Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article)



  • https://notehub.org/klz3i


    Guy who is way deeper into the "unix way" than reasonable rants about Steam client for Linux. Compares it to the way console games are often ported to PC.

    Steam for Linux feels like a windows application outside of its natural habitat. It takes advantage of none of the things Linux has over Windows, and it simply drops support for any of the advantages Windows has over Linux giving nothing to replace it. You can effectively approach Steam for Linux as the equivalent of a console game coming to Windows that:

    • is locked at 30 FPS where 60 FPS is the norm (32 bit)
      for some reason does not work with you deluxe gaming mouse (fights with you window manager)
    • looks and feels like a console application that asks you to "press start" to continue at startup while you try to figure out what random key they choose to map "start" to (does not respect your toolkit and global hotkey configuration)
    • blocks and then ignores your alt-tab (blocks and ignores SIGTERM)
    • requires you to insert the DVD every time to play it (bizarre windows-like install strategy that feels out of place on Unix)
    • has next to no options menu where you are acustomed to a great deal of customization to tune the game to your specific needs

    The part where he rants how he can't script Steam client using DBus is where he jumped the shark of 1337 entitlement for me personally. IMO he should be happy someone is even catering to his 1% of user base.


  • BINNED

    The point of Unix is a philosophy of user-centricity

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!


  • area_pol

    No repro

    I use Steam on Linux and never had any problems with the client itself, it is surprisingly well done and in no way inferior to the Windows version.

    I like the fact it looks and works the same across platforms, because I just need to learn once how to use it.

    There is a CLI/scripting interface if someone needs it: SteamCMD, he just did not bother to look for it.

    IPC / non-graphical interaction are not a justified development effort in a program made specifically for managing games, which are inherently graphical.

    In conclusion, there are many bad Linux programs, but Steam is not one of them.



    1. Steam for Linux possibly fights with your window manager
      There is no reason to do this ever, in fact, for an application like Steam there is no reason to even build in any special code to control its placement

    Fair enough, if they're really including code to do something that's unnecessary and unhelpful, that sucks.

    2. Steam for Linux doesn't use a toolkit
    4. Steam for Linux has an interface that is out of place.

    Same on Windows. Steam is just special like that.

    1. Steam for Linux ignores signals

    OK, unnecessary and unhelpful code again, but the worst consequence seems to be a 1 second delay on shutdown, so whatever.

    1. Steam for Linux ignores common command line options

    That's a feature. Fuck you and your command lines.

    1. Steam for Linux' install strategy is silly
      tl;dr: the traditional placement of installed program files on Unix is very complicated for very good reasons. Steam breaks this and installs things in a simple single folder the Windows way

    FUCK YOU. I say this from the bottom of my heart. Of all the stupid things Linux has ever done, that filesystem structure is by far the worst one.

    6. Steam for Linux is 32 bit
    8. Steam for Linux implements no form of Unix IPC
    9. Steam for Linux does many things, not so well.
    10. Steam for Linux is not open source

    Oh noes!

    Look, as I was saying on the other thread about native GUI toolkits, if your OS has <1% of user share you're in no position to make demands to developers. Much less when your demands are about supporting your special snowflake window manager that someone wrote in LISP in 1983 and has less than 10 users worldwide, or your outdated philosophy from 1978. Deal with it.



  • @anonymous234 +:100:

    I'm no fan of Steam's special snowflake need to override the window manager on every OS, but honestly it's already limited to 32bit on Windows too, so why isn't this guy complaining about how it doesn't cater to entitled Windows users as well? Might as well complain that it doesn't use MSI or integrate with Windows Update.



  • dude complains that an operating system that primarily serves as a tool to develop itself, is unusable as soon as you try to use it to actually do something besides using that system to develop itself.

    ...okay, why not.



  • Steam on the Mac isn't massively different. I am surprised at the number of games in my library that have a decent port. However if I fire up Ubuntu on my old desktop, nothing apart from Half Life and a few india titles work correctly.


  • Banned

    @sh_code said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    primarily serves as a tool to develop itself

    Lier.



  • I move windows by holding down caps+MMB and resize with caps+ctrl+MMB. 
    

    Wat.



