A Long Baseball Game



  • I think the White Sox and the Indians are stuck in a temporal causality loop:

    baseball



  • Not only that, but Blake and Uribe are playing for both teams.



  • Sorry... care to explain for the non-baseball challanged europeans?

    <edit>

    ...oh...yeah, being able to read might help too... my fault... still, what does "homered to deep right/left" mean? 



  • "homered" = hit a home run
    "deep right" = The area of right field furthest from home plate, and thereby closest to the wall.

    By definition, all home runs go to the deep part of the field, as they clear the wall.


     Hopefully you understand baseball enough to understand those explanations.  If not, I suppose we could try again with cricket analogies.



  • Great, like the game isn't long enough already... (At least it appears they've finally broken out of the loop, into the 4th inning.)



  • I especially like how Uribe managed to ground out and score on the same play



  • Ya know how little I pay attention to baseball when it took me a couple minutes to figure out what the hell "Chi" meant. 



  • @bstorer said:

    "homered" = hit a home run
    "deep right" = The area of right field furthest from home plate, and thereby closest to the wall.

    By definition, all home runs go to the deep part of the field, as they clear the wall.


     Hopefully you understand baseball enough to understand those explanations.  If not, I suppose we could try again with cricket analogies.

     

    With the cricket analogies:

     "Homered" is mechanically the
    same "hit a six", except that it scores anywhere from 1 to 4 depending
    on how many runners are on base.  Of course, one run in baseball is a
    great deal more valuable than six in cricket.

    "Deep right" is, for a right-handed batter, roughly "long off".  It's only possible to hit a home run to long off, long on, or a straight hit (in a 90-degree arc from home plate); a ball leaving the field of play in any other direction is a foul.

     



  • @stationary said:

    @bstorer said:

    "homered" = hit a home run
    "deep right" = The area of right field furthest from home plate, and thereby closest to the wall.

    By definition, all home runs go to the deep part of the field, as they clear the wall.


     Hopefully you understand baseball enough to understand those explanations.  If not, I suppose we could try again with cricket analogies.

     

    With the cricket analogies:

     "Homered" is mechanically the
    same "hit a six", except that it scores anywhere from 1 to 4 depending
    on how many runners are on base.  Of course, one run in baseball is a
    great deal more valuable than six in cricket.

    "Deep right" is, for a right-handed batter, roughly "long off".  It's only possible to hit a home run to long off, long on, or a straight hit (in a 90-degree arc from home plate); a ball leaving the field of play in any other direction is a foul.

     

    Indeed, and grounding out is roughly equivalent to being run out.

    A sacrifice fly has no real cricket equivalent, however.  It's basically a case of being out caught, but scoring one or more runs in the process by advancing runners on those bases cricket doesn't have.
     



  • Is there a link or photo missing from this thread?  I'm a baseball fan and understand all of that, but I haven't the slightest idea what this thread is referring to.

    Edit:  I tried opening this in IE and it became apparent that my company's web filter is blocking the image for some reason.  In Firefox, I just had the word "baseball" where the image was supposed to be -- no placeholder or anything.  I'm sure you can understand my confusion.  I guess I'll check it out when I get home.
     



  • @bstorer said:

    @stationary said:
    @bstorer said:

    "homered" = hit a home run
    "deep right" = The area of right field furthest from home plate, and thereby closest to the wall.

    By definition, all home runs go to the deep part of the field, as they clear the wall.

    Hopefully you understand baseball enough to understand those explanations.  If not, I suppose we could try again with cricket analogies.

    With the cricket analogies:

     "Homered" is mechanically the same "hit a six", except that it scores anywhere from 1 to 4 depending on how many runners are on base.  Of course, one run in baseball is a great deal more valuable than six in cricket.

    "Deep right" is, for a right-handed batter, roughly "long off".  It's only possible to hit a home run to long off, long on, or a straight hit (in a 90-degree arc from home plate); a ball leaving the field of play in any other direction is a foul.

    Indeed, and grounding out is roughly equivalent to being run out.

    A sacrifice fly has no real cricket equivalent, however.  It's basically a case of being out caught, but scoring one or more runs in the process by advancing runners on those bases cricket doesn't have.

    I envisioned "homered to deep right" meant heaving a robust Simpson's character on top of Pat Buchanan.

    --Rank



  • @shadowman said:

    Is there a link or photo missing from this thread?  I'm a baseball fan and understand all of that, but I haven't the slightest idea what this thread is referring to.

    Edit:  I tried opening this in IE and it became apparent that my company's web filter is blocking the image for some reason.  In Firefox, I just had the word "baseball" where the image was supposed to be -- no placeholder or anything.  I'm sure you can understand my confusion.  I guess I'll check it out when I get home.
     

    I think the point is that the events aren't in any sort of coherent order.  The events switch back and forth between innings and top/bottom of them.  You would expect to see all the top 1st's grouped together, followed by bottom 1sts grouped together, etc.  It also seems that at least one player is on both teams.  

     

    Edit: The more I look at it, the less the whole things makes sense.  J Urbide batted for one team and grounded out, yet managed to score.  The only way that would happen was if he batted twice, and you'd see a lot more scores if that happened.  Then later, they have Urbide batting for the other team. 


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