I know there's a push for contactless, but this is ridiculous


  • SockDev

    0_1459587586678_upload-136daefd-9409-44fb-bc80-2007b94ca230

    That's right: on the London Underground, paying by cash can be more than three times the price!

    Want to know what makes it even more ridiculous? That journey is 10 minutes.



  • London is just a ripoff.

    In Sheffield, Tram ticket for the whole day is like 4 quid ...



  • @RaceProUK I've always suspected it was part of a policy of "Cheap for Londoners, less cheap for out-of-towners (with UK bank accounts), extortionate for foreigners who won't have a contactless card that works in the UK"


  • Fake News

    There are shitloads of toll roads in the Miami area. They've also gone exclusively toll-by-plate, unlike most of the rest of the U.S. Thus, if you drive on one of these roads without having registered your plate first, you get a bill in the mail at some point later, but with an extortionate admin fee on top of it. Oh, and the rental car companies get to charge you a "reasonable" fee for using toll-by-plate with one of their cars, which naturally you don't find out until you get there. The alternative of course is to avoid the toll roads, but traffic on local roads there is horrendous.



  • wtfbanking doesnt support it yet, we're gonna wait until we have to implement in a week when a customer ask for it

    why do things with a solid process and planning when you can do a cowboy coding run?


  • area_deu

    Surveillance reasons? 👒



  • @RaceProUK said in I know there's a push for contactless, but this is ridiculous:

    That's right: on the London Underground, paying by cash can be more than three times the price!

    And all this time I've been buying proper tickets every time I go to London like an idiot 😆



  • The toll is quite high for moving around the known universe.



  • @gwowen Here in the Seattle area, our transit card is called Orca, and anybody can pop into a 7-11 and buy one. They have to preload with $10, I think, is the only requirement. So if an out-of-towner doesn't have one, well, that's kind of dumb. Are Oyster cards harder to buy?

    Then again, our transit agencies don't change different fares based on method of payment, because that is also dumb.



  • @gwowen said in I know there's a push for contactless, but this is ridiculous:

    extortionate for foreigners who won't have a contactless card that works in the UK"

    AFAIR Oyster cards aren't personal, you can buy them at convenience stores and such. When I lived there for a while, I simply borrowed one from my landlord with no problem.

    In my hometown, though... no such luck, and of course when they introduced the system they hiked the paper ticket prices up majorly. Then again, cheaper public transport is supposed to be a bonus for leaving your taxes in the city.



  • @blakeyrat said in I know there's a push for contactless, but this is ridiculous:

    Are Oyster cards harder to buy?

    No.

    @blakeyrat said in I know there's a push for contactless, but this is ridiculous:

    our transit agencies don't change different fares based on method of payment

    It's two different types of fare, although the website doesn't make that clear.
    The thing referred to as "Cash" is a traditional paper ticket which can be also be paid using credit/debit card - including contactless - as they're bought from a ticket machine.
    Contactless is listed next to Oyster above because you can just use a contactless credit/debit card on the Oyster card readers without even needing to buy an Oyster card.

    The Oyster system always charges you the cheapest fare from a specific stop to another specific stop. You tap the card as you enter and leave the Underground system.
    The paper tickets are typically zoned - so whether you want to go one stop or seven if it's within the same zone (or group of zones for outer London) it's the same price.
    For example, if we make RacePro's journey another 4 stops longer which crosses another zone, the traditional ticket is the same price but the Oyster journey costs more.

    0_1459612332078_upload-ac7d3e5b-7134-42b7-937c-fc1e9a7fd266

    Yes, the Oyster is cheaper than a traditional ticket, but that's because they want to encourage people to use the easier more modern system.

    TL;DR - it's not a dumb way, they're encouraging people to use the easiest and cheapest system



  • @blakeyrat said in I know there's a push for contactless, but this is ridiculous:

    Then again, our transit agencies don't change different fares based on method of payment, because that is also dumb.

    Don't know how it's done in Seattle, but with our Oyster analogues, you punch them when you enter and leave the bus so that it can charge you based on the exact amount of stops you've traversed. Would be rather hard to do with paper tickets, so those you simply buy for 10 or 30 minutes, or for a single trip.

