BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:)



  • I dunnno...probably a victim of Poe's law, but I found this hilarious:

    There is a theme running through this that humanities students have no friends and never socialize but STEM students have tons of friends and go out and party a lot.



  • Go ahead and Google the answer to "Translate instructions like 'add register four to five' from a string of ones and zeroes, in this one architecture that doesn't really exist but my professor made it up. Oh and by the way that exam question had a typo in it so literally everyone got it wrong, but the professor isn't going to give anyone points because fuck you, that's why, you should have magically known the answer anyway." I'll wait. (true story, everyone was pissed that day...) In fact the insane lengths some professors go to inventing entire languages, systems, etc. in order to prevent their students from Googling answers or receiving help from upperclassmen can often make the material taught in that course entirely worthless in practical application.

    I love the implication that STEM students are all talentlessly coasting along with WolframAlpha too. Because people don't really know math, LOL! Projecting harder than a potato cannon.



  • Yeah, but what about people who have a BA in Mathematics? :trollface:



  • https://twitter.com/alicecachia .

    Nope, looks like the article is completely serious.



  • @boomzilla said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    There is a theme running through this that humanities students have no friends and never socialize but STEM students have tons of friends and go out and party a lot.

    In my experience, that's not actually untrue.

    Not because a BSc is easier, but because if you get the subject, you don't have to spend nearly as much time digging through the books. With things like history or literature, there's pretty much no way around rote memorization no matter how good you are - with computer science, mathematics or chemistry, a good student should be building a mental model that lets them deduce what they haven't memorized. You don't have to remember nearly as much if you can apply what you do know to infer the rest.

    The article, of course, is a totally pointless whine.

    For starters, we can’t copy each others’ answers like you do in your coursework, and once you learn something you’ve learnt it – it’s not so easy for us.

    Um... neither can STEM students. In fact, STEM students have it worse, since it's easier for the teacher to just change some parameters in the task and make it unsolvable without at least some understanding. You won't find code to sort a list of exactly 12 items on SO any more than you'll find a ready-made essay on the theme of nature in Hemingway's works.

    BSc students can just Google their answers or ask Matt on the boys’ Whatsapp what he got for question 1a.

    Because no one in the history of ever has taken someone else's essay, tweaked it a little, then put it up as their own. Oh, wait, no, that's not true. Hell, I wouldn't have passed Literature in high school without help from others, more or less legitimate.

    And if you think paraphrasing is a difficult task, then well... maybe Literature is not for you. Just saying.

    We get given the choice to write our own essay title, too – what the fuck does that even mean? Is it some sort of reverse psychology where our tutors want us to write an essay title to show autonomy. or will they take offence if we don’t pick one of theirs? It’s much harder than finding out what ‘x’ is.

    gasp I CANNOT COPE WITH SO MUCH CHOICE! I NEED A WARM BLANKET, A CUP OF TEA, AND SOMEONE TO TELL ME EXACTLY WHAT TO DO!

    Also, "finding what x is" might very well be worthy of a Fields Medal.

    When it comes to coursework, you’re always going to get higher than us, too. You’ll come back with a smarmy 90%, and we can tell you think our hard earned 71% is rubbish, but it’s all relative: you may have beaten us by 19% but let’s be honest: it’s not really your own work, is it?

    Um... what? No, it's not relative. STEM grading in particular is very much not relative. You either solve a problem correctly, or you don't, with very little leeway for consolation points for effort.

    In BAs, we have to go and write arguments. We have to actually form ideas out of words, and do so in a coherent and convincing way.

    Um, forming ideas out of words is not an academic task. It's a basic life skill. It's what words are there for. Also, no, you're not impressing me with being able to write an argument.

    If our marker is in a bad mood because his cat’s shit on his first edition of Oliver Twist, we won’t know about it, but our grades might be lower.

