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  • 0_1478340492769_unknown.png



  • 0_1478341921889_score.PNG

    That was a very conservative run. First I thought it was more about the possible of forming words, but later it seemed to be a simple vocabulary test.



  • 0_1478341634871_words.png

    Some (un-)educated guesses involved, though.



  • 0_1478343399630_Screenshot 2016-11-05 10.47.30_cropped.png

    with a bit of guessing and am not at all sure that 'walmart' ought to count as a valid English word.



  • I gave them all my info (was feeling uncharacteristically nice) and was greeted back with THIS:

    0_1478347800523_tmp.png


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    0_1478348817307_upload-1b82a3a9-375e-4f4f-b4b4-0e6010e7fa04

    Eh, fair enough given my level of "formal" education in English...

    Learning most of this from TV / Internet / games can trip you up though... I messed up on polliwog, didn't know that's really an alternate expression for a tadpole, I buttumed it was a trick question where they put in a Pokemon name (I remember there is something similar, after googling that one's a polliwag).

    Also, damn it, can you stop breaking the spelling? "kart" is a valid synonym for a go-cart? Really? Fuck off!



  • 0_1478358117431_Screenshot 2016-11-05 at 10.01.40.png

    I misread one of the gibberish words as "aluminum".


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    I was about to make a joke about me getting a higher score than some of native speakers but...

    You know, there were many words in there related to various science disciplines, were there not? So... how valid is this test, in general, anyway? I mean, I got some of it right because it made sense to me that it's a valid term, but that's because I love weird science shit (not that I know it well, but I love knowing at least something about it).

    Meaning, if you're well-spoken in general but just not into science you could get a lower score than me just because I read a lot of articles about science stuff, but never read any of the great English/American literature in its original form.



  • Since it said it penalized yes-on-nonwords, I went with No whenever I was uncertain. I hit No on "drolly" and realized half a moment later that it's a word, but had no way of going back to change my answer (that I could see). I also wasn't sure how strict its dictionary would be; a couple of the compounded words looked questionable enough that I hit No, but they turned out to be real words.

    0_1478359770397_Untitled.png



  • @Onyx said in 📖:

    "kart" is a valid synonym for a go-cart? Really? Fuck off!

    It wasn't called 'Mario go-cart', now was it?


  • :belt_onion:

    @CreatedToDislikeThis said in 📖:

    I gave them all my info (was feeling uncharacteristically nice) and was greeted back with THIS:

    0_1478347800523_tmp.png

    I am fairly certain I did not see any naningly!! Perhaps they have problem with NaN

    0_1478374203034_Screenshot from 2016-11-05 12-29-00.png


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    I feel pretty good about this. I must have misread "lavation" and "assonant", but eh.

    0_1478374551047_vocabularytest.png

    What the hell is an adduct? And scherzo? That sounds like a Hebrew insult...


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    One of the problems I have with this is that the intro emphasizes the test is about English (American) words, and then it throws in words which might be used commonly in English speech but aren't actually English. Trousseaux, digestif, and ricotta in my case. I was wondering if they test considers them non-words since they're not actually English, or if it considers them valid because they're commonly used in English.



  • @blek said in 📖:

    What the hell is an adduct? And scherzo?

    Didn't you click the little button?


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @coldandtired Yeah, but that didn't help me. The buttons lead to searches for each word on some dictionary site, and with adduct it just rambled incoherently about "pulling towards the median axis of the body" or some shit, so I'm none the wiser because I'm too drunk to process that.



  • @blek said in 📖:

    I'm too drunk to process that.

    That makes your score even more impressive :)


  • mod

    @Onyx said in 📖:

    there were many words in there related to various science disciplines, were there not?

    A number of the ones I got I recognized roots and suffixes tho.



  • @blek said in 📖:

    What the hell is an adduct? And scherzo?

    Adduct is, AFAIK, a verb. The form of the word that I am more familiar with is the noun adductor, which refers to certain muscles that pull in a certain way (Edit: toward the center of the body, based on the definition you posted. Edit 2: I remember now; it's been a few years since I did any weight training, so it took a while. Hip adductor muscle group: the muscles on the inside of the thigh that squeeze the legs together, vs. the hip abductor group, on the outside of the thigh/hip that spread the legs apart.).

    Scherzo is Italian for joke, and is used as a loan word in English as a musical term for a composition (or more commonly a part of one, especially the third movement of a symphony) written in a light-hearted mood. I think it is pretty rare outside of classical music, so I'm not at all sure it's a good test of general English vocabulary. But then somebody said it was also pretty heavy on science terminology, too, so I'm not sure it's all that well-designed overall. (I haven't tried taking it myself, yet, so my opinion is based entirely on second-hand information.)


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @HardwareGeek There are a bunch of words from "niche" areas in the test - various scientific disciplines, culture, even religion. One of the words I got was "ecclesiastically" which is also something I wouldn't expect most people to know.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @HardwareGeek said in 📖:

    Scherzo is Italian for joke, and is used as a loan word in English as a musical term for a composition (or more commonly a part of one, especially the third movement of a symphony) written in a light-hearted mood.

