Finding (and getting) a beginner/entry level programming job


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    Having had enough of the carpet world, I'm trying to look for a new job now, and in particular a programming and/or software development one. I have a few problems, though:

    • I didn't really have to search for either of my previous jobs (one was just applying at a bookstore, another was offered to me). As such, I'm not even really sure how to begin looking for a job, much less one that I'm likely to get.
    • I have a big gap of nothing in my work record between those two jobs.
    • I have some knowledge but no real experience. The only code I can point to as having contributed to is the mafiabot code.
    • My formal education only goes up to an associate's degree.
    • I don't have enough money to afford to move somewhere on my own, although family may be able/willing to help with that.

    As for the not-necessarily negative stuff:

    • I can't say I'm an expert in any language yet, but to varying degrees I'm familiar with C, C++, C#, JavaScript, HTML, SQL, and I'm working on improving in C# and SQL in particular.
    • I'm pretty good at abstract stuff, including math, but again: not much formal education.
    • I'd be most interested in stuff related to science, math, signals/signal processing/codecs/etc, or information/asset management, but I know I can't be particularly choosy given the lack of qualifications above.
    • My current location is near Lynchburg, VA. I have family up near DC and down in Palm Beach County, FL that I could probably live with for a bit if necessary. In the very unlikely possibility someone wants to hire me in a different country, I'm willing but have no passport yet.

    I would appreciate any help y'all can give me (or, say, job offers).


  • sockdevs

    @Dreikin said:

    As such, I'm not even really sure how to begin looking for a job, much less one that I'm likely to get.

    Job search websites, local job centres, newspaper listings, etc. Preferably those that specialise in software/IT roles.

    @Dreikin said:

    I have a big gap of nothing in my work record between those two jobs.

    I have a couple of gaps in my CV; it's not as crippling as you may think.

    @Dreikin said:

    I have some knowledge but no real experience.

    Everyone here was in that place at some point.

    @Dreikin said:

    My formal education only goes up to an associate's degree.

    After a couple years' experience, that won't matter even slightly ;)

    @Dreikin said:

    I can't say I'm an expert in any language yet, but to varying degrees I'm familiar with C, C++, C#, JavaScript, HTML, SQL, and I'm working on improving in C# and SQL in particular.

    That's a decent selection that'll allow for a fair few opportunities.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @RaceProUK said:

    Job search websites

    Know any good ones? I've seen glassdoor mentioned around here before, but only in the context of workplace reviews.

    @RaceProUK said:

    I have a couple of gaps in my CV; it's not as crippling as you may think.

    I hope not, but it's a big gap of several years (around 2008-2009 - 2014).

    @RaceProUK said:

    Everyone here was in that place at some point.

    After a couple years' experience, that won't matter even slightly :wink:

    That's a decent selection that'll allow for a fair few opportunities.

    Thanks for the reassurances :smile:


  • mod

    @Dreikin said:

    I'm trying to look for a new job now

    @Dreikin said:

    no real experience

    I strongly suggest contracting. Everyone who works at my company came in via contracting first, as it's a great way to test out a candidate on a time-limited basis and a great way to get a feel for the kind of company you want to work for.

    Here's the listings on the company I used to contract through. They're okay, not the best, but decent enough. https://www.randstadusa.com/jobs/search/virginia/lynchburg/



  • @Dreikin said:

    Having had enough of the carpet world

    You lost me there.

    Screw helping you with your future, I want to know more about this carpet job. Did you sell carpet? Did you lay carpet? Did you munch carpet? What is it with you and carpet?



  • @Yamikuronue said:

    I strongly suggest contracting. Everyone who works at my company came in via contracting first, as it's a great way to test out a candidate on a time-limited basis and a great way to get a feel for the kind of company you want to work for.

    I thought the whole point of contracting was that you got people who knew their shit, so when you're paying them some silly day rate, you're not paying them so they can learn from you?
    That's certainly why we use contractors.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Yamikuronue said:

    I strongly suggest contracting. Everyone who works at my company came in via contracting first, as it's a great way to test out a candidate on a time-limited basis and a great way to get a feel for the kind of company you want to work for.