    Or your essay sucks, just sayin'. Sure, I get it, the relativity of arts grading means you may get points deducted undeservedly, but it's a double edged sword - often it works in one's favor.

    So, yeah, you might score higher than us, but a maths quiz is nowhere near as hard as writing an essay.

    That doesn't follow from the argumentation.

    I’m not saying that your degree is pointless, because it’s probably not. But to think that just because it’s a science which makes you smarter, is, paradoxically, pretty stupid.

    Wah-wah-wah I'm not stupid, you're stupid! Moving on.

    You’re lucky as well because you’re actually taught your degree, whereas a third-year BA student will probably have an average of two hours a week of contact time.

    You're on a shitty university, then. I haven't heard of BA students having fewer classes than BSc ones, or fewer opportunities to contact their thesis supervisor.

    We’ve got to scrawl through thousands of library books before we find information that will help our essays, when yours is all on Blackboard anyway.

    Like fuck it is. In CompSci it's somewhat easier because we've embraced the Internet, but it doesn't mean the things we learn are always common knowledge and never some obscure algorithm someone at the university developed thirty years ago. And don't even get me started on things like chemistry or maths, where relevant knowledge will usually be buried in a paywalled journal issue from the 80s.

    We’re sick of the smug looks you throw at us when you ask if we can balance an equation – because we probably can’t – but as least we can use the right to, two, too in context.

    Are you actually a BA student? Because neither do BSc students learn to balance equations, nor do BA students learn basic grammar. That's high school level math and English. Or even grade school.

    I know, I know, it's fun to mock BScs for not being able to write a proper sentence and BAs for not being able to add two numbers together. But ultimately, that's simply not true.

    We also have literally no friends on our courses.

    Literally no friends. It's literally impossible to make friends on BA courses. It goes against the laws of nature.

    You’re in nine until five everyday which is good for you and your weird bunsen burner pals, but humanities have pretty much no contact with each other; you spend the whole seminar discussing Augustine’s theories which doesn’t give you much of a chance to ask if you want to hit up bar that evening.

    Don't know about you, but we have breaks on our university to socialize. Also, there's very little opportunity to chat during a lecture, or hacking at a programming task in the computer lab.

    Your Science housemates will be talking about how they’re going to go out for dinner next Friday and all you’re concerned with is whether Emily will remember to give you back your pen you lent her last term

    That... says more about your priorities than anything else.

    We’re forced to join weird societies to make friends but still there’ll be a divide between the ‘hard’ subject of Computer Science and the ‘soft’ subject of Drama.

    So make friends with other Drama attendees. What exactly is the problem?

    Your degrees are also more obviously vocational but no, we’re not all going to become History teachers or Religious Studies lecturers. We can become journalists, civil servants, MPs, CEOs, start our own businesses – we can do anything.

    ...good for you? I guess? I mean... you can become an MP or a CEO with just high school education, or no education, and your extensive knowledge of English literature will be largely irrelevant to the job. But... sure, yeah, you can. No one is really arguing you can't.

    And while that threatens you and your marginalised concept of STEM subjects as being intrinsically more academic and well paid

    They... kind of are.

    you are finitely skilled in one area, whereas we have talents in many.

    Talent is completely independent from your education. That's pretty much the definition. If you argued that arts courses cover more diverse fields and are more universal, it would make sense, but it would also be a much harder claim to defend.

    Whether we’re teachers or world leaders, we don’t need to have a BSc next to our name to do it: a BA is good enough.

    Are you arguing for BAs, or are you arguing that a BA is good enough? Yeah, it's good enough, sure. But I thought you were trying to argue that BAs have some value to them.

    It’s obvious that BSc students think BA students want to be them. You ask us: “What’s the point to your degree?”, “Haven’t you learned to read yet?”, “Don’t you wish you were good at Physics?”

    Stop hanging around smug assholes. Which you'll find plenty of in BA courses as well - if not more.

    The answer, quite honestly, is that you’re intimidated by us.