    It's usually in 3/4 time too, and tends to be written to a general pattern A-B-A; the central part is known as a trio, and comes from a somewhat older form known as a minuet-and-trio.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @blek said in 📖:

    One of the words I got was "ecclesiastically" which is also something I wouldn't expect most people to know.

    Pertaining to Eccles, a district of Manchester.  :tram: 


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @dkf said in 📖:

    @blek said in 📖:

    One of the words I got was "ecclesiastically" which is also something I wouldn't expect most people to know.

    Pertaining to Eccles, a district of Manchester.  :tram: 

    Ah, given that, I'm going to assume the pronunciation is "Els"? :tropical_fish:



  • @dkf said in 📖:

    @blek said in 📖:

    One of the words I got was "ecclesiastically" which is also something I wouldn't expect most people to know.

    Pertaining to Eccles, a district of Manchester.  :tram: 

    Actually, from the Greek εκκλησία (TIL that Android autocomplete works in Greek, too!), meaning church. Thus ecclesiastical, pertaining to matters of a church, especially governance.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Onyx said in 📖:

    @dkf said in 📖:

    @blek said in 📖:

    One of the words I got was "ecclesiastically" which is also something I wouldn't expect most people to know.

    Pertaining to Eccles, a district of Manchester.  :tram: 

    Ah, given that, I'm going to assume the pronunciation is "Els"? :tropical_fish:

    The accent is (deliberately) stupid, but…
    "What time is it Eccles?".wmv – 03:36
    — Richard Bailey


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @r10pez10 said in 📖:

    Awe FFS, since my computer is a hybrid tablet, the site thinks I have no keyboard (assuming because mobile), so I have to use the touchscreen (no, it doesn't respond to clicks of the mouse).

    Alright, lets do this I guess...


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @Tsaukpaetra said in 📖:

    Alright, lets do this I guess...

    0_1478386189265_upload-42c155a9-44b2-4ff9-9a41-477105a68f82

    Darn, not top level. But then again I am suffocating using the touch interface, so...



  • 0_1478399188864_upload-0a20c745-d58c-496d-a80b-cbfdc1310e59

    For a lot of words it's like "the root makes sense, but the way it's used is not quite right".



  • I got a perfect score:

    0_1478400746564_upload-f525de29-51ec-40c1-a236-3a662c688858

    :giggity:

    Also diagnosticate? Really? I'm so going to start using that in my everyday speech.


  • area_deu

    I clicked no on a good few real words because they were compound words for which I could not imagine this combination of words to have an actual meaning, I mean how is shiftlessness a word and what the fuck does it have to do with shifting. Also I was suspicious and thought swathly, rosary, pertly and gloze were words deliberately constructed to confuse you because they sound like the kind of weird word like smarmy you use when you want to express how something is weird, archaic or awkward in addition to the meaning of the word.

    Also I would object to a good few of the terms on the basis that this test should take words that a well educated person should reasonably be able to recognize like "ecclesiastically", but the test often goes beyond this and takes words that are from a niche that you can only know when your understanding and interest goes well into expert territory, especially the medicin ones I got. They just go beyond a deeper common knowledge and are simply expert terms.

    Still, 74% for someone that is not a native speaker and can't even write an orthographically correct paragraph in his native language makes me kinda happy.

    @dangeRuss said in 📖:

    Also diagnosticate? Really? I'm so going to start using that in my everyday speech.

    I think that is a mistake on their part, the linked dictionary only gives two latin texts as usage examples, to if they pull the words from there they might have fucked up and included a few latin terms that are not valid english.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @Quwertzuiopp By the by, since I don't think you have access to the "Say my name" thread, this is my current mental pronunciation of it:

    Coo-were-t'-sea-ope.

    Edit: For future reference



  • @blek said in 📖:

    and with adduct it just rambled incoherently about "pulling towards the median axis of the body" or some shit

    Now that you mention it, adduct is the opposite of abduct.

    Abduct: raise your arms away from your torso, open your legs :giggity:
    Adduct: bring your arms closer to your torso, close your legs.



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    If I could have gone back I would have said yes to "groundswell".

    Well, now I feel more orrimonticated than a bectical chaneyeur.


  • mod

    @Quwertzuiopp said in 📖:

    shiftlessness a word and what the fuck does it have to do with shifting

    Shifting is moving. Someone who is shiftless is lazy, they don't get up and move around. Shiftlessness is the property of being shiftless.



  • I got 60%



  • Provided no profile information.

    Stuck on the "Press YES or NO to start" screen. Neither button does anything.



  • 0_1478535743990_upload-d9675332-d772-437e-a855-d04274d90a70

    Yeah, I can live with that you henbane motherfuckers.


  • mod

    @blek said in 📖:

    One of the problems I have with this is that the intro emphasizes the test is about English (American) words, and then it throws in words which might be used commonly in English speech but aren't actually English. Trousseaux, digestif, and ricotta in my case. I was wondering if they test considers them non-words since they're not actually English, or if it considers them valid because they're commonly used in English.

    Ricotta is a type of cheese, I know it because my wife uses it frequently in recipes. It is certainly part of the English language.