    Here's the listings on the company I used to contract through. They're okay, not the best, but decent enough. https://www.randstadusa.com/jobs/search/virginia/lynchburg/

    Hm, okay. I'd thought that went the other way around (get experience then contract), but I also remember seeing stories the other way around.


  • mod

    You're thinking of consultants. Contractors can be hired for that purpose, but around here, people contract their junior and midlevel development positions to test people out or to increase capacity on a temporary basis.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Bort said:

    Did you lay carpet?

    This. Laying it actually isn't that terrible - it's the part where people have pets, and those pets pee on the carpet, and then you have to take that up, carry it around, haul it off, etc. There was even one customer whose carpet was soaked - but they wanted to keep a big piece of it in the basement, so we had to haul that around the house for them. (Also, I was technically a helper, but I've been doing more as time goes on.)



  • @Yamikuronue said:

    You're thinking of consultants.

    Well we call them contractors so... *shrug*


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Dreikin said:

    I can't say I'm an expert in any language yet, but to varying degrees I'm familiar with C, C++, C#, JavaScript, HTML, SQL, and I'm working on improving in C# and SQL in particular.

    You can't be worse than the average web developer then. (I was one myself and worked with a few people who probably know less than you. Also, see @arantor's thread in the lounge.)

    @Dreikin said:

    codecs

    Are you talking about video codecs? You like challenges, don't you? There are probably ~50 people in this entire world who make a living developing codecs.


  • sockdevs

    @Yamikuronue said:

    You're thinking of consultants. Contractors can be hired for that purpose, but around here, people contract their junior and midlevel development positions to test people out or to increase capacity on a temporary basis.

    It works a bit differently here; well, the terminology is different anyway.


  • mod

    Technically anyone working under contract can be called a contractor, so it's not wrong, just not how I meant it I gues :)


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Yamikuronue said:

    You're thinking of consultants. Contractors can be hired for that purpose, but around here, people contract their junior and midlevel development positions to test people out or to increase capacity on a temporary basis.

    Ah, that makes sense.



  • We have some staff who are technically contractors as far as my company is concerned, but they're employed as FTE by some other company so they haven't got into "contracting" because they're not directly employed as contractors.



  • Which country are you in?

    edit: Nevermind, I see it, not sure how I missed that the first time around.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @asdf said:

    Are you talking about video codecs? You like challenges, don't you? There are probably ~50 people in this entire world who make a living developing codecs.

    Sound, video, picture, containers, etc. When I mentioned math, I probably should have mentioned that I like it quite a bit. I've looked into some of these things before and found them quite interesting, enough to want to do/see more. My grandfather has also worked on some signals stuff professionally, knows quite a bit, and has offered to teach me at least some of that.



  • There's different laws in the UK about probation period that allows both parties to disengage more easily. In Ireland you usually "contract"for 3 months before being dropped like a hot snot. Its even more retarded then that but I'm not near a computer to see if my experience is actually outdated yet.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    I don't really know much about signal processing and codec development, but I'd guess that it's hard to get a job in that field without a degree in either electrical engineering or computer science. A job as a web developer, OTOH, is relatively easy to get. Be warned, though: Web development can suck sometimes.

    Edit: Basically, my advice would be: Start with web development to get some years of programming experience and start a hobby project about the stuff you're actually interested in (signal processing, …). Then, after 3-5 years, try to switch to the job you wanted in the first place if your web development job starts to annoy you. Otherwise, continue to be a happy web developer.



  • We use the sort of "contractor" described in my post above for low-level non-IT jobs that a moderately trained monkey could do. The only requirement is basically being alive, so because we'll let any idiot start the job, we use "contractors" because we can get rid of them really easily. The probation shit doesn't apply to us because those people aren't employed by us. We just tell them not to turn up tomorrow and the company they do work for finds them something else to do.

    We have "proper" contractors we use in IT where we pay silly day rates and get generally qualified people who know what they're doing. The only learning they require from us is business context.



  • @Dreikin said:

    Laying it actually isn't that terrible - it's the part where people have pets, and those pets pee on the carpet... There was even one customer whose carpet was soaked... (Also, I was technically a helper, but I've been doing more as time goes on.)

    If one interprets "carpet" as my use of the phrase "munch carpet" implied, this post becomes amazing.



  • @Dreikin said:

    I have a big gap of nothing in my work record between those two jobs.

