I'm glad they fixed THAT problem



  • Effective January, 2016 Adobe Flash will officially be called Adobe Animate CC because, obviously, the name was the biggest problem..



  • Shit, I read a tweet about this and thought they were killing it. Well, another thing left for the users.



  • Just like Microsoft. They renamed Windows Vista to Windows 7 and suddenly the world's worst operating system became an amazing technological achievement and profound user interface success story.

    :trolleybus:



  • Personally, I blame Flash for everything that went wrong on the internet since v1.0.



  • @mott555 said:

    Just like Microsoft. They renamed Windows Vista to Windows 7 and suddenly the world's worst operating system became an amazing technological achievement and profound user interface success story.

    :trolleybus:

    But it's got a new hattaskbar!



  • They renamed Vista SP1 to Win 7. That SP1 is important, it is the part that made Vista non-shit.



  • It's a good idea actually. They want to emphasize that it's now a tool to make animations, NOT to create applets that run in web browsers.

    @Zacrath said:

    Personally, I blame Flash for everything that went wrong on the internet since v1.0.

    And that's why.



  • Also, WTF Google(rs)?

    It was announced yesterday!


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @mott555 said:

    They renamed Windows Vista to Windows 7 and suddenly the world's worst operating system became an amazing technological achievement and profound user interface success story.

    I always liked that ad campaign that came out after Vista was widely panned, where they showed people who hadn't seen it yet, and told them it was "Windows code-name something", waited until people said it was pretty cool, and then dropped the "actually, this is just Vista" bomb on them.



  • I remember when some people did that with Ubuntu or something. Can't find the video at the moment...



  • To be fair, it does help with a problem that I've seen here and in other threads on this topic. Everyone has been assuming at first that the announcement is about the browser plugin, Flash Player, and not the development tool.



  • @Dragoon said:

    They renamed Vista SP1 to Win 7. That SP1 is important, it is the part that made Vista non-shit.

    Vista had 2 service packs, so Windows 7 is Vista SP3



  • two names: PHP and Javascript



  • @Jarry said:

    two names: PHP and Javascript

    In a few years it'll be 45...

    Flash, PHP, Javascript, Discourse, Stack Exchange.



  • yeah, let's not forget java applets. and, for some people: Tomcat


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    There is worse: Axis.



  • @dkf said:

    There is worse: Axis.

    We get to support and develop for a vendor-modified version of Axis 1 :headdesk:

    Glad I get to move away from that soon.



  • @Jarry said:

    yeah, let's not forget java applets. and, for some people: Tomcat

    Java applets? On the web? Did that ever exist?


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @FrostCat said:

    I always liked that ad campaign that came out after Vista was widely panned, where they showed people who hadn't seen it yet, and told them it was "Windows code-name something", waited until people said it was pretty cool, and then dropped the "actually, this is just Vista" bomb on them.

    Windows 7 or KDE 4? – 03:11
    — Jupiter Broadcasting

    :trolleybus:



  • @Spanky587 said:

    Vista had 2 service packs, so Windows 7 is Vista SP3

    Windows XP had 3 service packs so Vista is Windows XP SP4 and Windows 7 is Windows XP SP7.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @julmu said:

    Windows XP had 3 service packs so Vista is Windows XP SP4 and Windows 7 is Windows XP SP7.

    So everything from 95 onwards were just service packs and they are just dropping the pretense with 10? :tropical_drink:



  • @anonymous234 said:

    NOT to create applets that run in web browsers.

    … or implement GUI for embedded systems.

    Been there, done that, been disgusted.

    It was back in 2007 or 8, there was already flash (IIRC) 9, but the version available for embedding was one version behind and that version made a big difference, because flash 9 introduced action script 3 and a bunch of other rather important improvements. It also meant we couldn't use flex-or-whatever-the-new-builder-was-called and had to stick to the “creative suite” :shit: with its binary format that was completely unsuitable for versioning and especially merging (that was the only time we used exclusive checkouts and it actually made sense).

    Moreover, the company that was porting flash to the platform (only selected Adobe partners can do that) had serious problems with it and it took very, very long, so we developed on desktop and when we finally got a device, we found it is slow as molasses and had to rework big part of it. In part because while the platform did actually have OpenGL, the flash library was not able to take advantage of it and rendered everything itself in one big buffer.

