Rejected Rejection Letters


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Maciejasjmj Well, it was a private email at first. Of course what he published now sounds incredibly arrogant and elitist, but he certainly wasn't "asserting [his] superiority" in the original email. That doesn't even make sense if there's no audience.



  • @asdf said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    That doesn't even make sense if there's no audience.

    You don't need audience for wankery for it to be wankery. How many times have you heard of someone talking down a cashier or something, calling them an idiot for getting something wrong, just to make themselves feel better? I get the same vibe from this guy, except he got high enough to do that to candidates.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @boomzilla said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    Necro rejection:

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/millennial-savages-me-glass-door-giving-her-feedback-jonathan-pollard

    This is an amazing Glass Door post savaging me as one of the the "rudest and [most] unprofessional hiring managers" a 23 year-old millennial has ever encountered (in her distinguished career):
    ...
    Real talk: There are many wonderful, hard-working, well-adjusted millennials out there. The best lawyers on my team are all millennials. I love them and would trust them with anything. But don't kid yourself: There has been a dramatic generational shift. I graduated from Cornell in 2004. Back then, college was still a sort of rough and tumble place. You know, people had different ideas and might say stuff that offended you. There weren't trigger warnings and safe spaces. If you got a bad grade, then you got a bad grade. You couldn't be all like, "Professor, I demand you change my grade because you didn't take into account how I'm triggered and in personal turmoil over the riots in Baltimore even though I grew up rich in Fairfax, Virginia and have no real, personal connection to that situation but, like, it really is part of my entire being and I'm woke as F but really triggered too. So this C you gave me is really a microaggression. I deserve an A."

    This is not anecdotal. This is not an isolated instance. This is an entire culture that some of you folks out there have created by being helicopter parents; hovering around your kids; never letting them fall off their bikes; insisting that they get trophies for everything even when they lose; arguing with their teachers to get them better grades; coddling them and holding their hand through absolutely everything and never letting them sink or swim on their own. This is the monster that you have created.

    (quote extended)

    This is like the generational version of a "my black friend" + "I'm not racist, but …" combo.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @boomzilla said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    If she ignoresdoesn't ignore his advice like everyone else is probably ignoring her as a job applicant, she perhaps hasmight have a shot at improving and avoiding a career as a bitter and bewildered barista.

    ETFY.



  • @Maciejasjmj said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @boomzilla on the other hand, as an owner (which the guy punctuates so eagerly as if it was the cue for a standing ovation) spending valuable time asserting your superiority over a 23-year-old kid* and going all English teacher on his ass is patronizing at best, and just plain old wankery at worst.

    This "kid" has has 13 years of schooling and 4 or more years of advanced schooling. If they can't write better than that while trying to get a job as a writer, then college failed them. Hard.



  • @Dreikin said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    This is like the generational version of a "my black friend" + "I'm not racist, but …" combo.

    Does it help if the friend says you're not prejudiced?



  • @Dreikin said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    I graduated from Cornell in 2004.

    So this is a guy in his mid-30s bitching about millennials? :wtf:


  • Impossible Mission - B

    @Dragnslcr :pendant:ically, a guy in his mid-30s is a millennial. The generation is generally counted as having begun with babies born in 1982 (who therefore turned 18 in the year 2000). Those people are 35, turning 36, this year.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @masonwheeler said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @Dragnslcr :pendant:ically, a guy in his mid-30s is a millennial. The generation is generally counted as having begun with babies born in 1982 (who therefore turned 18 in the year 2000). Those people are 35, turning 36, this year.

    I think that was @Dragnslcr's point.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @xaade said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @Dreikin said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    This is like the generational version of a "my black friend" + "I'm not racist, but …" combo.

    Does it help if the friend says you're not prejudiced?

    Not really, but it can make it a lot more awkward to challenge.



  • @Dreikin said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @masonwheeler said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @Dragnslcr :pendant:ically, a guy in his mid-30s is a millennial. The generation is generally counted as having begun with babies born in 1982 (who therefore turned 18 in the year 2000). Those people are 35, turning 36, this year.

    I think that was @Dragnslcr's point.

    Pretty much, yeah. Or at least close enough to not have much grounds for complaining. The culture didn't change as much as he seems to be implying in just 10 years. Either he thinks that it did, or he assumes that both his experience 10 years ago and whatever experience he read about on some web site are universal. Either way, he sounds like the kind of boss with a serious enough disconnect from reality that I wouldn't want to work for him.



  • @masonwheeler said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    ically, a guy in his mid-30s is a millennial.