    Try to pretty up this period as much as you can.

    If you did anything related to education (eg. took a course) or entrepreneurship (started a failed business), try to stretch it out a bit. Use it to cover gaps where you were just watching porn and smoking weed (or whatever you were doing).

    BTW, off the books work that you cannot prove you did? Never mind, off into the CV it goes.

    Also, if you have a little side-project or two out of the source control, you can sort of "transplant" it into this period, to fill in a few more months.

    @Dreikin said:

    I have some knowledge but no real experience. The only code I can point to as having contributed to is the mafiabot code.

    Without formal education, you need a bit more IMO.

    @Yamikuronue's idea could work, but the question is whether you can even get a contracting position without ANY experience.

    If not, you need to find some pretend-project and get going with that.

    Make a little site about your favorite hobby. Or your own blog / online CV. Or participate in an OSS project or two. Get Raspberry Pi and create one of those stupid cat chasers. Then make a site about that.

    The more of these you can show off, the lower on the CV can you push your lack of education and gaps in work history.

    We are looking to hire mid-level coders, but if someone came knocking looking to switch careers in their 30-ies, any kind of side project or proof of work could mean the difference between giving them a chance and not.

    @Dreikin said:

    My formal education only goes up to an associate's degree.

    Doesn't matter. No one cares about that shit anymore.

    @Dreikin said:

    I'd be most interested in stuff related to science, math, signals/signal processing/codecs/etc, or information/asset management, but I know I can't be particularly choosy given the lack of qualifications above.

    Sorry, you're not getting that.

    Your best bet is some kind of a frontend or CMS gig in a web shop. A year or two down the road, you can start feeling your way towards better stuff.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @asdf said:

    Basically, my advice would be: Start with web development to get some years of programming experience and start a hobby project about the stuff you're actually interested in (signal processing, …). Then, after 3-5 years, try to switch to the job you wanted in the first place if your web development job starts to annoy you. Otherwise, continue to be a happy web developer.

    Thanks. Web development has been pretty low on my list because it's the area I feel shakiest in, but that may be a reason to try for those jobs in the first place - get practice and confidence there - if they're also the most plentiful / easiest to get.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @cartman82 said:

    Try to pretty up this period as much as you can.

    I'm probably going to try something along the lines of self-education and whatever else I can reasonably (i.e., not lying) come up with.

    @cartman82 said:

    or whatever you were doing

    Being depressed and anxious, mostly.

    @cartman82 said:

    If not, you need to find some pretend-project and get going with that.

    I have one (that's not meant to be pretend), but the requirements are enough that I haven't gotten past planning yet - it's always "But I need to know how to do this to make that work, and there's no point trying to make other thing work until that is done and …". Perhaps I'll try to make a much more limited version of it to start off with.

    @cartman82 said:

    Sorry, you're not getting that.

    I figured, but I thought I'd mention it in case any advice would change based on later goals.

    @cartman82 said:

    @Yamikuronue's idea could work, but the question is whether you can even get a contracting position without ANY experience

    @cartman82 said:

    Your best bet is some kind of a frontend or CMS gig in a web shop. A year or two down the road, you can start feeling your way towards better stuff.

    So that's another endorsement for the temp-like contractor, and for the web-dev/CMS stuff.

    Actually, that reminds me: a cousin has a web-site he's set up for his property business. I may try to convince him to let me do work on it for the reasons you've mentioned.

    Thanks.



  • @Dreikin said:

    I have one (that's not meant to be pretend), but the requirements are enough that I haven't gotten past planning yet - it's always "But I need to know how to do this to make that work, and there's no point trying to make other thing work until that is done and …". Perhaps I'll try to make a much more limited version of it to start off with.

    Trust me, a crappy little project is worth ten times the equal amount of effort spent on courses, certificates and other education-style shit.

    Just get going and produce some turd of a project.
    Then go back and do it again. And again.
    Suddenly, your projects are not such turds any longer.

    That's how you really learn past the basics.

    @Dreikin said:

    Being depressed and anxious, mostly.

    Well shit.

    Wrap it up as a "medical condition that's now resolved". It's better for people to think you broke a leg or had some "real" problem.

