Verbing verbiage



  • It appears that Facebook has (correctly) guessed I am looking for a house, and given that blocking ads on mobile browsers is not as easy as it is on a desktop, I'm getting interesting ads like this:

    0_1490385014572_upload-8282505d-efa5-469d-aa28-91b061f60418

    Now, while I'm sure that the answer here involves financing closing costs, and as scandalous as that seems, I'm more concerned with the inquiries below:

    0_1490385820819_upload-ba51ed14-5ca0-45d0-8c12-70e0ebf85299

    Apparently, a few people (who want to finance their closing costs) have collectively decided that "to inbox" is now a transitive verb. Incredulous that such a nonsensical (and non-consensual) rape of the language could have occurred under my nose, I decided I'd check online to see if such a definition exists. There's no way these radical neologists are in the right! There's no way the language would change so quickly to accommodate such careless...

    0_1490385962797_upload-687dd467-1690-4345-b8cc-65e51daaf006

    Crap.



  • I have a feeling of deja-vu. Have we had this discussion about a different word in the last 6 months?



  • You must be new. Americans have been doing this shit for years.



  • @coldandtired If you think americans do terrible things to english, you don't want to see what non-english-speaking people who thinks english words are cool do.


  • area_can

    @Groaner cest la vie! Descriptivism ftw!!



  • Note that it is listed as "informal", which ostensibly means it should not be used in professional contexts.

    But, yes, English speakers have a tendency to verb words at their pleasure.





  • @djls45 said in Verbing verbiage:

    Note that it is listed as "informal", which ostensibly means it should not be used in professional contexts.

    Yet.


  • area_can

    @Gąska said in Verbing verbiage:

    Yet.


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