.

    Also, why not Python 3? If you are not gonna use v3, you should remove version number from the tech list.



  • @Magus said in Tech stack makeup:

    @cartman82 In case you don't know: No one knows how to do Microservices right, especially with Service Fabric. Therefore, no one knows it better than you, since you don't incorrectly think you know it. And, being the new hotness, you should get lots of people who want you to do it.
    So, go ahead and include that and get some nice tasty contracts.

    Yup. Every time I look into it, it's always "we use beta version of framework A, and add library B and hacks C and D to cover its crippling flaws..."

    Most projects don't really need microservices or scaling or anything more than a simple server app + SQL database. If you're gonna pay the ramp up and infrastructure costs, make damn sure you'll actually need the scaling.


  • BINNED

    @lucas1 said in Tech stack makeup:

    Python 2.7

    Why not 3? Especially in new projects



  • @Jaloopa Mainly because I am used to using 2.7 and I don't have enough time. Clients don't really care what you build it in as long as it works and the tech isn't too weird (I am not using Clojure or something like Elixir).

    Also I've seen no compelling reason to move to 3 and it works for meTM there was still stuff missing last time I bothered to check.

    I've also become very my a proponent of the boring stack. I just want to get stuff done.

    <rant> Trying to find a front end stack where the developers haven't gone totally mental (I thought Angular 2 was going to be it, but nope we are going to break shit every other release even though it is supposed to be semver compatible). </rant>


  • @lucas1 said in Tech stack makeup:

    <rant> Trying to find a front end stack where the developers haven't gone totally mental (I thought Angular 2 was going to be it, but nope we are going to break shit every other release even though it is supposed to be semver compatible). </rant>

    Why not ember? :trollface:



  • @cartman82 Was looking at Glimmer

    and Aurealia

    As their devs seem to have sensible opinions about updates. Most of the time I just don't want to go into dependency hell.

    One of the things I don't like about VS online CI server is that they just upgrade node versions. So you gotta keep with the churn if you are doing a front end build. Which would be fine is semver compatibility meant semver compability. Angular 2 team didn't even checking it worked e.g. lib maintained by the same team went from version 1.0.X to 1.0.X+1, which is still supposed to be compatible with Angular 2 and 4. LOL NO. So we had to upgrade everything to angular 2 to 4 and do a find and replace everytime we used ng-template.



  • @lucas1 said in Tech stack makeup:

    Was looking at Glimmer

    That's like Ember lite.

    and Aurealia

    That's like angular heavy.



  • @cartman82 The problem with Ember was it's slow as fuck View engine. Most new frameworks use DOM diffs which are much faster. Also Jeff's fucktard dev team were redrawing everything everytime you scrolled. Repaints really slow the browser down.


  • And then the murders began.

    @lucas1 said in Tech stack makeup:

    <rant> Trying to find a front end stack where the developers haven't gone totally mental (I thought Angular 2 was going to be it, but nope we are going to break shit every other release even though it is supposed to be semver compatible). </rant>

    The problem is that you have a "frontend stack" to start with. Whatever happened to just using HTML with form posts to a web server like :octopus: intended?


  • SockDev

    @Unperverted-Vixen said in Tech stack makeup:

    Whatever happened to just using HTML with form posts to a web server like :octopus: intended?

    Web apps happened.



  • @Unperverted-Vixen

    Because people that pay me want interactive web applications, not basic web sites.


  • SockDev

    0_1492780437570_upload-631e5f06-933e-49af-9b0a-0647e40b2d58

    Seems about right :D


  • BINNED

    @RaceProUK the signature that keeps on giving



  • @lucas1 said in Tech stack makeup:

    @cartman82 The problem with Ember was it's slow as fuck View engine. Most new frameworks use DOM diffs which are much faster. Also Jeff's fucktard dev team were redrawing everything everytime you scrolled. Repaints really slow the browser down.

    Ember's current view engine is Glimmer.

    The real problem for me was that its convention over configuration thing never quite worked right. Instead of just seeing what's requiring what in your IDE, uou had to keep a bunch of naming trivia rules in your head. And it never got easier.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @cartman82 said in Tech stack makeup:

    So what's the tech stack for your company

    WTF-U uses a great many different technologies because we don't do consistency. :p

    But within this group, we use Python and GCC. And Perl. And Java. And who knows what else is squirrelled away. We try for making things look cool by talking about the custom stuff that we do with it, but that's relatively easily done; it's not the tech stack that is the neat bit, but rather the (very!) custom hardware that we drive with it.



  • @cartman82 said in Tech stack makeup:

    Ember's current view engine is Glimmer.

    But in the past it was something else.



  • C, PHP, SQL, and a custom business rules language which is turing-complete.



  • @PleegWat said in Tech stack makeup:

    and a custom business rules language which is turing-complete

    You too, eh?

    K / Q, Java, ReactJS, Python, any database you can name that isn't Postgres (right now; I hope to change that) and what @PleegWat said.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election



  • Am I the only one that wants to know what tech stacks makeup companies use?

    No:question:

    I will see myself out.


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