    Filed under: NOTE THE FUCKING SARCASM QUOTES, I DON'T WANT TO HEAR ANY CRAP FROM YOU SJW-S YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @cartman82 said:

    Trust me, a crappy little project is worth ten times the equal amount of effort spent on courses, certificates and other education-style shit.

    Just get going and produce some turd of a project.Then go back and do it again. And again.Suddenly, your projects are not such turds any longer.

    That's how you really learn past the basics.

    Will do :thumbsup:

    @cartman82 said:

    "medical condition that's now resolved"

    That is perhaps the best way to describe that that I've seen, and I may use it. The gap may be too big to solely rely on that, though.



  • @Dreikin said:

    The gap may be to big to solely rely on that, though.

    How honest you are about the gap depends on the reason for the gap.



  • @loopback0 said:

    We have some staff who are technically contractors as far as my company is concerned, but they're employed as FTE by some other company so they haven't got into "contracting" because they're not directly employed as contractors.

    That's pretty common, probably more common than independent contracting, at least IME; all but one of my limited number of contract jobs have been I've been employed by the staffing firm. (The other one was a former employer who paid me to come in evenings/weekends to document what I'd been working on when I quit to go to another company.)



  • My jobs have all either come through Dice or LinkedIn. It takes about a month before you start getting calls usually, and then it's just a matter of waiting for someone who isn't insane to call you, at which point you might find opportunities. Took six months before I got anything the first time, though.

    You can be certain that you will get calls and emails that make no sense at all. Probably including 22nd Century, who are hilarious. They recently tried to get me for an "Urgent need" for an "Electronics Technician 2", with much experience at the having and understanding job details.



  • @Magus said:

    Probably including 22nd Century, who are hilarious.

    Yes, I have at least one post about them in the Minor Rants topic, IIRC.

    Edit: https://what.thedailywtf.com/t/small-red-triangle-down-angry-the-minor-rants-thread/3508/952



  • Easiest way to get started might be to get your current employer to let you do some sort of IT work. Granted, carpet installation doesn't sound like there are major opportunities there, but still, you're dealing with someone who already knows you.



  • @Dreikin said:

    I would appreciate any help y'all can give me

    Can you program FIZZBUZZ using a piece of graphite and a roll of toilet paper?



  • I think I'd rather install carpets.



  • @Dreikin said:

    Know any good ones?

    Shove the information in your OP into LinkedIn. I bet you get at least one recruiter calling you before 2 weeks is up. (They might be shady, but it's a step in the door.)

    Talk to everybody, even the shady recruiters. Talk talk talk. Go to interviews for jobs you have absolutely no interest in, or jobs you don't even remotely meet the requirements for. (You don't have to accept the job if offered, and interviewing is GREAT experience.) That's the main thing.

    Do you have any networking? Call your buddy at work and ask if he wants to get coffee. Get the skinny on his company. How many positions do they have open? What technologies do they work with? Have him introduce you to his boss when you get back into the office. Networking is awesomesauce.

    Basically, you never know when the next opportunity will come along, so talk to everybody.



  • @loopback0 said:

    Well we call them contractors so... shrug

    Consultants are contractors; contractors aren't necessarily consultants.



  • @Dreikin said:

    Being depressed and anxious, mostly.

    Man I do that while working. I'm doing it all wrong.



  • @loopback0 said:

    How honest you are about the gap depends on the reason for the gap.

    Have an explanation prepared in case you're asked, but don't volunteer it. (In case you weren't going to be asked.)


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @DogsB said:

    There's different laws in the UK about probation period that allows both parties to disengage more easily. In Ireland you usually "contract"for 3 months before being dropped like a hot snot.

    Indeed. If something is noticed, and actioned, before then. For those that can access it: https://what.thedailywtf.com/t/wtf-employees-that-overstayed-their-welcome/53906



  • @Dreikin said:

    Web development has been pretty low on my list because it's the area I feel shakiest in

    Basic web development is incredibly straight forward to get into, especially if you have any exposure to other stuff. I have recently moved from C++ based development into a shop that deals far more with web apps. My HTML/JS/CSS were pretty rusty and I admitted this in the interview. 3 Months in and I'm more than up to speed in those areas.