    Fuck you. I'm a Willenial.


    Filed under: I made a ton of money off fixing COBOL systems for Will2K



  • @xaade said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @Maciejasjmj said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @boomzilla on the other hand, as an owner (which the guy punctuates so eagerly as if it was the cue for a standing ovation) spending valuable time asserting your superiority over a 23-year-old kid* and going all English teacher on his ass is patronizing at best, and just plain old wankery at worst.

    This "kid" has has 13 years of schooling and 4 or more years of advanced schooling. If they can't write better than that while trying to get a job as a writer, then college failed them. Hard.

    college failed them

    Strike that; reverse.

    They failed school.



  • I had an interviewer that kept bullshitting me that the some personal that would interview me a second time would be only available next week, and forwarded this like 3 times until I figured it was just a lie.



  • @djls45 said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    Strike that; reverse.

    IF the school passed them, it wasn't just the kid's failure.



  • @xaade said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @djls45 said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    Strike that; reverse.

    IF the school passed them, it wasn't just the kid's failure.

    True point, but if so, it would've also been the fault of the whole education system they were in, not just the college.


  • BINNED

    @masonwheeler said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @Dragnslcr :pendant:ically, a guy in his mid-30s is a millennial. The generation is generally counted as having begun with babies born in 1982 (who therefore turned 18 in the year 2000). Those people are 35, turning 36, this year.

    Millennials as a generation seems to keep stretching. What's the end date for them? It seems to be a much "bigger" generation than X or baby boomers, and is basically "kids these days" as far as I can tell.

    Also, is it the same generation that used to be called Generation Y or is that something else between millennial and X?


  • sockdevs

    @Jaloopa From Wikipedia:
    0_1493370023796_upload-369241ee-4d0f-4efe-a6d0-b9e58eba1ae4


  • sockdevs

    Shocking, a person applying for a writing job writes far more badly than she thinks she does, and someone that effectively would be an editor provides editor feedback. Then wait for the butt hurt.



  • @Arantor said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    and someone that effectively would be an editor

    As in, the owner? I don't think so, unless it's like a three person shop.


  • sockdevs

    @Maciejasjmj I made a wrong buttumption. Dude isn't an editor, he's a lawyer. Lawyers generally have high expectations with respect to communications as incorrect communication can cost big bucks.

    He also is running an essay competition for students in the US in grades 9-12 about current events. Man appreciates good writing.



  • @Lorne-Kates said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    oh i didn't realize i was applying for a DRIVING job

    This reminds me of a story:
    Once I was doing some contracting and a large company I knew had a shortage in my kind of development work. It was the largest company I had ever worked for, around 200 staff. It was fairly senior work and the MD (CEO) wanted to give me the final grilling. I had known some of the (now senior) colleagues I would be working with for a few years, and many people in the company knew this. This grilling interview was maybe my third official interview in the company, we had talked about my rate and basic scope of work long before.

    ANYWAY: at the end of the grilling he says "of course we have a policy of not hiring contractors, employees (with employment contract) only. But don't worry, we will arrange a suitable salary etc etc". I was pretty cheesed off at the time and did state that contractor makes a lot more sense for his company and maybe we talk about permanent employment after a trial period.
    I mulled the situation over at home and in the meantime I got a official acceptance letter with salary and a pretty standard looking employment contract for me to sign. To be fair the salary was good and other work was starting to dry up.

    Although I had known about the company for a while, now I had actually started and was in the belly of the machine, it turned out working there SUCKS.

    Everyone was standing on top of each other using the threat of 'reporting you to HR' to get their work done, no-one wants to hear about change. A common phrase is 'that's how it's always been done' and when you try to change/review processes the manager or whoever in charge of said process has been in the company for 15+ years and suffered NIH syndrome or 'our process IS modern we adopted it in the 90's' or just 'this is how the MD wants it'. Yeah . Sucks.

    I ended up leaving within 4-5 weeks, no sooner as they had set up my salary tax, payroll etc they had to issue a P45 (End of employment tax form). Well , I did tell the MD it would be easier as contractor, just one invoice.

    To keep a long story short... I don't really talk to anyone there any more regularly as the work I do now is not really in the same realm as them. Except I did bump into one of the friendlier guys and we had a discussion about who wins the award of shortest ever employment in the company. He said it's either me OR...

