What is the sound of one hand ClapPasswordg?



  • PIN (Personal Identification Number) is an acronym that is mainly used only in the USA.  Other countries tend to call it a password, or a security code, etc.

    When "localizing" a document for foreign customers, one of our Product Managers decided to replace the word "PIN" with "Password".  Preferred mechanism for doing so? "Find and replace" of course! 

    Case-sensitive? Whole word only? Step through each change before making it? Hell no!  "Replace all!"

    So all of a sudden the section talking about "mapping documents" is talking about "mapPasswordg documents".

    Run spell-check before sending the document to a customer?  Of course not. 



  • Did he get to personally explain the changes to whoever it was sent to?



  • Sounds like you've got some housekeePasswordg to do.



  • For the record, in Canada (aka America Junior), we also tend to say "PIN". Actually, we REALLY prefer to say "PIN Number, eh?"



  • Fidelity uses the term "PIN" to mean "Authentication could which can contain letters and numbers".  On the phone I asked them WTF the 'N' in PIN stood for.  I got a regurgitated description of what the "PIN" could contain.



  • @wk633 said:

    Fidelity uses the term "PIN" to mean "Authentication could which can contain letters and numbers".  On the phone I asked them WTF the 'N' in PIN stood for.  I got a regurgitated description of what the "PIN" could contain.

    Well, we could consider it a base 36 number.....
     



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    PIN (Personal Identification Number) is an acronym that is mainly used only in the USA.  Other countries tend to call it a password, or a security code, etc.

    Here in Austria (native language: German), we use the word "PIN", too. A PIN - as we understand it - is typically a 4-digit numerical code, used for ATMs, cell phones etc.



  • I think of the "PIN" as being the 4-digit code for bank-related things as well (which is a WTF.. only 4 numerals to access a bank account). I use my debit card extensively and <sarcasm>I really love it when the scanner asks me to enter my "secret code"</sarcasm>. It sounds like some exclusive club thing or a BDSM safety word.

    I think "security code" covers it well. "Password" doesn't work because most people don't use "words" in it, but it's obviously the most prolific label for the security code.

    Back to topic.. what do you expect from a "Product Manager"? Our "Project Manager" is a glorified secretary. He manages some calendars, makes phone calls and basically asks "Are you done yet?!" to people who have to produce something for a project nearing its deadline.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    <off-topic-rant>I hate hearing "PIN Number" and "ATM Machine."  Personal Identification Number Number?  Automated Teller Machine Machine?  I think it's a little redundant redundant.</off-topic-rant>



  • In this part of the world (very far from you) we use PIN, but the only use I see is SIM cards and ATMs.

    So I don't see what he is exactly localizing.



  • @joe.edwards@imaginuity.com said:

    <off-topic-rant>I hate hearing "PIN Number" and "ATM Machine."  Personal Identification Number Number?  Automated Teller Machine Machine?  I think it's a little redundant redundant.</off-topic-rant>

     
     



  • My favorite example of this sort of thing is the numerous people who attempted to change the color scheme of their web site with a global search and replace, as demonstrated by these three Google searches:

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=consideblue
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=consideyellow
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=consideblack 

    (Naturally, in each case, the color being replaced was red.) 



  • This remembers me of http://csu.colstate.edu/webdevelop/streamingmedia/ .

    "designed to deteWMVine the speed of the connection ..."

     "Recording the media can be accomplished with noWMVal audio ..."



  • Woah, I'm astonished!

    Just the idea of a global "replace all" gives me the creeps, I'd rather doing it by hand.



  • @AbbydonKrafts said:

    I think of the "PIN" as being the 4-digit code for bank-related things as well (which is a WTF.. only 4 numerals to access a bank account). I use my debit card extensively and <sarcasm>I really love it when the scanner asks me to enter my "secret code"</sarcasm>. It sounds like some exclusive club thing or a BDSM safety word.

    I think "security code" covers it well. "Password" doesn't work because most people don't use "words" in it, but it's obviously the most prolific label for the security code.

    Back to topic.. what do you expect from a "Product Manager"? Our "Project Manager" is a glorified secretary. He manages some calendars, makes phone calls and basically asks "Are you done yet?!" to people who have to produce something for a project nearing its deadline.

     

    Lots of managers work hard and have a lot of responsibility. 



  • (EDIT: Saying things I shouldn't.....)