    You say that you are working on improving your C# and SQL - This is good. Both my last place and my current place were very keen to see this on my CV, and it is something that is simple for them to test in interviews (so expect it to come up). That said, as long as you know the basics of how and where to use inner and outer joins off the top of your head, you are already doing far better than many candidates.

    @cartman82 said:

    Trust me, a crappy little project is worth ten times the equal amount of effort spent on courses, certificates and other education-style shit.

    Just get going and produce some turd of a project.Then go back and do it again. And again.Suddenly, your projects are not such turds any longer.

    That's how you really learn past the basics.

    THIS X1000

    I have some utter crap projects that I am ashamed to have ever thought were reasonable (Think C, with a little splattering of C++ but not actually written as C++, with all the code in the headers and a few function calls in the implementation files). But I have moved on from those. My code is better(ish) now. I can at least look back and go "What the hell was I thinking"

    Finally, ask for feedback from interviews. When I'm doing the rounds, I will wait a week or so after the interview. If I haven't heard back at this point 99% of the time it means I haven't got it. I will then give the company a ring and see if I can get a little feedback on how they saw me. It gives you an idea of where they view you as strong or weak, and will help a lot for future interviews. Not everybody is willing to give feedback, but if you are reasonable a lot of places are happy to give a little bit.



  • If you don't have work experience, but you think you know enough to handle the job, prepare a portfolio - some software projects you've worked on that can demonstrate your best abilities.

    Mention (in the cover letter if there's no good place in the resume) that you are willing to send it (and give a demonstration, on request) to whoever will be conducting the interview.

    My first employer actually asked this of new hires without job experience (mostly recent graduates.) One or two of the interviewers would look through the code and ask detailed questions about it (in order to make sure the interviewee actually wrote the code and understands it.)

    Small companies and startups are most likely to go for this. Big companies will take one look at the lack of a computer science degree and will stop reading without ever letting someone important get a look.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Magus said:

    Dice or LinkedIn

    /me adds to list.

    My LinkedIn account hasn't been touched in several years, so I definitely need to fix that.

    @Magus said:

    It takes about a month before you start getting calls usually, and then it's just a matter of waiting for someone who isn't insane to call you, at which point you might find opportunities. Took six months before I got anything the first time, though.

    I hope I can find something sooner :grimacing:

    @Magus said:

    You can be certain that you will get calls and emails that make no sense at all. Probably including 22nd Century, who are hilarious. They recently tried to get me for an "Urgent need" for an "Electronics Technician 2", with much experience at the having and understanding job details.

    I think I remember them...

    @HardwareGeek said:

    Yes, I have at least one post about them in the Minor Rants topic, IIRC.

    Edit: https://what.thedailywtf.com/t/small-red-triangle-down-angry-the-minor-rants-thread/3508/952

    Yep.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @boomzilla said:

    Easiest way to get started might be to get your current employer to let you do some sort of IT work. Granted, carpet installation doesn't sound like there are major opportunities there, but still, you're dealing with someone who already knows you.

    Maybe. I hadn't actually looked at the website until now, and it appears to be a template that hasn't been completely customized (e.g., the <title> of the contact page is "Brand Name - Contact Us | {location} | {store name}", where store name and location have been filled in, but the "Brand Name" part is literal. Not our site, but it's the same template as this one (with less options along the top): http://manasotaonline.com/

    So I may be able to do a few things there for them. Editing a template isn't much, but I suppose it's something.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @xaade said:

    Can you program FIZZBUZZ using a piece of graphite and a roll of toilet paper?

    I can probably make a go of it in PHP, does that count?


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @blakeyrat said:

    I think I'd rather install carpets.

    Wanna switch? My clothes-destroying job for your soul-destroying one?

    @blakeyrat said:

    Shove the information in your OP into LinkedIn. I bet you get at least one recruiter calling you before 2 weeks is up. (They might be shady, but it's a step in the door.)

    Will do :thumbsup:

    @blakeyrat said:

    Talk to everybody, even the shady recruiters. Talk talk talk. Go to interviews for jobs you have absolutely no interest in, or jobs you don't even remotely meet the requirements for. (You don't have to accept the job if offered, and interviewing is GREAT experience.) That's the main thing.