    Once they took on a sales rep who lived locally and they talked about the role might have a certain field element and if so there is travel allowance expenses etc etc. Nobody actually asked outright if he had a VALID driving license.
    So he had been coming in to the office for around a week for induction/training. On the second week his line manager said, we should start planning some customer visits, we meet at town X, and then visit customer Y. His reply "Oh ok that would be good to meet and then you drive on, you know i need to arrange taxi to town X". His line manager probes into asking why he needs a taxi, the reply:
    "Yeah my license is suspended for 9 months, since I was caught speeding and had a 12 month ban"



  • @Maciejasjmj said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    Yeah yeah yeah millenials are coddled stuck-up spoiled brats and they need someone to get them back to the ground, but this guy isn't really that much more reasonable.

    Did you RTFA? Based on this it doesn't sound like it.

    @Maciejasjmj said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    And it's not all that helpful.

    Not to people like her who refuse to be helped.



  • @Dreikin said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @boomzilla said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    If she ignoresdoesn't ignore his advice like everyone else is probably ignoring her as a job applicant, she perhaps hasmight have a shot at improving and avoiding a career as a bitter and bewildered barista.

    ETFY.

    How rude and unprofessional of you!

    Ugh...that was awful.



  • @masonwheeler said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @Dragnslcr :pendant:ically, a guy in his mid-30s is a millennial. The generation is generally counted as having begun with babies born in 1982 (who therefore turned 18 in the year 2000). Those people are 35, turning 36, this year.

    He was bitching about one millennial in particular. He also said that his best employees are millennials. This chick reminds me of the fizzbuzz failure lady.



  • @Arantor said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    Lawyers generally have high expectations with respect to communications

    Clearly you worked with different lawyers than I did.


  • sockdevs

    @Dragnslcr I used to work with lawyers every day when in the mortgage business.



  • @Arantor Yeah, mine were mostly patent/general IP lawyers.



  • @cartman82 said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    We didn't send rejection letters to any of the people who applied during our last hiring spree. As you say, there's zero benifit. Just wasted time and potential problems.
    If some of the candidates was really good, maybe it would be worth the trouble to establish good relations. But since the CVs we got ranged from mediocre to a 40 year old warehouse clerk who "took a 3 week CSS course", we didn't bother.

    So, if someone who happens to be a developer is making a good-faith effort at least to become familiar with something like CSS but has no hands-on experience with it on the job, how would you treat them?

    I ask because I've been in this situation for 6 months (though luckily I just landed a contract that's rather far away but fits my skills).


  • sockdevs

    @Dragnslcr said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @Arantor Yeah, mine were mostly patent/general IP lawyers.

    They're the worst in my experience. Not even mikeTheLiar worst of the worst but John Oliver's 'you are the WORST, the WORST!'



  • @Arantor said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @Dragnslcr said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @Arantor Yeah, mine were mostly patent/general IP lawyers.

    They're the worst in my experience. Not even mikeTheLiar worst of the worst but John Oliver's 'you are the WORST, the WORST!'

    My two best (read: worst) stories:

    I get home from work at about 8:00 one evening, and within half an hour I get a phone call from a coworker. Apparently, the lawyers never checked to make sure that someone had written the expert report that was due the next day. So I get to spend the next four hours working at home, then we have half the office spend all of the next day helping to throw something together.

    After spending several days trying to explain database tables to a lawyer, he finally has the much-needed epiphany: rows and columns intersect each other.



  • @Dragnslcr said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    @Arantor said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    Lawyers generally have high expectations with respect to communications

    Clearly you worked with different lawyers than I did.

    I'd say lawyers generally need very good communications skills, just like participants in the Underhanded C Contest generally need very good coding skills.



  • @apapadimoulis said in Rejected Rejection Letters:

    It's not about being hyper-litigious, it's more just EEO trolling. The idea of patents are a GoodThing™, and the idea of not being racist/sexist/religiousist is a GoodThing™ is a good thing, but the EEO laws make companies easy targets -- companies lose either way (a "win" in court is hardly worth legal fees and time), so they just settle for a few grand.

    I'm a very independently-minded introverted person, and I unfortunately belong to one of these protected classes (ADA). My vision is bad; I can read well enough, but my distance viewing is awful to the point where I don't drive at all. I also don't really have functional depth perception. It fucking sucks -- that is, losing jobs more than the actual vision problems -- and I don't really want to imagine how many jobs it's lost me. Let's just say I've had my fair share of interviews that went great with everyone involved... and then I never heard from them again. I couldn't say for sure how many interviews my vision problems came up as a topic in, though. I always bring up that I can't drive a car and decent public transit access is a must. I prefer to make my own judgments about whether or not a job is suited for me, and I never pass responsibility on others for my own decisions. Of course, there's no way to know if employers pick that up from my general demeanor.


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