    Certainly not by you, since you can't argue for shit.

    We don’t mock you when you write things like: “Sure your not coming out tonight?”, or: “This lectures really boring”, but we could.

    BUT WE COULD! So keep that in mind, or next time we'll fuck you up by... mocking your grammar?

    Is that what you're trying to threaten people with? It must be the lamest power trip I've ever seen. "I HAVE EATEN FROM THE FORBIDDEN TREE! I POSSESS THE ARCANE KNOWLEDGE OF PROPER GRAMMAR CONSTRUCTS! BOW BEFORE ME!"

    If you’re reading this and can’t tell the issue in those phrases then you’re probably a BSc student

    Heh, heh, BScs can't write English. Right. Except not true.

    Like I've said already - BA courses don't teach English grammar. Grade school does. It's like saying BAs can't add numbers together. It doesn't make fucking sense, because you wouldn't even get to the point where you can apply for a BA course if you couldn't.

    So don’t think we want to be you just because we skim past your inaccuracies which we get bang on point everyday – it’s harder to be a BA student because people take humanities for granted but think that being skilled at Science is a gift.

    No, you just have wildly inaccurate knowledge as to what constitutes being "skilled at science" and being "skilled at humanities". "Balancing equations", "finding x" or "getting grammar bang on point" are not very good indicators of those.

    But then, of course, you come to us to check your CVs, your lab reports, your job applications because to some degree you do realise that our BAs are of value – only though, when it suits you.

    I don't need someone with Literature degree to tell me whether I've made grammar mistakes in my lab report. Just like you don't need a BSc to figure out how much you need to pay at a cash register.

    There’s a real disparity here between the self-professed more ‘academic’ course of a BSc, and the perceived more ‘creative’ side of a BA. People will say: “Oh, well, we need creative people in the world,” as if it’s a substitute for being academic, which isn’t the case.

    I... kind of agree here. Yeah, BA courses require a lot of studying and a lot of knowledge, and actually taking up a job where this knowledge comes into play requires you to master it - you need to know the style of Rembrandt to recognize his newly discovered piece from a $5 junk painted last Thursday, and you need to have a good grasp on politics to work as a political columnist. Some would argue with that one...

    But you undermine your own point by reducing BA courses to "writing proper English" and "forming ideas out of words".

    BA students are academic – just not in the form your logical mind wants us to be. We couldn’t analyse the molecular formation of a cell, but neither could you analyse a line from Taming of the Shrew.

    Try me. And stop acting like BSc students haven't read a book in their entire life.

    Also, I'm pretty sure you learn what cells are made of in high school. Again.

    You think your answers will give you more validity and real world application, but in actuality you forget that it’s humanities, not sciences, that are more concerned with people: note the structure of the word, with ‘human’ lexically leading the subject.

    A point for showing off your BA knowledge. Minus two for trying to use the etymology of the word as an argument.

    It’s time to stop pretending that your BSc is harder and worth more than our BAs, because the reality is that you need us just as much as we need you.

    I'd argue. I could certainly live without this article, for example.



  • @Maciejasjmj said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    BSc students can just Google their answers or ask Matt on the boys’ Whatsapp what he got for question 1a.

    That sentence is terrible. The comments on the article suggest she's corrected multiple mistakes already.

    From her previous hard-hitting piece:

    A bewildered student is claiming that a pigeon lay an egg in her house.

    Looks like I'm at the top of the food chain! ;)



  • I have a BA in Biology. My college only awarded BAs, including Math, Chemistry, and Physics.

    There was also the Engineering school that did awards BScs.



  • @boomzilla said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    STEM students have tons of friends and go out and party a lot

    STEM students take chemistry, and thus know how to turn codeine into morphine.

    So-- yes.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Maciejasjmj said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    You think your answers will give you more validity and real world application, but in actuality you forget that it’s humanities, not sciences, that are more concerned with people: note the structure of the word, with ‘human’ lexically leading the subject.