  • @cartman82 said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    blocks and then ignores your alt-tab (blocks and ignores SIGTERM)

    WHY IS ALT TAB SENDING THE KILL COMMAND?


  • BINNED

    @ben_lubar how else are you going to switch when running a full screen game?



  • @aapis said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    I move windows by holding down caps+MMB and resize with caps+ctrl+MMB. 
    

    Wat.

    That guy is the one who wants spacebar heating.


  • sockdevs

    @ben_lubar said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    @cartman82 said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    blocks and then ignores your alt-tab (blocks and ignores SIGTERM)

    WHY IS ALT TAB SENDING THE KILL COMMAND?

    0_1467647214086_upload-a5bf7f4a-c4be-4476-8b30-9d9d968482bb


  • :belt_onion:


  • Banned

    @ben_lubar said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    @cartman82 said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    blocks and then ignores your alt-tab (blocks and ignores SIGTERM)

    WHY IS ALT TAB SENDING THE KILL COMMAND?

    TAB ascii code is 9, which is the kill signal number. ALT means the key should be interpreted in an alternative way, in that case is to send the ascii code as a signal.


  • :belt_onion:

    @candlejack1 except 9 is SIGKILL, not SIGTERM


  • sockdevs



  • @cartman82 said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    It takes advantage of none of the things Linux has over Windows,

    Like what?

    @cartman82 said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    (fights with you window manager)

    That's because it runs on X11, the dumbest graphics API ever, which also happens to make many things games want to do with mouses impossible. (At least, while also allowing for task-switching and providing some fallback in case the game crashes.)

    @cartman82 said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    requires you to insert the DVD every time to play it (bizarre windows-like install strategy that feels out of place on Unix)

    Huh? What DVD? Is... is he insane?



  • @Adynathos said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    it is surprisingly well done and in no way inferior to the Windows version.

    That doesn't surprise me, as the Windows version is shitty and awful. (Tell me, in Linux, can you change the font size in IM windows? Steam broke that about 2011 or so when they switched to browser-based rendering, and to-date have still not fixed it.)



  • @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    (At least, while also allowing for task-switching and providing some fallback in case the game crashes.)

    You'd think that. Unfortunately you can set things up so you are the only process receiving keyboard and mouse events, including whatever hotkeys are supposed to switch tasks.

    That was a bug we had some fun with when using the Qt Creator IDE. They have one input field somewhere that grabs all mouse and keyboard events exclusively, so this makes everything except that one-line text input unresponsive until you figure out where you need to hover your mouse cursor so pressing ESC does something.



  • @anonymous234 said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    Fair enough, if they're really including code to do something that's unnecessary and unhelpful, that sucks.

    On Windows, all it does it implement "window snapping" so when your window is close to the edge of a screen, it'll snap tight against it. But in Windows, you can do that without causing any bugs or issues, generally. (Microsoft's own Skype does it, for example.)

    @anonymous234 said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    Oh noes!

    I'd like to see him explain what benefit Steam would derive from being 64-bit. Like... if Steam's using more than 4 GB of memory, something's pretty drastically wrong with it.



  • @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    I'd like to see him explain what benefit Steam would derive from being 64-bit.

    I'm pretty sure the library it injects into processes to make the Steam overlay work is available in both 32 and 64 bit.



  • @witchdoctor said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    You'd think that. Unfortunately you can set things up so you are the only process receiving keyboard and mouse events, including whatever hotkeys are supposed to switch tasks.

    ... I think you missed my point entirely.

    Video games want to have full access to the mouse, basically read its movement data directly without necessarily moving any cursors on any monitors. Windows makes that relatively easy.

    My understanding (and this is out-of-date, but since I don't think X11 ever actually improves at all...) is that this is impossible in X11. You can, however, have your application take control of the mouse, then have it query the mouse position, then re-center, then query, etc. to get the mouse position data. But:

    1. It requires spazzing the cursor around like a moron (hopefully it's not visible!), because you can't read the mouse data without moving the cursor and
    2. You can't get the mouse data without the OS' acceleration figures applied (you still can't get the raw mouse data, only the post-processing mouse data), and
    3. If your application crashes, X11 doesn't release mouse control back to the system, meaning the mouse doesn't work from that point onwards.

