Why Google's Docs and Spreadsheets will never work



  • Not really a wtf but this is a perfect example of why docs and spreadsheets isn't a viable alternative to local applications.

     

     

    img66/9171/googledownyx0.jpg<script type="text/javascript"></script>

     



  • Desktops have downtime too. I suspect Google is more reliable than the bad old days of WinBSODs 98



  • Desktops are under your control, you get a bsod, you can always restart and be back up in 2 minutes.  Gmail has now been down for about 30 minutes and is completely out of my control except for trying every couple minutes to see if the issue is fixed yet.



  • Bingo.

    Buy Microsoft Office!

    No, honestly, it's good... dammit, nobody believes me anymore.



  • Or use OO.org and spare yourself several hundred bucks.

    BTW, it does run faster than Microsoft Office on my PC.
     



  • @m0ffx said:

    Desktops have downtime too. I suspect Google is more reliable than the bad old days of WinBSODs 98

     While you're probably right, the "bad old days of WinBSODs 98" are 9 years old; Google's apps are current.
     



  • @Cloaked User said:

    @m0ffx said:

    Desktops have downtime too. I suspect Google is more reliable than the bad old days of WinBSODs 98

     While you're probably right, the "bad old days of WinBSODs 98" are 9 years old; Google's apps are current.
     

    I think you're missing the point. The point is, if you get a BSOD, you can still access your documents onli- oh, hold on a second... 



  • Not to mention those documents that are supposed to be secured.  Using Google you have no idea what their level of security actually is.  Is a Google employee able to read this info?  Are they making proper backups of this data?  Can we show proper transfer of ownership on a document?  There are many reasons why a company can't go with an online solution.



  • @CDarklock said:

    Bingo.

    Buy Microsoft Office!

    No, honestly, it's good... dammit, nobody believes me anymore.

    Excel is the only Microsoft program I actually find consistently more useful and efficient than the competition (although Visio is pretty good). OO.org Writer runs circles around Word.  Most of the other stuff in there I try to avoid.



  • I can't see any advantage to web applications over normal applications, aside from the ability to access your "documents" from any computer. Since it's easy enough to put your file on a floppy, upload it somewhere, or use one of those USB flash drives, I don't consider this to be worth it.

    My theory about this bizarre antipathy toward the desktop computer is that it's being pushed by media companies, who are coming to realize that all their DRM schemes are ultimately futile as long as you can play a DVD on a computer you have physical access to. Any program can be cracked, but only as long as you actually have the program.



  • I thought it worked well for our College Bowl pool last December, although it seemed a bit slow and glitchy.  I wouldn't want to use it for anything more serious yet.  Excel is pretty hard to beat, really.



  • @shadowman said:

    I thought it worked well for our College Bowl pool last December, although it seemed a bit slow and glitchy.  I wouldn't want to use it for anything more serious yet.  Excel is pretty hard to beat, really.

    Slow and Glitchy now equals Works Well?

    Careful, statements like this are always later taken out of context.  Personally I wouldn't call slow and glitchy as working well, regardless of the usage it was put to. 



  • @CapitalT said:

    Or use OO.org and spare yourself several hundred bucks.

    BTW, it does run faster than Microsoft Office on my PC.

    Or go to the launch tour and get MS Office 2007 for free, like I did.

     



  • There is a simple solution: cache local copies of documents every time they are saved online. Then add Javascript to revert to these copies when the server conneciton is lost. It would be similar to MS Word's rescued document process, and of course users would need to overwrite their online copy. For collaborative documents, a versioning system like that used in wikis would work.



  • @antonrojo said:

    There is a simple solution: cache local copies of documents every time they are saved online. Then add Javascript to revert to these copies when the server conneciton is lost. It would be similar to MS Word's rescued document process, and of course users would need to overwrite their online copy. For collaborative documents, a versioning system like that used in wikis would work.

    Simple?
     



