The best keyboard ever ☺



  • Is this a problem looking for a solution?


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    You call that an emoji keyboard?

    THIS is an emoji keyboard!

    Real Life Emoji Keyboard! – 02:13
    — Tom Scott


  • Dupa

    I'll be sure to use it with my one laptop per child computer.



  • I wonder if his keyboards generate actual emoji (rather than emoticons).



  • Does the OLPC support Bluetooth?


  • area_can

    😂😂😂💯👌


  • Dupa

    It sure as hell supports NoTeethTM.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @RevCurtisP said:

    I wonder if his keyboards generate actual emoji (rather than emoticons).

    He hits one of the Windings characters in the video, which have not yet been added to the Emoji set he's using at the time. It showed the invalid/unkonwn Unicode character symbol. Also, it has modifier keys. So yes, it's actual Unicode emoji.

    There's a video where he explains how he made it, too. Should be in the suggestions on the right (if you follow the link to YT) unless YouTube's algos are on the fritz again.




  • Dupa

    You can't post that! You're suspended!




  • Dupa

    Oh no, you did it again!

    Filed under: oops, you did it again.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election


  • area_deu

    Where is :reverse_victory_hand: when you need it?




  • Dupa

    I guess you really liked that Agatha Christie's ABC story.



  • This what I love about this forum.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    We only have :fu:

    It's those damned 'muricans again, not caring for us that want to be rude in our own way!





  • Doctor Zoidberg, soaking in brine.

    <!-- SockBot/2.11.3 (Cheery Chiffon; owner:accalia; user:Zoidberg) 2015-11-07T21:32:13.664Z -->


  • Seems even the Apple set only has "reverse middle finger" <img src="/uploads/default/original/3X/e/d/ed436d206f5c9b200cfaed4c0dea4675a620d021.png" class="emoji" title=:disappointed_face:">



  • @bb36e said:

    😂😂😂💯👌

    I just installed the lastest Deja Vu Sans fonts on my laptop and I still can't see the hand signs ☹


  • area_can

    smh, i think you need ttf-ancient-symbols or something



  • It's a solution looking for a problem, except it's the wrong solution for that problem.



  • A long time ago, the first time I read somewhere that the Japanese language had more than 4000 characters I was curious about how their computer keyboards are. Then I saw that the developer of some free tower building game I was playing at the time was japanese and left his e-mail in the about box. I emailed him, and the other day there was an answer. I was excited I would finally understand how they type all that characters: it was something to the effect of "my keyboard is normal".

    That question continued in my mind for years (there was no wikipedia at the time). When I finally learned they use a normal qwerty keyboard and use key-combinations or something that translate the roman alphabet to theirs as they type (kind of underwhelming after all that wait).



  • Eh, seems pointless when there has been keyboards with small screens in the keys for years.


  • area_deu

    @fbmac said:

    That question continued in my mind for years (there was no wikipedia at the time). When I finally learned they use a normal qwerty keyboard and use key-combinations or something that translate the roman alphabet to theirs as they type (kind of underwhelming after all that wait).

    Basically, phonetics-based smartphone autocomplete. For PC!



  • @fbmac said:

    A long time ago, the first time I read somewhere that the Japanese language had more than 4000 characters I was curious about how their computer keyboards are. Then I saw that the developer of some free tower building game I was playing at the time was japanese and left his e-mail in the about box. I emailed him, and the other day there was an answer. I was excited I would finally understand how they type all that characters: it was something to the effect of "my keyboard is normal".

    Asian languages in general use a predictive system where you type in text phonetically and "input method" software generates the appropriate ideographs when it detects end-of-word text (like spaces.) Where there are multiple possible choices, it will pick one and you have the option to select alternatives. The good input methods will learn your more common choices and adapt.

    In Japanese, the phonetic text may be Latin ("romanji") or it may Japanese's own phonetic characters (katakana and hiragana.) Korean does the same, but with its own phonetic alphabet instead of katakana/hiragana. In Chinese, where there is no actual phonetic alphabet, they may use Latin characters or a character set created especially for data entry (like [URL=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bopomofo]Bopomofo[/URL]).

    Chinese also has several [URL=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_input_methods_for_computers]non phonetic input methods[/URL], most of which work with "normal" keyboards, although there are several historic examples that require special keyboards.