    @witchdoctor said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    They have one input field somewhere that grabs all mouse and keyboard events exclusively, so this makes everything except that one-line text input unresponsive until you figure out where you need to hover your mouse cursor so pressing ESC does something.

    That's exactly the kind of thing I'm talking about. WTF X11. I know you're old and creaky, but were you also designed by idiots?



  • @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    You can, however, have your application take control of the mouse, then have it query the mouse position, then re-center, then query, etc. to get the mouse position data.

    Yeah, some games on Windows do this in windowed mode and it's the most broken thing ever. If they don't limit the cursor bounding boxes then you can accidentally click outside the window when turning and clicking in the game.



  • @LB_ The kind of game Lowtax pulls from YoyoGames.com. I've never seen a genuine game, not even one of my shitty 10-for-$3 indies, that makes this mistake.



  • The tl;dr for the entire article is that Steam for Linux has a shoddy port.

    I see his writing is as good as his criticism.

    Yes, Steam for Linux has a shoddy port. It probably has hundreds, given what a third-class citizen Linux is in the gaming wor-- oh you meant is a shoddy port? Well, you're a shoddy proofreader, Mr. ... wait. This isn't signed or dated. WTF? Who the fuck even wrote this?

    I like how even his number one most important issue is weasel-worded IN THE TITLE:

    Steam for Linux possibly fights with your window manager

    Possibly it does. Possibly it doesn't. It might, is what I'm saying. Maybe. Could theoretically happen. So... Steam's terrible! QED.

    This is essential on Unix because there are many different UI's and UI paradigms around. For instance a friend of mine has a setup where one window at all times has "focus" and is enlarged to fill almost the entire screen, the unfocussed windows sit at the left as small thumbnails, only 50-by-50 pixels so he can easily select which window has focus, if need be, he can split the screen easily between two windows which have focus.

    So... Windows 8? (The taskbar has thumbnails, you can maximize a window to keep it focused at all times, and you can use AeroSnap to do half-maximized windows on the monitor.)

    Valve justifies this with "We don't support your window manager at this moment". This is ridiculous and unacceptable, especially because what they did here costs them more effort than just not including any code for window placement and letting the WM figure it out.

    Considering their codebase is a nightmare of Chromium-backed bullshit, this may not even be true. I actually sympathize with this point: it sucks when programs actually expend effort to break something, but it's just as likely that the thing here was broken in Chromium before Valve even got hold of it.

    In any case, "we don't support your special snowflake window manager" is a perfectly reasonable statement.

    The analogy I like to use to illustrate this is a console game which hardcodes mouse drivers into itself directly rather than relying on the OS abstraction and when your mouse or keyboard don't work with it they say "We don't support your mouse, only this list here" No, that's stupid, rely on the OS abstraction layer.

    First of all, this isn't a sentence (or is perhaps like 3 sentences glommed together without enough punctuation?), second of all... huh?

    I guess the PS3 had mouse support? Is that what he's on about? But... wouldn't it just be using the USB input device generic driver? I just... huh? Have any other consoles even had mouse support at all? Is his experience here a common one that maybe I'm just stumped about because I didn't own a PS3?

    The analogy is more confusing than the thing he's trying to make simple.

    Hardcoding controller support might work fine on consoles because everyone has the same controller, but it doesn't on PC.

    But but but your analogy was about consoles! Am I crazy or is he!?

    resizing and moving steam via the normal window manager methods is a disaster, however resizing it and moving it via steam itself goes fine here.

    Steam on Linux has its own non-OS widgetsd to resize and move the window? Is that what he's talking about?

    My response to basically every thing he types is intense confusion.

    If I close one steam Window via the normal window manager ways, Steam closes itself. This is annoying because my reflex when I see an ad pop up is to hold caps+x3 down for longer than 250 ms which ordinarily closes a window, in this case I have to restart Steam

    Caps+X? ... uh ok. Caps is not a modifier. Maybe he has it re-mapped to Control and doesn't realize?

    Steam's window does not show up normally in my Window Manager's window list if I elect to display the window titles, if I elect to dispay the window classes it does show up, but this means that sometimes two different windows show up as Steam who share the Steam class and I have no idea which is the main one.