    So it would be pretty much impossible to charge exactly the same whether you use the card or the paper ticket, since they work differently.



  • @Maciejasjmj said in I know there's a push for contactless, but this is ridiculous:

    Don't know how it's done in Seattle, but with our Oyster analogues, you punch them when you enter and leave the bus so that it can charge you based on the exact amount of stops you've traversed.

    People in Seattle don't punch little cards.

    We only punch Californians.



  • @blakeyrat said in I know there's a push for contactless, but this is ridiculous:

    @gwowen Here in the Seattle area, our transit card is called Orca, and anybody can pop into a 7-11 and buy one. They have to preload with $10, I think, is the only requirement. So if an out-of-towner doesn't have one, well, that's kind of dumb. Are Oyster cards harder to buy?

    Then again, our transit agencies don't change different fares based on method of payment, because that is also dumb.

    The problem with cards like this is that I have got fined £20 each time "for not buying a ticket", when I used the oyster card for the London Underground.

    I obviously did sign in (you can't get on the platform easily unless you are into parkour) and for whatever reason it wasn't recorded properly by the logic the oyster card system runs under. So when I failed to "sign out at the gate" I was fined £20, even though I had the card on me.

    London being London everybody is a rude arsehole and refused to believe anything, even though to pretty much everyone in the UK I sound like a farmer from being from the west country.

    If you get a ticket, you have a receipt that you can show a staff member in such an event and prove you didn't try getting a free ride.

    I always buy tickets now, and I shouldn't be penalised for buying one over something like the oyster card or similar. It is the same journey you are paying for.

    Also if you are a contractor like I it is easier to claim back real tickets, than oyster card expenses because I can easily prove that they were to work and back rather than anywhere else.

    Normally I am all for not having paper work, but you can get fucked because there is a bug in Transport for London's computer system.



  • @Maciejasjmj said in I know there's a push for contactless, but this is ridiculous:

    ...but with our Oyster analogues, you punch them when you enter and leave the bus so that it can charge you based on the exact amount of stops you've traversed.

    Which cities do that?



  • @coldandtired

    London



  • @coldandtired said in I know there's a push for contactless, but this is ridiculous:

    Which cities do that?

    Seattle does for the Sounder commuter train. The Light Rail doesn't (because right now it's all in one "zone"), nor does the Streetcar (ditto).

    Bus drivers charge based on zone, but you have to tell the driver to switch the card reader if the bus typically goes into a different zone, but you're getting off in the same zone. (Before you use your Orca card, they can't retroactively change it after.) For example, on the 510 or 512 route, the card reader will be set to the 2-zone fare, but if you're getting off at, say, South Everett Park & Ride (which is in the same zone as Everett Station), you can ask the driver to change the reader to a 1-zone fare for you.

    If you pay cash in the Seattle zone on Metro, the most common cash routes, they give you a paper transfer slip. SoundTransit doesn't offer transfers because it's designed for commuting in and out, not for travel within the city. The Orca card applies transfers automatically, without a paper slip-- even on SoundTransit, which doesn't otherwise do transfers.

    Every transit system in or near Seattle uses the Orca card, with the exception of the Seattle Monorail which is cash-only. And no, I have absolutely no idea why. So your Orca card works when you're paying hundreds of dollars taking an 18-wheeler onto a car ferry, but not when you're taking your cousin from downtown to the Space Needle for $4. Go fucking figure.

    And by typing this I have now become the guy who wrote this play:

    Agatha Christie Sketch (Railway Timetables) – 03:32
    — Revictus13



  • @coldandtired said in I know there's a push for contactless, but this is ridiculous:

    @Maciejasjmj said in I know there's a push for contactless, but this is ridiculous:

    ...but with our Oyster analogues, you punch them when you enter and leave the bus so that it can charge you based on the exact amount of stops you've traversed.

    Which cities do that?

    Poznań. And I think that's the only one.

    The system is... kinda special, as most public systems in Poland are.



  • @Maciejasjmj said:

    kinda special

    It's Poland ... what did you expect?



  • @blakeyrat

    So it works more or less like London.

    The Barcelona Transit system was the best €4 for the entire day everywhere.


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