    Anyway I got this:

    0_1478536169594_upload-b1b419da-ec5f-4957-972d-d6c9d20afca1

    I got thrown off by several of the non-words because they were misspellings of actual words, and I wasn't paying that close of attention: arosed instead of aroused, cheerleder instead of cheerleader. That kind of thing. They should have made sure that the non-words were sufficiently different from real words to avoid that kind of issue.



  • 0_1478537447762_upload-9860f410-4f99-4b95-8ebf-23fccc80d5cf

    not bad, given that most of my english comes from informal learning.

    also:

    Words you did not know
    (...)
    assoil

    really, english?



  • @Jarry said in 📖:

    also:

    Words you did not know
    (...)
    assoil

    really, english?

    It's an archaic synonym for absolve, pardon, or acquit. Dictionary.com says it comes from French, but I think it makes better sense to break it up into its constituent parts. The root "soil" is a fairly common word that means "dirt", or as a verb "make dirty". The prefix is "ab-", which means "away from". Because of assimilation, the "b" became an "s" to match the following consonant, so the parts are "as-" and "soil".
    You can "have dirt" on someone, which means you have knowledge of their criminal actions, and you can "soil" someone's reputation with such knowledge, so "soil away from" would mean to (successfully) defend them or absolve them of guilt.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    "Bossism" and "discourser" are words? I think a WTDWTFer wrote this site...

    You said yes to 77% of the existing words.
    
    You said yes to 0% of the nonwords.
    
    This gives you a corrected score of 77% - 0% = 77%. 
    


  • 0_1478540384333_upload-a75676ad-4bfe-41e7-9fa1-977a69b79e31

    Missed words: kinglet, inkle, advertence, changeful, hyperdulia. Spelling checker doesn't like any of these either :-)

    Recognized words: trussing, abolitionary, promiscuity, militaristic, yet, timely, derider, underfoot, foghorn, cologne, martially, beaverboard, newsgroup, semiotics, synoptic, wandering, churchgoer, charier, endanger, unfarmed, apogee, debacle, jesuit, phonological, formalization, folkdance, brusque, ruggedness, trumpery, delirious, malocclusion, sympathizer, scapegrace, indissolubility, topaz, atwitter, godlessness, interrelatedness, composition, consultant, teutonic, untypically, skullduggery, gunboat, prior, racial, stoplight, igloo, brachiosaur, ensuite, pompom, selectivity, assize, caterwauling, apply, unexplainable, leftism, magnetograph, fandangle, anesthetization, salvo, godhead, irrigative, boundlessness, luxuriousness.

    Non-words: eyeglost, dencutant, canfinomin, unperly, advosed, conwount, exaybra, cuge, sudmigedly, bithermime, ranless, moroun, teleposh, insirbrial, malfbey, flesly, rooline, sanchboom, aplide, peeforing, impaably, etcery, holligra, amremoo, distrerced, foapnament, formadant, tanderheit, courds, desiclite.



  • 0_1478545519536_2016-11-07 14_03_04-Vocabulary test.png


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @flabdablet said in 📖:

    unperly

    Are you sure that's not a word (meaning in a style of code that is readable by mortal programmers instead of being the result of an ADHD chicken attack in a typography factory)?



  • I had to dencutant over it on first eyeglosting. After a while I just teleposhed it as a flesly bithermime and sudmigedly conwount on to the etcery despite peeforing a little distrerced. No point getting insirbrial about a malfbey online test.



  • @flabdablet said in 📖:

    Missed words: kinglet, inkle, advertence, changeful, hyperdulia. Spelling checker doesn't like any of these either

    I took them to heart in their warning about not saying "yes" to stuff you didn't actually know. So for stuff that looked like suffix salad on actual words I tended to select "no" if I couldn't recall seeing it anywhere.


  • Impossible Mission - B

    Words you did not know
    coryphaeus
    nubble
    gouache
    suety

    Nonwords you responded YES to
    pleccidular
    dexescioable



  • @boomzilla same same. "Kinglet" sounded too cutesy to be real; didn't recognize it as a possible bird name. "Inkle" just sounds made-up, though to be fair so does "aglet" (which wasn't on the test but comes from an overlapping realm of jargon). "Advertence" looked like a back-construction like "gruntled" and I didn't trust it to be real. "Changeful" is plausible bizspeak but I'd never seen it used, and "hyperdulia" was altogether too specialist for me.



  • @japonicus said in 📖:

    with a bit of guessing and am not at all sure that 'walmart' ought to count as a valid English word.

    Are their any combinations of 20 or fewer Latin alphabet letters, in which consonants alternate with vowels, that aren't valid English words? :trolleybus:

    Filed Under: Pure as a cribhouse whore


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @ScholRLEA said in 📖:

    @japonicus said in 📖:

    with a bit of guessing and am not at all sure that 'walmart' ought to count as a valid English word.

    Are their any combinations of 20 or fewer Latin alphabet letters, in which consonants alternate with vowels, that aren't valid English words? :trolleybus:

    Well, “nogelifupewal” seems to be without definition; there's plenty of room for expansion of the language yet!


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