Internet of shit



  • @Jaloopa said in Internet of shit:

    @ben_lubar said in Internet of shit:

    I mean, I don't talk near my computer when I'm not intentionally recording my voice to send over Discord or whatever. Do people actually do that?

    Some people have a social life and might be in the same room as both their computer and another person. I understand that in such a situation the etiquette is to talk occasionally rather than sitting in silence

    Unless they're teenagers - from observation, I believe they're only allowed to textuse a phone.

    Edited for my intent



  • @dcon said in Internet of shit:

    Unless they're teenagers - from observation, I believe they're only allowed to textSnapchat.

    At least according to my eldest.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Scarlet_Manuka
    People use Snapchat for other purposes than sending self-destroying nudes? TIL. I guess I'm not up-to-date on the latest texting trends. :belt_onion:



  • @asdf I believe it's all about the "funny" filters and such these days.



  • @asdf said in Internet of shit:

    latest stexting trends

    obvious


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @asdf said in Internet of shit:

    @Scarlet_Manuka
    People use Snapchat for other purposes than sending self-destroying nudes? TIL. I guess I'm not up-to-date on the latest texting trends. :belt_onion:

    See the new "stories" thing that Facebook is trying desperately to push despite nobody using it? That's apparently copying what snapchat's used for these days




  • mod

    @LaoC said in Internet of shit:

    In Soviet RussiaIllinois, headphones listen you

    Wiretapping? Are you fucking serious?

    Your headphones reporting what music you listen to is kind of creepy, but it's nowhere near illegal fucking wiretapping. WTF?



  • @Yamikuronue said in Internet of shit:

    Wiretapping? Are you fucking serious?

    Never go full Trump.


  • mod

    @boomzilla Was that at me or the article? I suppose I should have quoted for context either way:

    The civil complaint alleges that Bose collects "the names of any music and audio tracks" played through the headphones, along with the customer's personally identifiable serial number. It also says the information gets sent to third parties, including "data miner Segment.io."

    Lawyers for Zak argue that this constitutes wiretapping.



  • @Yamikuronue said in Internet of shit:

    Was that at me or the article?

    The article. I was riffing on Trump's accusation of airquoted wiretapping. I hope this suit gets thrown out if that's their actual argument. If they're breaching some privacy agreement or whatever then the lawyers need to attack from that angle, but I think a wiretapping claim is dumb here.


  • mod

    @boomzilla Yeah, agreed. I don't think there's really anything to sue over here, it's just a case of "don't buy this shit if you want to keep your data private".



  • @dcon said in Internet of shit:

    Unless they're teenagers - from observation, I believe they're only allowed to text.

    I've been told that the new hip thing is to dictate your "text" to the phone (via speech-to-text), send it as a text message with $whatever, and then have the phone read it to you via text-to-speech.

    In this instance, by "I've been told" I mean that this is the only reasonable explanation that I could arrive at after being made to listen to a rather weird "conversation" on a train. (On a slightly related note - people who use the speaker phone mode in public need to be punched in the face.)



  • @Yamikuronue Well, it still might be actionable. I don't know what the law says about phoning home with this sort of thing vis-à-vis informing the customer or what Bose did (the complaint, linked in TFA says that Bose doesn't inform about this). It sounds similar to what the FTC went after Vizio for:



  • @Yamikuronue said in Internet of shit:

    In Soviet RussiaIllinois, headphones listen you

    Wiretapping? Are you fucking serious?

    I don't know the details of the relevant law but I guess their argument is that using the metadata you can usually recreate a fairly accurate audio stream so it may be equivalent. Considering that "mail and wire fraud" explicitly includes acts that include neither mail nor wires and another Illinois Schmuck was convicted of it because somewhere in the course of his fraud someone mailed something somewhere, the equivalence doesn't look so weak any more. Even if they aren't arguing audio streams: there is data communication between your audio equipment and your headphones that you can reasonably expect to be private, Bluetooth being encrypted an all, and if Bose sends even parts of that communication elsewhere without disclosing it, that's a serious invasion of privacy.