    What even is a "window class"? Like... the C++ class that drew it? Or...?



  • @blakeyrat
    I can't remember what game it was, but I've definitely seen the mouse affecting windows other than the game, and it wasn't "one of [your] shitty 10-for-$3 indies."


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    I've never seen a genuine game, not even one of my shitty 10-for-$3 indies, that makes this mistake.

    Including GTA V? Cause it's done that to me before.

    It's definitely not intended behavior, and it only happens rarely, but it definitely happens...


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    Caps+X? ... uh ok. Caps is not a modifier. Maybe he has it re-mapped to Control and doesn't realize?

    It can be, that's configurable on most Linux WMs



  • @blakeyrat Wow I don't want to mega-spam up this thread, but this is amazing. His best example for what "native look and feel" should be is a bittorrent client, pictured mid-piracy and a partition manager(!).

    0_1467651286630_qp7lN1F.jpg

    And yes, you can tell the difference between Steam and the stuff in his OS theme because you can read the text Steam draws. It's not font size 7, super-narrow, grey-on-black text.

    And just now while typing this I noticed he also has a console or maybe notepad app open with a Deep Space 9 quote.

    But he knows at a MILLISECOND'S NOTICE how much disk space he has free! That's important, people!

    I for instance can't remember the last time I double clicked4 on anything and probably never did on Unix.

    Is this true? Linux doesn't use double-click? How does this guy distinguish between selecting a thing and activating a thing? (Of course I've used Linux a ton and I know it's bullshit, but it's so crazy I demand an explanation.)



  • @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    I'd like to see him explain what benefit Steam would derive from being 64-bit. Like... if Steam's using more than 4 GB of memory, something's pretty drastically wrong with it.

    He had to install 32bit libraries on his pristine system. It's a tragedy for the ages.


  • BINNED

    @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    How does this guy distinguish between selecting a thing and activating a thing?

    He also claims not to have touched his mouse in 2 hours, so it's likely he rarely single clicks either



  • Some of the drop-down menus activate when you hover over them, I have never seen this in Unix, menus don't drop down when you hover, you have to click

    That's actually a Mac Classic thing, believe it or not. No clue why Steam does that. I kind of like it, but I would, so.

    weird help popups in general show if you hover over things with your mouse. This is a Windows-ism that is mostly considered annoying,

    They're called tooltips, and I need a cite on "considered annoying". By whom? You and... your cat? Bullshit.

    the general design sensibility is that a cursor shouldn't do anything by just being at some place and stuff should be clicked before an action is taken, otherwise the cursor just becomes annoying and has to be put to the side all the time.

    He's actually... kind of right here. But that doesn't mean tooltips are a bad idea.

    it's annoying if it can accidentally do stuff if it's in the middle of it.

    So just don't put your hand on it and move it you fucking idiot. You just said a paragraph ago you've gone "two hours without touching the mouse". So why do you care?

    Oh-- let me guess-- your shitty Fluxbox UI had a bug where if UI elements scroll in UNDER the mouse, it fires a mouseover event which causes the tooltip to show, right? Is that it? I'm using my Raymond Chen "psychic debugging" to determine why your buggy-ass shitty software might be causing this complaint. In a OS that works correctly, mouseover events only occur when the cursor moves.

    The scrollbar works weirdly in that clicking outside of the bar scrolls to a position which is counter-intuitive to where it should scroll to on Unix, basically it goes way too far.

    If you click outside the bar, it scrolls one window heights' worth. Like always. Since 1984. This is well-established. Sorry your Linux is broken, I guess?

    Drop-down menus automatically collapse when your mouse moves outside of their boundaries.

    Yeah, well, they're using the Mac Classic rules, so that'll happen.

    1. Steam for Linux ignores common command line options

    Well duh, it's not a CLI program. It also doesn't have a brake pedal. That's because it's not a car.


  • Banned

    @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    They're called tooltips, and I need a cite on "considered annoying". By whom? You and... your cat? Bullshit.

    there are shitty UIs where an ubhelpful tooltip will pop up over whatever you want to read. google translated pages are one



  • @candlejack1 Well, since Google has the UX ability of a particularly stupid walrus, that does not surprise me. That also doesn't make the concept of tooltips bad in any way.