    A point for showing off your BA knowledge.

    I disagree. The subject is an element of the sentence, not the word (and in that sentence I think the subject is "you"). If they'd instead referred to the root of the word, then maybe they could have scored a point.


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    @Maciejasjmj said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    there's very little opportunity to chat [...] hacking at a programming task in the computer lab.

    :doing_it_wrong:


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Maciejasjmj said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    No, you just have wildly inaccurate knowledge as to what constitutes being "skilled at science" and being "skilled at humanities". "Balancing equations", "finding x" or "getting grammar bang on point" are not very good indicators of those.

    I've found that being good at communicating, both with the written and the spoken word, helps a lot in a STEM career. It isn't good enough to just do good science and engineering in isolation, you've got to tell others about it and find out what they're up to as well.



  • @dkf So warghbl warghbl is out? Son-of-a-bitch...


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @MathNerdCNU said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    So warghbl warghbl is out?

    Yes, but chicken chicken chicken is in.

    Chicken chicken chicken – 04:07
    — Yoram Bauman


  • SockDev

    @dkf That reminds me of a teleconference I was in once with a company in… I forget the country, but their accent made 'check-in' sound like 'chicken'. At one point, a couple of my cow-orkers at the time actually had to leave the room, they were that close to cracking :slight_smile:

    I kept my composure throughout.



  • @RaceProUK said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    I forget the country, but their accent made 'check-in' sound like 'chicken'.

    @r10pez10 said in Mafia V - Corporate Mafia Club Ded:

    0_1459676176137_Capture.PNG



  • @Yamikuronue said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @Maciejasjmj said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    there's very little opportunity to chat [...] hacking at a programming task in the computer lab.

    :doing_it_wrong:

    When I was in secondary school, doing Pascal programming in Win3.1, half of the lesson's time is for doing practice.

    I usually done that within 5 minutes (afterall, how long do you expect to write a simple program with less than 30 LOC including those boilerplate code?), then write code to launch winmine.exe and busy play with it.

    So yes, very little opportunity to chat. :giggity:



  • @cheong said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    When I was in secondary school, doing Pascal programming in Win3.1, half of the lesson's time is for doing practice.
    I usually done that within 5 minutes (afterall, how long do you expect to write a simple program with less than 30 LOC including those boilerplate code?), then write code to launch winmine.exe and busy play with it.

    Then comes university, and you have 90 minutes to write a complete Android app with multiple screens from scratch. Using an incredibly slow computer with too little RAM to handle Android Studio. Oh, and half the time the compiler doesn't work and you have no way to turn in your work (you're not allowed to finish at home).

    And after short break you have another lab class in a building half a mile away, and you have to quickly switch your brain mode from Java+Eclipse to Ocaml+Emacs.


  • BINNED

    But then, of course, you come to us to check your CVs, your lab reports, your job applications because to some degree you do realise that our BAs are of value – only though, when it suits you.

    Nope. Let me break it to you! It is just an excuse because it is hard to find hot girls in the STEM fields :--) :fishing_pole_and_fish:

    FILED UNDER: What is the point of an article about Writing if you cannot spell realize



  • @Maciejasjmj said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    "There is a theme running through this that humanities students have no friends and never socialize but STEM students have tons of friends and go out and party a lot."

    In my experience, that's not actually untrue.

    I knew plenty of people studying non-STEM fields who had plenty of time to socialize and party. One of the "worst" was an English Literature major. These guys would write papers and stuff, sure, but so what? I think the author is just not as smart as she thinks she is, or maybe is just one of those people who take a looong time to do anything. You get that in any field.



  • @Gąska said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @cheong said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    When I was in secondary school, doing Pascal programming in Win3.1, half of the lesson's time is for doing practice.
    I usually done that within 5 minutes (afterall, how long do you expect to write a simple program with less than 30 LOC including those boilerplate code?), then write code to launch winmine.exe and busy play with it.