  • @Arancaytar said:


    A monk asked Joshu: isTrue(dog.hasBuddhaNature()) ?
    Joshu replied: FILENOTFOUND

    Off topic...but you win. 🙂

    -cw



  • @RandomPoster said:

    Not really a wtf but this is a perfect example of why docs and spreadsheets isn't a viable alternative to local applications.

     

     

    img66/9171/googledownyx0.jpg <SCRIPT type=text/javascript></SCRIPT>

     

    I'd have to disagree complete, you have to remember that these kind of services are still in it's early years, and are by no means finished. How old is The MS office line now? or even OO line? where as this is not even 2 years old.

    @Goplat said:

    I can't see any advantage to web applications over normal applications, aside from the ability to access your "documents" from any computer. Since it's easy enough to put your file on a floppy, upload it somewhere, or use one of those USB flash drives, I don't consider this to be worth it.

    There are several other advantages other than having access to your files from any computer. One of the foremost is licensing costs. Currently most companies,be it large or small, are required to purchase a license for each machine. However with such a system as 'Google Office' licensing costs can be a little more flexable. The office system can allow a certain number of instances to be run at a single time, cutting the cost for business, so instead of paying for 100 licenses when only 40 instances are ever used at one time you could now purchase 40 licenses and still have the app available on 100 machines, cutting your cost by 60%.

    @KattMan said:

    Not to mention those documents that are supposed to be secured.  Using Google you have no idea what their level of security actually is.  Is a Google employee able to read this info?  Are they making proper backups of this data?  Can we show proper transfer of ownership on a document?  There are many reasons why a company can't go with an online solution.

    Given my above scenario, I'm pretty sure Google will release an Intranet System, where a business can purchase such a solution and set it up within their business therefore not requiring to exchange any confidential documents/information with google or any third party if neccessary



  • @Arancaytar said:

    @antonrojo said:

    There is a simple solution: cache local copies of documents every time they are saved online. Then add Javascript to revert to these copies when the server conneciton is lost. It would be similar to MS Word's rescued document process, and of course users would need to overwrite their online copy. For collaborative documents, a versioning system like that used in wikis would work.

    Simple?
     

    Yes!* Just use Dojo Toolkit (http://www.dojotoolkit.com/) with their offline storage and synch ability (click demos, storage, then run the 'Moxie' demo). Then, on the server side, just use any one of a dozen open source wiki's as a base.

     

    * implementation details left as an exercise for the reader.



  • @Hitsuji said:

    @KattMan said:

    Not to mention those documents that are supposed to be secured.  Using Google you have no idea what their level of security actually is.  Is a Google employee able to read this info?  Are they making proper backups of this data?  Can we show proper transfer of ownership on a document?  There are many reasons why a company can't go with an online solution.

    Given my above scenario, I'm pretty sure Google will release an Intranet System, where a business can purchase such a solution and set it up within their business therefore not requiring to exchange any confidential documents/information with google or any third party if neccessary

    That would be an advancement and does not require something like Google, even MS Office can follow that model.  Call it a serviced application model, where a certain number of licenses are purchased so the info can be used by only that number of people at once.  Have we seen this before?  Yes, take a look at SQL Server, there was a connection count that could be set and additional connection licenses could be purchased.  It didn't matter who was connecting as long as there was a connection left available.

    So why hasn't this model propagated?   I'm not sure, but maybe this idea from Google will become the stepping stone to corporations having the ability to do this internally.  For the personal user, this still leaves a hole.  Who wants to buy a whole second machine to serve this from, and how many of them are really concerned about their document security.



  • Even better, spend $349 and get all M$ software for one low price.  Anyone need ten licenses of O2K7 Enterprise, 10 licenses of Vista Business, 10 licenses of Visio 2K7 and more?  Direct from the horses mouth:

     https://partner.microsoft.com/40016455

     Woo-hoo!!

    January kit contents:  https://partner.microsoft.com/40013779

    Nice!!


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