  • 32 bit is old, outdated, for some reason many Windows applications still use 32 bit.

    Old, ok. Outdated? Uh. No.

    And many Windows applications still use 32-bit because:

    1. They wouldn't benefit from switching to 64-bit
    2. Windows isn't a broken piece of shit like your Linux undoubtedly is and runs 32-bit apps the same way it always has
    3. They'd have to retest literally every byte of code to ensure the application worked the same in 64-bit. Since nobody in the Linux world ever tests anything, it's not a concern for them.

    Oh and BTW, Audacity, one of the "headlining" open source apps for audio editing, which would greatly benefit from being 64-bit? It's not. GASP! It also would benefit greatly from being threaded, and it's not that, either. Basically it's shit. And the only reason anybody uses it for anything is because SoundForge costs like $90.



  • @blakeyrat Ah, he's one of those people.

    People absolutely obsessed with customizing every single aspect of their desktop, making the interface as cryptic and far from plebs' desktops as possible (some will literally consider you a lesser human being if you have the default desktop background or if you use icons on your desktop), making everything DARK LIKE MY SOUL, putting useless graphs and numbers everywhere so it looks like a computer from a Hollywood movie. It takes many hours of work reading man pages and editing config files.

    His setup really wins a prize though, that text is completely unreadable.



  • @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    But that doesn't mean tooltips are a bad idea.

    I miss the "?" button.

    0_1467652317973_upload-12ac1926-f892-4152-b856-75911c6bd74d

    @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    His best example for what "native look and feel"

    Jesus Christ, this screenshot pretty much invalidates everything this guy has to say about usability. Okay, I get it, red on black is edgy and cool if ugly, but how the fuck is he able to read that torrent list without his eyeballs popping out?



  • In retrospect, I realize this article is about as perfect blakey-bait as it can get.



  • @Maciejasjmj said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    I miss the "?" button.

    I was about to say F1 still works, but we're talking about Steam and it doesn't in Steam, haha. Well, F1 still works in most apps.



  • @cartman82 Pretty much. I keep saying I'm going to finish reading it and not comment on anything else, but I can't. This is amazing.



  • @Maciejasjmj said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    I miss the "?" button.

    Yeah. That was actually a neat idea.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @cartman82 said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    In retrospect, I realize this article is about as perfect blakey-bait as it can get.

    I realized that as soon as you posted it. I had my :popcorn: ready.


  • Banned

    @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    And the only reason anybody uses it for anything is because SoundForge costs like $90.

    TIL by spending a lot of money we can get better stuff



  • For example:

    How Steam on Linux is installed is inane. How it works is that the actual package you actually install is a launcher which when ran will then proceed to fully install all program data in your home directory the first time you run it. That's 1.3 GB for me.

    What Steam's doing here is clearly wrong, but why do you think they're doing it that way? They don't on Windows, multi-user support works fine in our OS.

    So maybe instead of yelling at Steam for doing it wrong on Linux, figure out why they did it that way, and fix the problem. (My guess: lack of automatic UAC elevation makes it impossible for their installer to write in the correct location.)

    It's the part of programs that can be shared between multiple users, as such it should be shared between multiple users and it typically goes in the root directory which is shared between all users, not the home directory which belongs to only one user.

    The root directory? I barely know Linux, and I know that's not true.

    Unix is traditionally built upon the idea, unlike Windows, that file paths of data actually aren't that relevant.

    Bullshit. Both Unix and Windows refer to file by path all the fucking time.

    In any case, how is this relevant to Steam at all?

    On Windows when you install software you typically choose where to, on Unix, you really don't, you let the installer figure that out and it doesn't matter, in fact, software has a tendency to stop working if you move it.

    Linux is so great, software breaks if you move it! But unlike Windows, it's not obsessed with file paths. It just breaks the software when you change the path. Because it doesn't care about paths. THIS MAKES SENSE TO MY BRAIN.



  • applications on Unix do not try to control their own look and feel as to not break your desktop

    They don’t need to do that in order to look out of place. Different GUI toolkits FTW.



