Example username: team00



  • I just remembered an old story from a few years ago when I was in high school. In the computer science club, our coach would have us compete in competitive programming competitions (the kind with a written test and then a free response where you are given multiple problems that you have to write code for and then submit the code to an automated judge). These events were typically hosted by other high schools in their computer labs, and the setups varied from 'we have no idea how to run an event' to 'we only had a couple issues running the event this time'. Oh, and pretty much everyone uses Java, though some events let you pick a different language if you want for the free response section.

    At one of these competitions, the info sheet telling us how to login wasn't personalized per each team - it just had the example username and password - team00 - and said to replace 00 with your team number. (Pretty typical login setup for these events). Well, it just so happened that the team I was on actually was team 0, so we logged in as team00 with password team00.

    So we log in, start working on the dry-run problem and suddenly the IDE blurts out that the file has been changed elsewhere and prompts us to reload it. Doing so shows entirely different code. We start panicking as we have just lost the (insignificant) amount of code we had written and all the while it keeps asking us to reload the changes. Also, files and folders are appearing on the desktop and documents - folders that look like IDE projects...

    As you probably guessed, multiple other teams had misread the instructions and logged in as team 0, and started modifying our files over the network - because apparently this site had network mapped user folders and allowed multiple simultaneous logins of the same user. :facepalm:

    We let the event staff know of the issue and they had to get us a new unused team number and go around and find all the teams that logged in as team 0 to tell them off. It ended up cutting into our time and we never got to submit the dry run to the judge. Oh well, these are just high school kids claiming to be good with computers, what do you expect?

    I don't remember anything else from that event, but I did learn two things: one, don't make the example login details actual login details, and two, high school students who are supposedly programmers can't even read an info sheet properly. I'm not sure how they expected to read the free response problem statements correctly, let alone the questions and answers of the multiple choice written portion.



  • @LB_ said in Example username: team00:

    password team00

    hunter2.txt


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @LB_ said in Example username: team00:

    high school students who are supposedly programmers can't even read an info sheet properly

    Why would they? Nobody else does…



  • Why would you do that?

    Your username is admin and your password is admin if you are the administrator with that password. Otherwise, use your own login details.

    Nobody reads instructions if they can just copy and paste into two text boxes. Why not have all the computers pre-logged-in?


  • Fake News

    This reminds me of Van Halen's infamous "No brown M&M's" clause. They would request a bowl of these little candies and then put a clause in the middle of their contracts that having any brown ones could forfeit the show, all to make sure that people would fully read and understand the technical instructions.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    TIL that having the password hint of Google it! will probably result in would-be hackers going to Google to find my password. Which would be adorable in its own way...

    Also, for kicks and wiggles I'd probably make that login valid, but open fake malware similar to the FBI worm or whatever with loud klaxons and a computer monotoning out Illegal activities detected, the authorities have been notified...



  • This reminds me of all the people who make up fake domains and email addresses to use in documentation. There's already a set of reserved domain names specifically for this purpose: example.com, example.net, etc. Anyone who uses anything else deserves to have their documentation link to porn sites.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Dragnslcr said in Example username: team00:

    Anyone who uses anything else deserves to have their documentation link to porn sites.

    What happens if they're writing documentation for porn sites? Do they end up linking to model railway catalogues?



  • @Tsaukpaetra said in Example username: team00:

    Also, for kicks and wiggles I'd probably make that login valid, but open fake

    That's actually a fun idea. Put a sticky note on your monitor with a password that, when used to login or unlock your machine, loads to a fake locked-down desktop.

    @Dragnslcr said in Example username: team00:

    This reminds me of all the people who make up fake domains and email addresses to use in documentation.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fictional_Microsoft_companies - e.g. the toaster keyboard is Fabrikam brand.



  • @LB_ said in Example username: team00:

    high school students who are supposedly programmers can't even read an info sheet properly.

    To be fair, very few people of any kind ever bother to read instructions.



  • @LB_ said in Example username: team00:

    That's actually a fun idea. Put a sticky note on your monitor with a password that, when used to login or unlock your machine, loads to a fake locked-down desktop.

    What about a login that turns on the webcam and displays its image fullscreen with the caption "a butt"?


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