    So in a sense it was fortunate it was just a demonstrator for a bid and we did not get the contract (the contract required that it supports flash, but not that the whole GUI was implemented in it).


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Planar said:

    Java applets? On the web? Did that ever exist?

    Web services, not applets. Sure, it could've sent applets to clients, but you could do that with any number of other technologies too; that's just static content that you deliver, i.e., trivial. Tomcat is a servlet container.



  • @julmu said:

    Windows XP had 3 service packs so Vista is Windows XP SP4 and Windows 7 is Windows XP SP7.

    Windows 7 is service pack to Windows XP, then Windows 98 was service pack to Windows 3.0.


  • Impossible Mission - B

    It's service packs all the way down!


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Gaska said:

    Windows 98 was service pack to Windows 3.0.

    Not really. 95 was a big change as it inverted where Windows was in relation to the MSDOS. It didn't do very much for stability (except by deleting one or two programs that caused particularly egregious crashes) but it was still quite a change.

    98 was really a service pack of 95, as was ME (AIUI).



  • @dkf said:

    Not really. 95 was a big change as it inverted where Windows was in relation to the MSDOS.

    On top of it, as opposed to... on top of it?



  • I think @dkf meant that Windows 98 was the “main” OS and didn’t depend on the underlying DOS much, while Windows 95 supposedly did. Wikipedia disagrees, though:

    Specifically this bit:

    When the graphical user interface is started, the virtual machine manager takes over the filesystem-related and disk-related functionality. MS-DOS itself is demoted to a compatibility layer for 16-bit device drivers.[17] This contrasts with earlier versions of Windows which relies on MS-DOS to perform file and disk access (Windows for Workgroups 3.11 could also largely bypass MS-DOS when 32-bit file access and 32-bit disk access were enabled). Keeping MS-DOS in memory allows Windows 95 to use DOS device drivers when suitable Windows drivers are unavailable.


  • This change is about as revolutionary as WOW or UMDF (the latter of which was indeed later backported to XP in Service Pack, but that's hardly relevant). UAC wasn't much of a technical achievement, but it significantly changed how users interact with the system. And Aero interface was a major change too - going from software to hardware rendering of all system GUI is kind of big deal. My point is, Vista was about as revolutionary as Windows 95, no matter how similar it behaves and how bad reputation it gained.



  • @Jarry said:

    yeah, let's not forget java applets. and, for some people: Tomcat

    A certain company I do sysadmin stuff for uses both: client-side Java applets fed by, in some cases, Tomcat 6 :mask:



  • @Onyx said:

    :trolleybus:

    Ah, yes, that's what I was thinking of!



  • @Onyx said:

    @julmu said:
    Windows XP had 3 service packs so Vista is Windows XP SP4 and Windows 7 is Windows XP SP7.

    So everything from 95 onwards were just service packs and they are just dropping the pretense with 10? :tropical_drink:

    Now you don't even get service packs. You just get a never ending parade of unfinished betas.



  • @Spanky587 said:

    You just get a never ending parade of unfinished betas.

    Like Discourse then?



  • @Luhmann said:

    Like Discourse then?

    As long as you understand that a Discobeta is really an alpha.



  • @boomzilla said:

    @Luhmann said:
    Like Discourse then?

    As long as you understand that a Discobeta is really an alpha.

    Oh good, that's already in the Discopædia:

    https://what.thedailywtf.com/t/book-teh-o-cial-discopaedia-abarker-creator-and-prophet-of-the-discopaedia/3866/523?u=nedfodder



  • @Spanky587 said:

    Now you don't even get service packs. You just get a never ending parade of unfinished betas.

    Only if you're on the early release channel. Otherwise you get a (semi-)finished beta. (Maybe that means that Enterprise users on the delayed channel actually get an RC?)



  • Did you see that video where I showed women in the street Windows Codename-Something, and when they said it was cool I "dropped the bomb" by punching them in the vagina and stealing their purse?



  • No, seriously, guys, did any of you see that video? Because I was certain I had disabled all the security cameras in the area, but now I'm having doubts.



  • @Lorne_Kates said:

    Did you see that video where I showed women in the street Windows Codename-Something, and when they said it was cool I "dropped the bomb" by punching them in the vagina and stealing their purse?

    I think I saw that one.


  • Grade A Premium Asshole


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.