    Then comes university, and you have 90 minutes to write a complete Android app with multiple screens from scratch. Using an incredibly slow computer with too little RAM to handle Android Studio. Oh, and half the time the compiler doesn't work and you have no way to turn in your work (you're not allowed to finish at home).

    And after short break you have another lab class in a building half a mile away, and you have to quickly switch your brain mode from Java+Eclipse to Ocaml+Emacs.

    In my higher diploma class back in 1999, we use Solaris workstations to write console Java programs, then Java applets. Since I usually prefer to telnet to our 32 CPU cluster server to do the work, change the DISPLAY environment variable to forward the GUI locally, I've never actually feel the slowness you found.

    Since all solaris workstations default automatically mount to your home folder in NFS, you can hardly tell the difference at the first glimpse.

    Btw, at that time when I finished my classwork, I usually enjoy one round of freeciv. Still little chance to chat with classmates. :giggity:



  • So don’t think we want to be you just because we skim past your inaccuracies which we get bang on point everyday

    Everyday what?


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @clatter said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    So don’t think we want to be you just because we skim past your inaccuracies which we get bang on point everyday

    Everyday what?

    bang on point, I think?



  • @Dreikin said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    I disagree. The subject is an element of the sentence, not the word (and in that sentence I think the subject is "you"). If they'd instead referred to the root of the word, then maybe they could have scored a point.

    I think in this case "subject" is referring to the field of study, i.e., Humanities, rather than the grammatical subject of the sentence (which is, indeed, "you").


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @HardwareGeek said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @Dreikin said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    I disagree. The subject is an element of the sentence, not the word (and in that sentence I think the subject is "you"). If they'd instead referred to the root of the word, then maybe they could have scored a point.

    I think in this case "subject" is referring to the field of study, i.e., Humanities, rather than the grammatical subject of the sentence (which is, indeed, "you").

    Perhaps, but that goes to demonstrate the crappy writing too.



  • @SomeWhinyHumanitiesStudent wrote:

    We also have literally no friends on our courses.

    but

    @SomeWhinyHumanitiesStudent wrote:

    we get banged on pointe everyday

    Sounds like the Dance students are having fun, anyway.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @cheong said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    When I was in secondary school, doing Pascal programming in Win3.1, half of the lesson's time is for doing practice.

    That was a lot better than doing Modula-3 on a diskless DECstation workstation running Ultrix. The programs you were tasked with writing usually wouldn't even compile, as the system lacked shared libraries and only had a pitiful amount of:

    1. memory,
    2. swap space (which was remote, over a congested 10BASE2 network), and
    3. space in /tmp.

    A simple hello world program probably shouldn't bring the machine to its knees when you try to compile it.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @dkf said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    swap space (which was remote, over a congested 10BASE2 network), and

    Yeah, I once had the brillant idea of mounting a swapfile over nfs.

    Wouldn't recommend if at all possible to avoid...


  • SockDev

    @Tsaukpaetra said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    mounting a swapfile over nfs

    0_1483148292011_WWYDT.gif


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @RaceProUK said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @Tsaukpaetra said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    mounting a swapfile over nfs

    0_1483148292011_WWYDT.gif

    Three words: 32mb of RAM.


  • SockDev

    @Tsaukpaetra said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @RaceProUK said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @Tsaukpaetra said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    mounting a swapfile over nfs

    0_1483148292011_WWYDT.gif

    Three words: 32mb of RAM.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @RaceProUK said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @Tsaukpaetra said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @RaceProUK said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @Tsaukpaetra said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    mounting a swapfile over nfs

    0_1483148292011_WWYDT.gif

    Three words: 32mb of RAM.

    Wanna know more?

