Pointless keybinds



  • So, I'm on Visual Studio, and I hit Ctrl+Z to undo a few changes (mainly to review what things had looked like beforehand), and then afterwards, hold Ctrl+Y to redo all of them.

    Only I didn't hold Ctrl+Y, but instead accidentally hit Ctrl+T. In Visual Studio (mostly fresh installation with default keyboard settings), Ctrl+T apparently shifts the character to the right of the cursor over by one character. So, if you have a line like

    public void foo()
    

    And the cursor is on the beginning of the line, if you hold Ctrl+T you'll see the p travel from the beginning of the line to the end.

    ublic void foo()p
    

    ...after which, if you keep holding Ctrl+T it will alternate the position of p between before the paren and after it.

    Curious as to what problem this keybind was supposed to solve, I thought maybe highlighting a word or something might yield some useful reason one might want to do this. Nope. Hitting Ctrl+T while text is highlighted will simply unhighlight the text, and then move only the last character that was highlighted over.

    The only "use" I can find for something like this is if you typo'd a word so that two letters were switched, but that's a stretch, since it's just as easy to just retype the two letters and move on.

    Does anyone have any ideas as to why such a keybind is available? It just seems so random and pointless to me.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    It feels like something from VIM to me.



  • I was thinking of VIM or Emacs, but even then, they'd likely use something a little more esoteric like Ctrl+Alt+Shift+T+9 or something.



  • This is something that emacs hardcores tout, like "you haven't really learned to use emacs until you've mastered ctrl-t". It's transpose-char, and meta-t is transpose word in the same way. They are quite handy when writing text, to fix the odd tyop. They would be even better if the default was to transpose the two characters just to the left of the cursor (C-u -1 C-t), but there you go. I think the rationale is that rather than deleting two characters and then re-find then in the right order, you just C-t them.


  • SockDev

    @Weng said:

    It feels like something from VIM to me.

    not VIM. it uses buckybits. that's more likely a EMACS thing.



  • In vim it's a combination of two otherwise useful actions - x to delete the character currently under the cursor, plus p to paste the most recently yanked or deleted text after the cursor.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    Concrete things I know about VIM:

    Insert key a few times puts it in a recognizable editor mode.

    Insert key a few more times puts it back it command mode.

    I have to look up how to exit every time.


  • SockDev

    @Weng said:

    I have to look up how to exit every time.

    ESC:q!ENTER to force quit

    or

    ESC:wqENTER to write then quit


  • SockDev

    @The_Quiet_One said:

    Curious as to what problem this keybind was supposed to solve

    One of the more common tyops: the transposition


  • SockDev

    now that you mnetino, teht wolud be hnady fro me!



  • ESC:wqENTER to write then quit

    I would just go with

    ESC:xENTER


  • SockDev

    So not

    kill -9 <pid>
    apt-get remove vim
    apt-get install nano
    

    :question:



  • @Weng said:

    VIM: [...] I have to look up how to exit every time.

    We've got a single tool at work that we occasionally need to use, which dumps you into emacs as an editor by default. I always find myself having to google hoow to save&exit. It's ctrl-C ctrl-X ctrl-Z, or something.


  • SockDev

    Ctrl-XCtrl-C


  • SockDev

    @RaceProUK said:

    So not

    kill -9 <pid>
    apt-get remove vim
    apt-get install nano
    

    :question:

    -_-

    Barbarian......



  • You're forgetting good ol' ZZ:

    ESCZZ


  • SockDev



  • Few programs have as many choices for quitting as vi. It's like a difficult-to-find apology from the original developers.



  • @The_Quiet_One said:

    Ctrl+Y to redo

    TRWTF



  • Why? Ctrl+Y is redo in nearly all programs I've ever used.


  • SockDev

    And Ctrl+U is commonly underline


  • BINNED

    I have seen Ctrl+Y used to remove current line, Ctrl+Shift+Z is more universal.


  • BINNED

    @LB_ said:

    Why? Ctrl+Y is redo in nearly all programs I've ever used.

    I learned to loathe it while using QWERTZ. Not the specific shortcut, but the positioning. Since Z and Y you have to hit that awkward combination a lot.

    Maybe I wouldn't hate it otherwise, But as it stands, GET IT OFF MY LAWN!


  • SockDev

    That's more down to developers who don't localise their keybindings correctly; after all, the reason Undo/Cut/Copy/Paste is Ctrl+Z/X/C/V in a QWERTY layout is nothing to do with the markings on the keycaps.


  • BINNED

    @RaceProUK said:

    That's more down to developers who don't localise their keybindings correctly

    Every single application I ever used didn't remap a damned thing when it comes to Y and Z bindings.

    Also, there were (are?) some fun games that love to always show the binding depending what character is placed there on QWERTY. Or show it one way in the settings but read it the other in-game. That was always fun!