    Do you have any networking? Call your buddy at work and ask if he wants to get coffee. Get the skinny on his company. How many positions do they have open? What technologies do they work with? Have him introduce you to his boss when you get back into the office. Networking is awesomesauce.

    Basically, you never know when the next opportunity will come along, so talk to everybody.

    That's going to be difficult (I'm still going to try). I'm not the most social person, and I have pretty much just one IRL friend (outside family) I talk to with any regularity. Thinking on it though, I do know some people I should talk to.

    @blakeyrat said:

    Have an explanation prepared in case you're asked, but don't volunteer it. (In case you weren't going to be asked.)

    Okay, and thanks.


  • sockdevs

    I think it's worth fiddling with a few languages, implementing simple things like FizzBuzz, mergesort, and Fibonacci in all of them. Those algorithms are short, easy to understand, implementable in under 30 LOC in any sane language, and will hit a fair majority of core language features. And do Fibonacci both recursively and iteratively; it's a good way to compare the two approaches.



  • @RaceProUK said:

    implementable in under 30 LOC in any sane language

    How many LOC in a @ben_lubar language?


  • sockdevs

    @HardwareGeek said:

    @RaceProUK said:
    implementable in under 30 LOC in any sane language

    How many LOC in a @ben_lubar language?

    Hmm…

    *does 'maths'*

    My calculations put it around… penguin × sea anemone.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Nocha said:

    Basic web development is incredibly straight forward to get into, especially if you have any exposure to other stuff. I have recently moved from C++ based development into a shop that deals far more with web apps. My HTML/JS/CSS were pretty rusty and I admitted this in the interview. 3 Months in and I'm more than up to speed in those areas.

    Well, that's good. I think I'll start working on learning more of that (while continuing with the other stuff).

    @Nocha said:

    You say that you are working on improving your C# and SQL - This is good. Both my last place and my current place were very keen to see this on my CV, and it is something that is simple for them to test in interviews (so expect it to come up).

    I was initially studying C++, but switched to C# after seeing the commonality of it, the increasing non-MS support of it (linux stuff is important for me)*, and several other things around here.

    *: This is about where Windows decided to BSOD with the helpful message IRQ_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL. Fortunately, Discourse saved most of what I'd written so far. I was going to delete that parenthetical, but leaving it here for humor purposes.

    @Nocha said:

    That said, as long as you know the basics of how and where to use inner and outer joins off the top of your head, you are already doing far better than many candidates.

    Inner joins where the thing needs to have data in both tables, outer where such correspondences are unnecessary?

    @Nocha said:

    THIS X1000

    I have some utter crap projects that I am ashamed to have ever thought were reasonable (Think C, with a little splattering of C++ but not actually written as C++, with all the code in the headers and a few function calls in the implementation files). But I have moved on from those. My code is better(ish) now. I can at least look back and go "What the hell was I thinking"

    I have hope that my time here will help me not do some things, or do things better than I otherwise would have. But @Yamikuronue's already complained at me about some stuff I did in mafiabot, so obviously much further to go. But yes, I need to get cracking on damitall-lite.

    @Nocha said:

    Finally, ask for feedback from interviews. When I'm doing the rounds, I will wait a week or so after the interview. If I haven't heard back at this point 99% of the time it means I haven't got it. I will then give the company a ring and see if I can get a little feedback on how they saw me. It gives you an idea of where they view you as strong or weak, and will help a lot for future interviews. Not everybody is willing to give feedback, but if you are reasonable a lot of places are happy to give a little bit.

    I hadn't thought of that, I'll have to remember it.

    Thanks.



  • I have FizzBuzz here:

    Fibonacci is probably about the same length, but I haven't written it in Cool.

    Good luck with mergesort, though. The only array type in the language is equivalent to Java's Object[]. And string comparison isn't part of the standard library, so you're stuck with integers if you don't want to write your own strcmp. And there's no syntax for "iterate through array" or "iterate from n to m". You're stuck with while loops and managing your own variables.

    I did add goroutines and channels, though. So you can make concurrent mergesort.


  • sockdevs

    @ben_lubar said:

    The only array type in the language is equivalent to Java's Object[]. And string comparison isn't part of the standard library, so you're stuck with integers if you don't want to write your own strcmp.

    *files Cool under 'Languages I will never use'*


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