    This was going to be a build machine for Android before I gave up trying to get the toolchain working on arm.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @Tsaukpaetra said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    This was going to be

    For information, for your reference:

    Running Unslung, it was somewhat capable, and served as the house NAS for an unfortunately high number of years.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @RaceProUK said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    0_1483148292011_WWYDT.gif

    In the case of those old workstations, it was so that they could be kept entirely diskless, which would have saved a lot of money and maintenance effort. No idea how much memory they had, but since they were purchased no later than 1992 and probably a year or two prior, the amount of memory they had was probably “small” (though large compared to PCs of the day).



  • @RaceProUK said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @Tsaukpaetra said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @RaceProUK said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @Tsaukpaetra said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    mounting a swapfile over nfs

    0_1483148292011_WWYDT.gif

    Three words: 32mb of RAM.

    When that video was taken that reaction would have been "wow that's a lot of memory" not "OMG how do you do anything with 32MB RAM?" Especially since it was later revealed this was early 1990s hardware.

    Better place for your swapfile instead of nfs: on a RAMdisk. Much faster... Oh wait.



  • @Karla said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    I have a BA in Biology. My college only awarded BAs, including Math, Chemistry, and Physics.

    I actually have a "Bachelor of Information Technology" or BIT. This is common in Australia to have lots of different degree names. Mine was through the science department but there was a similar one offered through the business department: same name but quite different.

    It still isn't clear to me what the real difference (and sameness) is, and is BA always "Bachelor of the Arts" or something different? The art of science?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Zemm said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    It still isn't clear to me what the real difference (and sameness) is

    The actual differences are down to BS.


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    @Zemm In a lot of universities, there's BA for soft degrees (not a lot of math) and BS or BSc for hard degrees (lots of math). In lots others, the distinction is fuzzy and/or non existent, but the stereotypes persist.



  • @Yamikuronue said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    In a lot of universities, there's BA for soft degrees (not a lot of math) and BS or BSc for hard degrees (lots of math).

    The university I went to uses this general distinction, but every degree has minimum core requirements for any degrees that include a certain number of credit-hours in various academic subjects, including English (grammar, rhetoric, literature, etc.) and Arts (music, speech, "canvas"-type art, etc.).



  • @Yamikuronue said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @Zemm In a lot of universities, there's BA for soft degrees (not a lot of math) and BS or BSc for hard degrees (lots of math). In lots others, the distinction is fuzzy and/or non existent, but the stereotypes persist.

    Here it's kind of the opposite. The universities often hand out BAs even in the scientific subjects, and the polytechnics hand out BScs (although that's been changing recently and more universities get BSc permissions). The university course for, say, CS or Physics will usually have more math and be more academic than the respective polytechnic course, which tends to focus more on practical applications. IOW, a BA in Computer Science will make you a good researcher, while a BSc will make you a better programmer.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Maciejasjmj said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    Here it's kind of the opposite.

    And here it's totally up to the individual institution, with a preference for associating science-y things with BSc and arts-y things with the BA but no real rule. I wouldn't look at whether it was a BA or a BSc; they're both just degrees. And they both mean that the person in question has a lot more to learn.



  • @dkf said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    And they both mean that the person in question has a lot more to learn.

    QFT



  • @dkf said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    I wouldn't look at whether it was a BA or a BSc; they're both just degrees.

    Yeah, it's the "B" that's the important letter there. Though looking at the actual major is important.



  • @dkf said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    And they both mean that the person in question has a lot more to learn.

    That very much depends on what they intend to do. And how much they know outside of university.

    I think we've had plenty of discussion about degrees not being as important as their owners often make them out to be...



  • @Yamikuronue said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @Zemm In a lot of universities, there's BA for soft degrees (not a lot of math) and BS or BSc for hard degrees (lots of math). In lots others, the distinction is fuzzy and/or non existent, but the stereotypes persist.

    Exactly. At the school where I finally got my degree, I could have done a BA or BS in Computer Science. The main difference was the BA required two years of college-level foreign language, while the BS didn't. (The BS required slightly more math and CS classes instead.) Most of the science and technology degrees were available in either flavor with similar minor differences.