  • @codeman38 said:

    My favorite example of this sort of thing is the numerous people who attempted to change the color scheme of their web site with a global search and replace, as demonstrated by these three Google searches:

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=consideblue
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=consideyellow
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=consideblack 

    (Naturally, in each case, the color being replaced was red.) 

    That is hilarious!



  • @wgh said:

    @codeman38 said:

    My favorite example of this sort of thing is the numerous people who attempted to change the color scheme of their web site with a global search and replace, as demonstrated by these three Google searches:

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=consideblue
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=consideyellow
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=consideblack 

    (Naturally, in each case, the color being replaced was red.) 

    That is hilarious!



    WTF - Has noone heard of CSS?

    It has been said that an infinite number of monkeys at an infinite number of keyboards will eventually recreate the entire works of shakespeare.  Thankfull the internet has proved, with minimal cruelty to monkeys, that this is not the case.

    Bob

    Can't recall where I got that from...



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    PIN (Personal Identification Number) is an acronym that is mainly used only in the USA.  Other countries tend to call it a password, or a security code, etc.

    UK here, PIN for banks and Bluetooth devices. 



  • Maybe those infinite monkeys would recreate shakespeare's play, maybe not, but just think of all the WTFs along the way!

     

    Search and replace is a dark and powerful tool. 



  • in switzerland, most people call it 'PIN code'. personal identification number code..... fascinating 🙂



  • @H3SO5 said:

    This remembers me of http://csu.colstate.edu/webdevelop/streamingmedia/ .

    "designed to deteWMVine the speed of the connection ..."

     "Recording the media can be accomplished with noWMVal audio ..."



    "WMV files are streamable from a RealMedia streaming server." LOL



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    PIN (Personal Identification Number) is an acronym that is mainly used only in the USA.  Other countries tend to call it a password, or a security code, etc.

    ??? which countries exactly? I've seen PIN in every EU country I've been to (>5). I think that people are so ignorant only in the USA. (or you're talking about ~EU & ~USA, but who cares about them 😉 )

    (joke - no offence meant)



  • So as we keep hearing, they say PIN in other countries too.

    What I keep wondering is, why?

    See, in a country like France, you get an abbreviation for the French equivalent phrase. Where an American might say "CP" for "Command Post", the French would use "PC" for "Poste de Commandement". So I would expect the French to use "NIP" for "Numeral Identificazion Personale" (I don't actually speak French, so I just made that up). I'd also expect the Swiss and the Germans and the Belgians and the Czech Republic to have their own abbreviations. So why does everyone just say "PIN"?

     



  • @CDarklock said:

    I'd also expect the Swiss and the Germans and the Belgians and the Czech Republic to have their own abbreviations. So why does everyone just say "PIN"?

    In German, PIN could also be read as abbreviation for "Persönliche Identifikationsnummer".



  • @AbbydonKrafts said:

    I think of the "PIN" as being the 4-digit code for bank-related things as well (which is a WTF.. only 4 numerals to access a bank account)

    Well, it also requires a physical "token" (your debit card).
     



  • In Dutch: "Persoonlijk Identificatie Nummer", but used only for 4-digit codes on debit cards and mobile phones, never as passwords in the generic sense of the word.



  • @CDarklock said:

    So as we keep hearing, they say PIN in other countries too.

    What I keep wondering is, why?

    See, in a country like France, you get an abbreviation for the French equivalent phrase. Where an American might say "CP" for "Command Post", the French would use "PC" for "Poste de Commandement". So I would expect the French to use "NIP" for "Numeral Identificazion Personale" (I don't actually speak French, so I just made that up). I'd also expect the Swiss and the Germans and the Belgians and the Czech Republic to have their own abbreviations. So why does everyone just say "PIN"?

     

     

    Well, regardless of what "Personal Identification Number" translates to in the foreign language, the document as a whole was written in English, so only the English acronym would apply.

    I'm surprised to see so many people saying they use it in their countries.  The customer in question here was in Egypt, but I know one of our UK customers is pretty adamant about calling it a "security code".

    A lot of you saying it's used for your bank account....I work with voicemail, so do you guys use a different term in that sense?



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    Well, regardless of what "Personal Identification Number" translates to in the foreign language, the document as a whole was written in English, so only the English acronym would apply.