    Hope they didn't do the same on AZERTY 'cause man, that would be an even bigger mess.


  • SockDev

    Even better, one of these:



  • I though to exit vim you had to do this?

    Esc : ! sudo rm -rf /

    It is strange how you have to enter your password (mine is hunter2) to exit with this though. But that is all part of being a l33t hax0r.



  • No, you have to use sudo rm --no-preserve-common-sense -rf /



  • @RaceProUK said:

    apt-getyum -y install nanoalpine

    Heathens...



  • @dse said:

    I have seen Ctrl+Y used to remove current line

    Yes, by stupid programs.



  • I may be a vi/vim fan, and I don't want to start any flame wars, but really, people who think that the Escape key is part of the command probably do not appreciate vi to the extent it merits. Hitting the Escape key signals the end of the previous typing command, and an experienced user will usually hit escape as a reflex as soon as a burst of typing is finished. I often quip that vi is a text editor . . . it's not for writing text, only for editing it!



  • @dse said:

    I have seen Ctrl+Y used to remove current line, Ctrl+Shift+Z is more universal.

    I think you mean "yank out" the current line.

    Neither of those key combos is sufficiently universal to prevent me from checking the Edit menu every time I switch applications.



  • @LB_ said:

    Why? Ctrl+Y is redo in nearly all programs I've ever used.

    CtrlShiftZ is so much more intuitive and easy to press. CtrlY is #1 reason for clinodactyly.



  • I agree, but if that happens to you when you hit Ctrl+Y, you must have one weird keyboard...



  • @LB_ said:

    No, you have to use sudo rm --no-preserve-common-sense -rf /

    It's better to prevent launching it in the first place.

    alias vi=sudo rm --no-preserve-common-sense -rf /
    alias vim=vi



  • @Weng said:

    Concrete things I know about VIM:
    ...
    I have to look up how to exit every time.

    I have the same problem with emacs.



  • Is it even possible to type on that without hen-pecking.


  • Impossible Mission Players - A

    @xaade said:

    without hen-pecking.

    Absolutely! There's no "home row", but I would bet that there are raised identifier bumps for each area. :wink:



  • Does anyone ranted here yet about Ctrl+Alt+<some letter> keybindings in programs like Eclipse and Visual Studio?

    Because on every single machine I had to manually hunt for and turn off Ctrl+Alt+B, Ctrl+Alt+N, Ctrl+Alt+C, Ctrl+Alt+F, Ctrl+Alt+G in order to be able to write code using the {, }, &, [, ] characters, because they require the Alt Gr key.

    WHICH WOULD BE THE ENTIRE POINT OF AN IDE!


  • BINNED

    Ah, yes, the joys of applications that don't differentiate Alt from Alt Gr.

    I had my run ins with those. Then I decided that my fingers like me more when I switch to QWERTY


    Filed under: Fuck \ being mapped to Alt Gr Q with a spiky purple dildo



  • One of our CRM apps has CtrlZ bound to something that isn't undo, but only in the Sys Admin part of the app.



  • @Onyx said:

    I switch to QWERTY

    You decided to switch keyboards and it wasn't to Dvorak?


  • BINNED

    I saw no need to re-learn everything. I just wanted to make it easier on myself. Other than Y and Z being swapped the rest of the letter placement is the same so my muscle memory was still valid for regular typing, only thing I had to re-learn was punctuation, basically.



  • @Onyx said:

    Ah, yes, the joys of applications that don't differentiate Alt from Alt Gr.

    I wish they didn't! Imagine what it would be like to have left shift and right shift do something drastically different - that's how I feel with AltGr!

    And handling AltGr keypress is utter PITA.


  • BINNED

    @Gaska said:

    I wish they didn't!

    And then they put a shortcut on AltB. And you want to type a {. WHOOPS!

    @Gaska said:

    And handling AltGr keypress is utter PITA.

    Yeah, I'm aware, I read up on the subject once and it made my head hurt. I consequently purged it from my memory.

    @Gaska said:

    Imagine what it would be like to have left shift and right shift do something drastically different - that's how I feel with AltGr!

    And that is why I switched to the layout that doesn't require its use...



  • @Gaska said:

    that's how I feel with AltGr!

    Ah, I take it you're the one guy who's using Polish-214?


  • BINNED

    Hey, give the man a break, I got a document encoded in Windows-1250 just the other day. Some people still think it's modern enough to use, apparently.



  • Could've been worse, could've been CP852. Or Mazovia.



  • @Maciejasjmj said:

    Ah, I take it you're the one guy who's using Polish-214?

    No. I just wish I could type ą/ę/ż/ź/ć single-handed.



  • Wow. I read that and now I just feel kind of sad and ache-y.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.