  • @LaoC said in Internet of shit:

    Schmuck

    I found this article linked in the references to be quite amusing.



  • @hungrier said in Internet of shit:

    @LaoC said in Internet of shit:

    Schmuck

    I found this article linked in the references to be quite amusing.

    Reminds me of "Everything is Illuminated":

    A Jewish word?” “Yiddish. Like schmuck.” “What does it mean schmuck?” ”Someone who does something that you don’t agree with is a schmuck.” “Teach me another.” “Putz.” “What does that mean?” “It’s like schmuck.” “Teach me another.” ”Schmendrink.” “What does that mean?” “It’s also like schmuck.” “Do you know any words that are not like schmuck?” He pondered for a moment. “Shalom,” he said, ”which is actually three words, but that’s Hebrew, not Yiddish. Everything I can think of is basically schmuck. The Eskimos have four hundred words for snow, and the Jews have four hundred for schmuck.



  • @LaoC said in Internet of shit:

    I don't know the details of the relevant law but I guess their argument is that using the metadata you can usually recreate a fairly accurate audio stream so it may be equivalent

    Looks like this:

    As I read the situation, the app is able to integrate with a music player in order to pause, etc. and presumably read the metadata about what's being played. And it's the transmission of the metadata that's the problem in the complaint. But that information isn't being transferred anywhere and intercepted, I think.

    Well, except for how the app sends data from the phone to the headphones, so apparently the app has wiretapped itself. Reading down the claims, that's the theory they're presenting. It's possible that they can convince a court on this but I still think it's the wrong approach to take on this issue. I suspect they figured the privacy angle wasn't enough to get a settlement so they upped the ante with the tendentious wiretapping claim.


  • area_can

    0_1492706455066_upload-5949220f-a4eb-44b9-8a9e-30116b45dda6

    remotely turn on/off...and adjust temperature or time on your oven

    :scream:



  • @bb36e what could possibly go wrong?



  • @bb36e oooooh.... the hacking possibilities...



  • @boomzilla said in Internet of shit:

    vis-à-vis

    How there hipster.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @bb36e said in Internet of shit:

    0_1492706455066_upload-5949220f-a4eb-44b9-8a9e-30116b45dda6

    remotely turn on/off...and adjust temperature or time on your oven

    :scream:

    This goes in the same bucket as "smart" washing machines or kettles. Why have the ability to remotely turn on something that I need to be in the room to fill/empty/complete the process?

    New idea: IoT shoes that tie or untie the laces via an app on your phone. No more need to actually touch the shoes on your feet to do them up



  • @Jaloopa said in Internet of shit:

    New idea: IoT shoes that tie or untie the laces via an app on your phone. No more need to actually touch the shoes on your feet to do them up

    But they only work when there's an active internet connection and only with compatible shoes that you get on a monthly subscription basis.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @hungrier obviously. I didn't think I'd have to spell that out.

    Also, the laces have an expected lifespan of 6 weeks and the shoes fall apart if you put normal laces in them



  • @Jaloopa said in Internet of shit:

    New idea: IoT shoes that tie or untie the laces via an app on your phone. No more need to actually touch the shoes on your feet to do them up

    Better idea: a "smart" phone. A phone you can dial remotely so you can talk remotely while you talk remotely.


  • area_can

    @dcon said in Internet of shit:

    @bb36e oooooh.... the hacking possibilities...

    Something something real firewalls



  • @bb36e said in Internet of shit:

    @dcon said in Internet of shit:

    @bb36e oooooh.... the hacking possibilities...

    Something something real firewalls

    Pretty sure that's something IoT makers (and users) know nothing about.


  • sockdevs

    @bb36e said in Internet of shit:

    real firewall

    Like this?