  • If everyone just used lojban, we wouldn't have this problem!


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    But then we'd use lojban.

    I'm willing to accept current solutions as a better alternative.



  • You know how to say "fuck off" in Lobjan?

    Imagine I'm saying it.



  • @tufty said:

    oi'o ko cliva

    Ok. Now what should I do?



  • @David_C said:

    Korean does the same, but with its own phonetic alphabet instead of katakana/hiragana.

    Korean (Hangul) is an alphabetic script, written with separate letters just like the Latin alphabet, but arranged into squares to form syllables so that they look somewhat like Chinese characters.

    [quote=Wikipedia]On a Korean computer keyboard, text is typically entered by simply pushing a key for the appropriate jamo [letter or digraph]; the operating system creates each composite character on the fly. Depending on the IME and keyboard layout, double consonants can be entered by holding the shift button. When all jamo making up a syllabic block have been entered, the user may initiate a conversion to Hanja or other special characters using a keyboard shortcut or interface button; South Korean keyboards have a separate key for this. Subsequent semi-automated hanja conversion is supported to varying degrees in word processors.[/quote]



  • @tufty said:

    You know how to say "fuck off"

    * Imagines a "fuck off" as a type of contest

    :giggity:



  • That would be gleterjvi.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Onyx said:

    But then we'd use lojban.

    I'm willing to accept current solutions as a better alternative.

    How about English? And not any of this shitty American English nonsense, proper English as spoken in England.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    isn't it great that after developing writing system that can express anything while only containing 30-odd glyphs we are now going back to communicating with pictographs. Yay.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @royal_poet said:

    isn't it great that after developing writing system that can express anything while only containing 30-odd glyphs we are now going back to communicating with pictographs. Yay.

    BUT ITZ ADVANCED AND SCIENCY AND STUFF.

    While I'm not opposed to using emoji, I agree that this is... at best, a problem looking for a solution.

    Plus it's a Mac keyboard, and there's no Windows option.

    Filed Under: :fa_windows: master race, WTF is Command, etc



  • This post is deleted!

  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    Including pictographs of 'man in a suit levitating'.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    :man_in_a_suit_levitating:




  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    E_DISCOMOJI_NOT_FOUND<a



  • @royal_poet said:

    we are now going back to communicating with pictographs. Yay.

    I think you'll find that's "failing to communicate"

    or :wtf: :fa_comments_o:



  • @Gurth said:

    @David_C said:
    Korean does the same, but with its own phonetic alphabet instead of katakana/hiragana.

    Korean (Hangul) is an alphabetic script, written with separate letters just like the Latin alphabet, but arranged into squares to form syllables so that they look somewhat like Chinese characters.

    Yes, Hangul is a phonetic script, but Korean also uses Hanja, which (like Kanji in Japanese) was imported from Chinese. Although mostly used only for historic texts, they are still a part of the language and are supported by Korean input methods, but not with identical semantics because Hanja are not commonly used for modern writing.

    See also [URL=https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/130053]Microsoft's Hangul IME[/URL] which describes what I was describing. You can enter text with Latin or Korean characters, which are combined by the IME. In the Microsoft IME, there is a button to convert Hangul to Hanja (vs automatic conversion that is usually performed with Japanese and Chinese IMEs.) Other IMEs may or may not automatically do this conversion.

    Your Wikipedia quote, BTW, says the same thing.

    Depending on your OS and applications, there may be many different IMEs to choose from. For example, on Mac OS X 10.8 (what I'm using right now) there are 8 different Chinese methods (3 simplified and 5 traditional), 5 different Korean ones, and 6 different Japanese IMEs. They will, of course, not all behave identically.



  • @David_C said:

    Yes, Hangul is a phonetic script, but Korean also uses Hanja, which (like Kanji in Japanese) was imported from Chinese.

    Since we’re being pedantic on TDWTF, your were the one who specifically said “Korean does the same, but with its own phonetic alphabet [my emphasis] instead of katakana/hiragana.” My reply therefore wasn’t about Chinese or Chinese-derived characters, but about the “native” Korean characters that can be typed directly using a keyboard with a realistic number of keys.

    @David_C said:

    5 different Korean ones

    Which, at first sight, seem to actually be three, two others being variations on them.


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