    As viraptor said, "I've seen PIN in every EU country I've been to". That's not an English document, and that's what I find odd. Using the English acronym in an English document isn't even odd when you apply it to other countries, because English-speaking people tend to be imperialist bastards who don't know or care about other cultures.



  • @Bob said:

    WTF - Has noone heard of CSS?

    Oh, the funniest part of this is that one of these red-->blue replacements was in a tutorial on CSS.

    [url=http://web.uvic.ca/~bgerth/workshops/cascadingstylesheets/index.htm]...how to significantly [b]blueuce[/b] Web site maintenance using CSS...[/url]

    Also contains the words 'rendeblue', 'appeablue', 'requiblue', and 'blueefine'.



  • So how can that page have "credits" and "centered".  Perhaps they were trying to prove the point?



  • @anonymous2 said:

    In Dutch: "Persoonlijk Identificatie Nummer", but used only for 4-digit codes on debit cards and mobile phones, never as passwords in the generic sense of the word.

    Usually, we say "PIN code", which is as wrong as PIN number -- yet subtly so.



  • Just saw this in some code btw --
     

    // override the foo done in the conbufuctor 

    int foo(char *buf)

    {



  • @reed said:

    Just saw this in some code btw --
     

    // override the foo done in the conbufuctor 

    int foo(char *buf)

    {

    What's the problem? There might be a perfectly legal reason for doing that. 



  • @ammoQ said:

    @reed said:

    Just saw this in some code btw --
     

    // override the foo done in the conbufuctor 

    int foo(char *buf)

    {

    What's the problem? There might be a perfectly legal reason for doing that. 

     How many reasons can you think of to call a constructor a conbufuctor?

    Although, admittedly, the second one sounds dirtier.



  • @ammoQ said:

    @reed said:

    Just saw this in some code btw --
     

    // override the foo done in the conbufuctor 

    int foo(char *buf)

    {

    What's the problem? There might be a perfectly legal reason for doing that. 

    What, the haphazard replacement of "str" with "buf"?  Find and replace again me thinks.  Although I find it more likely, this example was typoed and it was meant to be "// override the foo done in the conbufor" - as I don't recall "str" being a valid C++ identifier but I know struct is.



  • I, for one, find the word "conbufuctor" absolutely hilarious.

    I would have posted sooner, but I was laughing too hard.



  • Google shows 1 result for conbufuctor



  • @CDarklock said:

    I'd also expect the Swiss and the Germans and the Belgians and the Czech Republic to have their own abbreviations. So why does everyone just say "PIN"?

    Because English is the new lingua franca. Tee hee. Actually, that should be "American", but never mind...

     



  • @codeman38 said:

    @Bob said:

    WTF - Has noone heard of CSS?

    Oh, the funniest part of this is that one of these red-->blue replacements was in a tutorial on CSS.

     Oh yes, and this amusing construct totally floored me:

     

    <h1><font color="#FF0000" class="blue">A level-one heading in blue</font></h1>
     


     



  • Mad libs! 

    What is the sound of one hand Clap________(noun)g?



  • @dhromed said:

    @anonymous2 said:

    In Dutch: "Persoonlijk Identificatie Nummer", but used only for 4-digit codes on debit cards and mobile phones, never as passwords in the generic sense of the word.

    Usually, we say "PIN code", which is as wrong as PIN number -- yet subtly so.

    Here in Australia (The arse end of the world) PIN stands for "Pleasant If Naughty" and everyone uses 8008 (or 80085 if allowed 5 digits). AFAIK, it is the only country in the world where saying PIN number isn't a redundant tautology.

    Like in Holland, noone uses PIN to describe alphanumeric passwords but, as with our PIN numbers, everyone in Australia uses the same password: ******** 



  • @Some Idiot said:

    Like in Holland, noone uses PIN to describe alphanumeric passwords

    Except for phone login numbers, which feels odd because "PIN" was the exclusive domain of ATMs. When my phone dies from malnutrition, it asks for my "PIN".



  • @Kyanar said:

    What, the haphazard replacement of "str" with "buf"?  Find and replace again me thinks.  Although I find it more likely, this example was typoed and it was meant to be "// override the foo done in the conbufor" - as I don't recall "str" being a valid C++ identifier but I know struct is.


    I think the function was initially "int foo(char *str)" and someone wanted to change the parameter's name to buf, and did a replace, changing constructor to conbufuctor.

    Being perpetually 12 years old, I find conbufuctor to be an inherently funny word.


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