  • @RaceProUK The only problem with that is that IoT devices probably emit very toxic fumes when burned... but yes.


  • sockdevs

    Does this count?

    It's £299.99.

    I'm not joking.

    Seriously, I'm not joking.



  • @RaceProUK said in Internet of shit:

    Seriously, I'm not joking.

    :Idontbelieveit.jpg:


  • sockdevs

    @Luhmann said in Internet of shit:

    :Idontbelieveit.jpg:

    I'm afraid I only have it in PNG form:
    0_1492872666881_I don't believe it.png



  • @RaceProUK
    I'm on mobile so I wasn't even going to try


  • area_can

    @RaceProUK looks like that's the devs schtick

    0_1492884341354_Screenshot_2017-04-22-14-05-12.png


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @RaceProUK said in Internet of shit:

    Does this count?

    It's £299.99.

    I'm not joking.

    Seriously, I'm not joking.

    Made by this A$$hole...

    0_1492930374177_upload-a2ffb988-d2f7-4ef4-9a5c-e6ed282c264f


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @bb36e said in Internet of shit:

    0_1492706455066_upload-5949220f-a4eb-44b9-8a9e-30116b45dda6

    remotely turn on/off...and adjust temperature or time on your oven

    :scream:

    The only possible use I could see with that is some kind of reminder... "You left the stove on, dufus".

    That could actually be useful...



  • @Jaloopa said in Internet of shit:

    Why have the ability to remotely turn on something that I need to be in the room to fill/empty/complete the process?

    This is already common in ovens and the like. Generally it's so you can fill it in the morning and have it turn on so it's finished just before you come home.



  • @coldandtired said in Internet of shit:

    Generally it's so you can fill it in the morning and have it turn on so it's finished just before you come home.

    You mean, like my 15 yo oven that I can program to turn on at a certain time and a certain degree ?

    Technological progress will never stop to amaze me :face_palm:


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @coldandtired said in Internet of shit:

    Generally it's so you can fill it in the morning and have it turn on so it's finished just before you come home

    Which works as long as everything you're cooking needs the same amount of time at the same temperature and won't go bad if left at room temperature all day



  • @sloosecannon said in Internet of shit:

    The only possible use I could see with that is some kind of reminder...

    I could see plenty of interesting things to do with this, but none of them for the actual owners...


  • Impossible Mission - B

    @sloosecannon said in Internet of shit:

    @bb36e said in Internet of shit:

    0_1492706455066_upload-5949220f-a4eb-44b9-8a9e-30116b45dda6

    remotely turn on/off...and adjust temperature or time on your oven

    :scream:

    The only possible use I could see with that is some kind of reminder... "You left the stove on, dufus".

    That could actually be useful...

    I remember this one time back when I was in 5th grade where something like that might have come in handy.

    We had a pretty simple procedure on Sunday mornings. Part of it was preparing a big pot of soup: the parents would put all the ingredients in the pot, turn it on High to get it boiling, and then turn it back down to Low before we left for church to keep it warm, so that when we got home, there would be a nice warm pot of soup waiting.

    Guess which step they forgot this one time?

    We arrived home to black smoke pouring out one of the windows. Luckily a fire hadn't quite started yet, but the soup pot now contained a massive hunk of charcoal, and it took weeks to get the smoke smell out of the house! Some sort of automated warning from the stove would have been very useful. (Conveniently ignoring the fact that this was well over a decade before the advent of the smartphone or IOT stuff...)



  • @masonwheeler That reminds me when one of my cousin, probably about 15-17 at the time, decided to try cooking one family recipe of soup. It's a relatively complicated one and she was very proud of having done everything correctly. Except she forgot to add water before closing the cooker! The house wasn't empty so it was noticed before it got the same state as yours, but years (decades?) later it's still a joke in the family...


