Phishing: Print webpage, place on table...



  • Out of sheer boredom, I visited a link in a phishing email.  For kicks, I filled in the "loan request" form, explaining that I had poor credit, and needed to refinance my $2 million, 14.75% loan on my $70,000 mobile home.

     

    Then I noticed the "security"  logos at the top of the page -- Trust*e, CAN-SPAM, etc.  What the hell do you have to do to an image to get it to degrade that badly?

    Stealing images from websites isn't *that* hard...



  • That's why you have to renew these certificates - they're printed with a special e-ink that fades over time.



  • @merreborn said:

    What the hell do you have to do to an image to get it to degrade that badly?

    Looks like it was printed... too small... with an ink jet printer, scanned, and probably jpegged enough times to make me feel ill.

    I can't explain why the web page author didn't simply save the images from their original source, but it might have something to do with a paper-based workflow and the actual web page author taking what he's given, on paper, without comment



  • @Brendan Kidwell said:

    Looks like it was printed... too small... with an ink jet printer

    Ooh ooh! Bonus points if you can recover the yellow dots code and prosecute the sucker!



  • Take a look at the source too... those hidden fields with non-ascii values doesn't look very healthly either...



  • What information are these guys after anyhow?  I guess all you need for identity theft is their name + address and amount left on their loan?  Or is this just step one for a scam job?  Might be fun to give them a real phone number and string them along for a while.



  • Maybe they're not actually phishing, but instead selling the mortgage leads.

    You can get up to $45/lead for a simple form like this from some big name companies.
     


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