    Judging from the classes I took, students make plenty of friends and blow off schoolwork just as much no matter the subject.



  • @Maciejasjmj: with computer science, mathematics or chemistry, a good student should be building a mental model that lets them deduce what they haven't memorized. You don't have to remember nearly as much if you can apply what you do know to infer the rest.

    This is why I barely had to study in most of my CIS classes. Sql? Programming? Installing windows? Troubleshooting PC Problems? Top to bottom, everything was already there... and the stuff that wasn't? Multiple choice tests where you could, at worst, rule out 2 of 4 answers and have a 50/50 shot on a guess.

    I'd be FUKT if I had to do Chemistry, Physics, Biology, History or any of the multitude of classes that require rote memorization and regurgitation. History... I love learning it but I hate remembering it.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @WernerCD said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    Multiple choice tests where you could, at worst, rule out 2 of 4 answers and have a 50/50 shot on a guess.

    Be careful of such things. Not all MCQ exams are scored by counting up the number of right answers; some have negative scores for some answers, and some even require that you get critical questions right or it is an instant fail. They probably ought to tell you if this is what is going on…



  • @dkf said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @WernerCD said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    Multiple choice tests where you could, at worst, rule out 2 of 4 answers and have a 50/50 shot on a guess.

    Be careful of such things. Not all MCQ exams are scored by counting up the number of right answers; some have negative scores for some answers, and some even require that you get critical questions right or it is an instant fail. They probably ought to tell you if this is what is going on…

    I had to do a phsyics test once, where the scoring worked like this:

    • Every "question" consists of 5 true/false statements
    • You get 0.2 points for a correct answer
    • You get -0.2 points for an incorrect answer
    • You get 0 points for no answer.

    So at the end, 5 correct answers is worth 1 point. Most of the questions were like this:

    a) Statement (T/F)
    b) Some other statement (T/F)
    c) Yet another statement (T/F)
    d) Moar statement (T/F)
    e) Soar mtatement (T/F)

    But then one of them was this:

    Assuming the experiment is set up like that and the constants are this and this, what is the value of this variable?
    a) 0.2 (T/F)
    b) 0.4 (T/F)
    c) 0.6 (T/F)
    d) 0.8 (T/F)
    e) 1.2 (T/F)

    So you could say all 5 are false and still get 0.6 points.

    @RaceProUK said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @dkf That reminds me of a teleconference I was in once with a company in… I forget the country, but their accent made 'check-in' sound like 'chicken'. At one point, a couple of my cow-orkers at the time actually had to leave the room, they were that close to cracking :slight_smile:

    I kept my composure throughout.

    I recently heard a story where someone was teleconferencing with Canadian colleagues, the work was very stressing, and time to time this is what they would hear:
    KEEP FUCK US!
    After a while they worked up the nerve to ask what the problem is, and it turned out that's how a Canadian pronounces
    Keep focus!


  • area_deu

    @Maciejasjmj said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    There is a theme running through this that humanities students have no friends and never socialize but STEM students have tons of friends and go out and party a lot.

    In my experience, that's not actually untrue.

    I know at least one STEM student that managed to get his MSc (in Electrical Engineering and Information Technology) without making a single friend at the Uni. Source: It me :|

    So, as expected, it seems both sides exist. Big surprise XD


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Akko There are people who avoid making friends their whole life. The question is, though, do you blame your friendless time studying on getting an MSc instead of an MA?

    Filed Under: Source: @aliceif refuses to talk to me!


  • area_deu

    @Kuro said in BAs are harder than BScs (:giggity:):

    @Akko There are people who avoid making friends their whole life. The question is, though, do you blame your friendless time studying on getting an MSc instead of an MA?

    Filed Under: Source: @aliceif refuses to talk to me!

    Nah I blame it entirely on me being completely devoid of social skills ^^"


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