  • If I want to write a script that automatically starts Steam downloads at sleeping hours and stops them again when I wake up

    Yeah.

    0_1467653544725_upload-acf55fd5-a9f7-414e-8c35-75492c7574cb

    Steam can't do that at all.

    My cat kept shutting my computer down by pressing the off button so so I made a simple script which ensured that the off button only works if there has been keyboard activity within the last 10 seconds but not as the button is being pressed to avoid that.

    No comment.

    Unlike in Windows "many features" is not seen as a good thing but as a bad thing. It should focus on a small set of features and implement them properly. And if you want other features, well, then you get another application for that? And yes, this all works together seamlessly because of the aforementioned Unix IPC that allows programs to communicate with each other. This means that you have choice and can pick whatever you want.

    I find it really difficult to believe that Linux has a scripting layer that would allow you to do something like this:

    You should really just be able to get your own chat client and if possible link it up to Steam via IPC.

    Someone correct me if idiot here is right.

    Towards the end he just kind of went nuts and started just slamming down keys:

    doing this wss for Steam

    Are they afraid peope wil pirate the Steam client?

    Ah, that Peope Wil, my nemesis!

    what is commonly called "Linux" is in fact a gratis and open sour clone of the original Unix OS from the 1970's.

    "Open sour", I have a new catch phrase.

    as such the term "Unix" in this article is used to refer to the various modifications and re-implementations of the original AT&T Unix® around today.

    Right; but Linux isn't one of those. Nothing in Linux came from Unix. So ignoring the trademark issue, you used the wrong term this entire article.

    Linux™ is only a re-implementation of the Unix® Kernel which is a part of an operating system.

    He put in the trademark symbol but forgot to spellcheck "wss".

    This term is inaccurate and causes confusion as well as in the eyes of many people improperly disrespectful the GNU project and its ideals which actually contributed significantly more to most "Linux" operating systems than the Linux project has.

    Oh one of these guys.

    Yeah. Linus build a whole OS kernal from scratch. But he contributed less to the holistic OS experience than some idiot in a dorm room eating his own foot fungus and writing a CLI program that does nothing but return true.

    EDIT: wait a minute, he's one of the GNU people (where GNU stands for "GNU is not Unix") and he still thinks that Linux is a Unix? Dude. The group you give hand jobs to every other day says it's not a Unix. Stallman is gonna come over and kick your ass. Probably using his BO as a weapon.

    As a bit of trivia it was originally developed on the NeXTSTEP Unix variant which is actually the ancestor of Mac OS X which while retaining the user interface sensibilities of Mac OS 9 at its operational core is fundamentally a form of Unix and has much in common with Linux if you look under the hood.

    If I stop to type commas and periods I'll lose my inertia keep typing keep typing

    And for the record, OS X retains virtually none of the "user interface sensibilities" of OS 9, if it did I'd probably still be using it myself.

    All your music and data and documents nad work gone basically.

    All my nad work, gone!


  • area_pol

    @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    (fights with you window manager)
    That's because it runs on X11

    The problem is his special window manager, not X11. For me (on Cinnamon) Steam cooperates well - it works with ALT+TAB and with [start menu key] + arrow which snaps window to half of screen. When you close the window, it stays on the notification bar.
    It hard to find a difference between Steam clients of different platforms.
    Also, I do not think I ever had a problem with the mouse input/restriction in games.

    In general, he likes to customize things but Steam does not offer the options to do so, because that is not a useful feature for that kind of program.
    One could say that this extensive customization/specialization, like special window managers or learning vim, is increasing their work efficiency. However, it also creates a weakness when you need to use new tools or someone else's computer - then you would suffer from the the lack of the special customizations

    @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    Tell me, in Linux, can you change the font size in IM windows?

    I can not find any option about fonts.
    But since few programs in general have such options, I did not expect such a feature.



  • @Adynathos said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    One could say that this extensive customization/specialization, like special window managers or learning vim, is increasing their work efficiency.

    We're talking about Steam. The only "work efficiency" in this context is the one lost.



  • @blakeyrat said in Steam for Linux: The Port Report (article):

    My cat kept shutting my computer down by pressing the off button

    I think his cat is smarter than he is and is trying to tell him something.


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