Spork code



  • As Previously Recorded recently said in their review of Steam Controller:
    "A spork is a utensil with properties of both spoon and a fork, and functionality of neither".

    So I'd like to propose a term "spork code", that would fit that definition: a code with properties of two disparate things, where the attempt to merge those properties resulted in having the functionality of neither.

    The problem is that I've got no specific examples (except maybe most of OR-M frameworks in existence), so I'm asking you: do you have any? If yes, post them, and explain why they fit the definition.



  • From the video

    ...accuracy and functionability...
    :rolleyes:


  • @coldandtired said:

    From the video

    ...accuracy and functionability...
    :rolleyes:

    Yeah, that's bad. They obviously meant "accuracity and functionability".



  • Makefiles.



  • @sh_code said:

    a code with properties of two disparate things, where the attempt to merge those properties resulted in having the functionality of neither.

    No large XML file is either human readable or cleanly structured.


  • BINNED

    Git :trolleybus:

    Finish the joke yourselves



  • @Jaloopa said:

    Git

    Finish the joke yourselves

    That's a nice feature but I bet the command to get it to do that is more arcane then I can stomach



  • @sh_code said:

    (except maybe most of OR-M frameworks in existence)

    ORMs based on Linq provide static validation for queries. In dynamic languages they are almost useless complexity



  • PHP 



  • @flabdablet said:

    No large XML fileschema is either human readable or cleanly structured.

    It's quite possible to have a large, cleanly structured XML file. I've got some nice big data tables with a very plain structure; if I dumped one of those into XML it would certainly be cleanly structured, though useless in every other way.



  • @Scarlet_Manuka said:

    It's quite possible--but based on examples seen, evidently highly unlikely--to have a large, cleanly structured XML file. I've got some nice big data tables with a very plain structure; if I dumped one of those into XML it would certainly be cleanly structured, though useless in every other way.

    FTFY



  • Windows 8.



  • @Dragnslcr said:

    Windows 8.

    ..because I always wanted to pretend my desktop PC was a cellphone.
    INB4 "holding it wrong"...



  • I really liked what Couchbase (or at least the version I tried way back whenever that was) did. You couldn't query things straight from the database. Instead, you wrote a short JavaScript map/reduce function that you could query. So the script might be something like "count the number of posts made by each user" and then you could query "give me the result of that script for this set of user IDs". Or you could disable the reduce function and get a list of the user's posts.



  • I disagree. It's not the function of size, but a function of the number of nesting levels.



  • Two weeks ago I'd agree with this. Today, I disagree. I had to work with Linq2Sql all this time, and I've come to very much understand and love linq, never before have I been able to write a screen-length query that worked with no errors, as intended, on first run. But yeah, just now we're getting to the point in the project where I'll have to concatenate some linq-query vars together (business-logic-like access rights checks/filters/selects + actual data selects), so maybe I'll change my opinion again, we'll see.



  • I don't see where you disagreed with me here.

    I wanted to say, Linq based ORM are good, because they provide static validation and code completion.

    Other ORMs based on dynamic languages, like Python and it's sql alchemy aren't very useful because they don't give me static validation nor code completion. They just makes me need to learn another language.



  • @fbmac said:

    I wanted to say, Linq based ORM are good

    @fbmac said:

    Other ORMs based on dynamic languages, like Python and it's sql alchemy

    oh, my mistake, didn't realize you mean outright platform/language difference. in that case I don't really disagree with you.



  • Not code, but PowerPoint lecture slides at my university. The professors use it for two things:

    • Substitute for lecture notes that they could use to remember what they wanted to present.
    • Substitute for handout lecture notes that we could use to learn the material.

    So the slides are unnecessarily verbose for presentation, but they don't contain enough information to be a useful learning resource.


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