  • Impossible Mission - B

    @remi Not quite as (potentially) catastrophic, but one time my little sister, when she was about 9 years old, wanted to make some peanut butter cookies. Mom was going out for a while, but it was a pretty simple recipe, so she showed her where everything was and left.

    When they came out of the oven, though, there weren't peanut butter cookies on the cookie tray; there was a thin, smooth sheet of peanut-buttery blob substance. My sister had no idea what went wrong, because she did exactly what the recipe said!

    When Mom got home, she looked at it and said, "looks like you forgot the flour." Sister shook her head and pointed to the recipe. "Nope, I did exactly what it says in here: I put in one one-quarter cup of flour!"



  • @masonwheeler What's the punchline?


  • Impossible Mission - B

    @gwowen 11/4 cups of flour.



  • @masonwheeler said in Internet of shit:

    @gwowen 11/4 cups of flour.

    1 + 1/4 vs 1 * 1/4 ???


  • Impossible Mission - B

    @cabrito The recipe called for one-and-one-quarter cups of flour. My sister, not having studied compound fractions in school yet, read it as one single one-quarter cup of flour, and so put in 1/5 as much as the recipe called for.


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @masonwheeler said in Internet of shit:

    @sloosecannon said in Internet of shit:

    @bb36e said in Internet of shit:

    0_1492706455066_upload-5949220f-a4eb-44b9-8a9e-30116b45dda6

    remotely turn on/off...and adjust temperature or time on your oven

    :scream:

    The only possible use I could see with that is some kind of reminder... "You left the stove on, dufus".

    That could actually be useful...

    I remember this one time back when I was in 5th grade where something like that might have come in handy.

    We had a pretty simple procedure on Sunday mornings. Part of it was preparing a big pot of soup: the parents would put all the ingredients in the pot, turn it on High to get it boiling, and then turn it back down to Low before we left for church to keep it warm, so that when we got home, there would be a nice warm pot of soup waiting.

    Guess which step they forgot this one time?

    We arrived home to black smoke pouring out one of the windows. Luckily a fire hadn't quite started yet, but the soup pot now contained a massive hunk of charcoal, and it took weeks to get the smoke smell out of the house! Some sort of automated warning from the stove would have been very useful. (Conveniently ignoring the fact that this was well over a decade before the advent of the smartphone or IOT stuff...)

    Back in the day I would make iced tea by boiling a small pot of water with some sugar in it and then shutting off the heat and adding the tea bags. At the time, I had two cats. One was appropriately named "Spaz", because she was very nervous and excitable. One day I start the water and decide to go watch TV for a few minutes while the water came to a boil. Apparently whatever was on was interesting, because I forgot all about the water + sugar on the stove.

    Spaz comes screeching in to the living room, stops on a dime as soon as she sees me and starts excitedly meowing with a terrified look in her eyes and looking in towards the kitchen. She is freaked the hell out. I had no idea what was wrong...until smoke starts billowing in through the doorway. Thick, grayish-black smoke. The kitchen is completely full of smoke. The dining room is filling fast. I thought the whole kitchen was on fire. I run out the front door and around to the side door that went in to the kitchen. There is a fire extinguisher in a cabinet right by the door which I grab on my way in, hold my breath and start opening windows and clearing the smoke out.

    Luckily, no fire. But the pot was ruined. It was a cheaper disc-bottom pan with a thick disc of metal laminated to the bottom for heat spreading. It had gotten so hot that it completely delaminated. Or perhaps it delaminated when I threw the pan in the sink and started running water over it. Either way, it was completely hosed and after it cooled I got to see the carbon burned in to the interior. It was kind of pretty, like foamy black glass.

    Spaz, being a spaz, gave me a funny look every time after that when she would see me cooking and the tick tick tick of the igniter on the gas range would always make her hunker down and worry. That cat never forgot anything.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @masonwheeler said in Internet of shit:

    The recipe called for one-and-one-quarter cups of flour

    Including that in the anecdote might have helped TBH


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