Main finger turn on!



  • I just got Linux's fingerprint software working on my Gentoo install.  It wasn't that hard (for once), but I've noticed some... odd messages when it triggers on the command line.


    verification start,  put finger 

     

    (sorry for the JPEG, but Picasa wouldn't take the PNG version)



  • Okay, looks like the image broke.  Here's the important part:


    funnyman3595@localhost ~ $ sudo gcc-config i686-pc-linux-gnu-4.1.1

    Verification start

    Put finger

    Image processing

    Scanned good image

    Operation succeeded

     * Switching native-compiler to i686-pc-linux-gnu-4.1.1 ...

     

    The image is here. Hopefully that page will work even though the include doesn't.



  • So, every time you want the computer to do something special for you, you give it "the finger"?



  • Pretty much.  I'm curious, though, as to whether these messages were written by an English native or if the Zero Wing team has been doing open source localization lately...  Every time I see thim, I can't help but think of AYB...



    In /etc/init.d

    Sudo was beginning. 

    Kernel: What happen?

    Gcc: Somebody set up us the root.

    Shell: We get signal. 

    Kernel: What!

    Shell: Main finger turn on.

    Kernel: It's you!!

    PAM: How are you programs!!

    PAM: All your cycle are belong to us.

    PAM: You are on the way to install.

    Kernel: What you say!!

    PAM: You have no chance to configure make your time.

    PAM: Ha ha ha ha....
    Shell: Kernel!!
    Kernel: Take off every 'Gz'!!
    Kernel: You know what you doing.
    Kernel: Move 'Tar'.
    Kernel: For great source.

    Yes, yes that was as bad as you think it was.  Sorry about that.
     



  • Don't you mean "mv tar"?



  • Your subject line is blatant false advertising.
     



  • tmountjr: Ach!  You're right, I missed a good line.  Well, "good" in the sense of...  ah, you know what I mean.

    R.Flowers: ... What?  Look, I won't be held responsible for what went through your dirty mind...



  • So you haven't seen the really awful graphical version... it completely ignores Xinerama (my laptop's 1024x768 screen is great for hauling to class, but not so good for hacking on various projects), so the screenshot doesn't show that this thing is split by 3-4 inches of monitor bezel (hey, the monitors, and the computers they were attached to, were free...)

    Oh, and just a warning... updating that thing is fuuuunnnn.... 

    Edit: included inline image
    screenshot of thinkpad fingerprint sesnsor popup
     



  • @FunnyMan said:

    (sorry for the JPEG, but Picasa wouldn't take the PNG version)

    That, if true, is a WTF unto itself.



  • @thequux said:

    So you haven't seen the really awful graphical version... it completely ignores Xinerama (my laptop's 1024x768 screen is great for hauling to class, but not so good for hacking on various projects), so the screenshot doesn't show that this thing is split by 3-4 inches of monitor bezel (hey, the monitors, and the computers they were attached to, were free...)

    Oh, and just a warning... updating that thing is fuuuunnnn.... 

    Edit: included inline image
    screenshot of thinkpad fingerprint sesnsor popup
     

    Wait... which finger again? 



  • This recalls me a real bad choice I had about one year ago : gentoo on amd64, running on 64bits libraries. Absolute nightmare, don't ever think of making the slightest update without packaging/paths/config errors. Too few people to test, I guess. Anyway : while gentoo's idea is great, it's unpractical ; and second thing : if you really want to use gentoo on a amd64, just do a 32-bit install. you won't even see any performance drawback ...

     



  • aikii: uh, what? I've had a Gentoo/AMD64 in production for just about a year now without any problems. It's a mail/www/fileserver, and it's been working without a hitch (even the braindead we-only-support-redhat-and-yellowdog Trend VirusWall [32-bit] works fine). The machine is an EMT64 Xeon. My home server's been running on amd64 arch since March last year, too.



  • I'm just saying too many packages are broken when compiling in 64 bits. I wouldn't mind the compile time if versions marked "stable" for 64bits weren't so often outdated. Okay, I'll say if you need not so up-to-date versions of standard software, that's not so much a problem.



  • I wanted to add this update but it's too late : You might be skeptical as I don't provide factual examples, but I don't
    update my server too often ( I don't want to loose hours on this again
    ). But I promise to keep you informed next time in run into such
    problems ;-) I understand 'vapor criticism' is quite boring.



  • @aikii said:

    I wanted to add this update but it's too late : You might be skeptical as I don't provide factual examples, but I don't
    update my server too often ( I don't want to loose hours on this again
    ).
    This would be the problem;  you're not using it correctly.

    In a binary distro, letting software get out of date means you have...  old software.  In Gentoo, it's not just applications you've let grow mould, it's all your build tools too, and what's going to build without those?  System updates don't take much time if you let it do them when it wants to(as opposed to software updates, which I generally put off unless I have pressing reasons), but ignore them at your peril.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.