Sorry, LaShaquilleanda, I'm not taking the chance



  • Hey guys, we haven't had a good flamewar in a while (like 2 days). So here's one on reddit.

    ###What are some red flags on a resume?

    Ghetto names. Sorry, LaShaquilleanda, I'm not taking the chance. Same goes for obvious trailer names, like 'Chrystyl'. Ethel, Mary...head of the line.

    Another guy elaborates a bit further:

    It's about perception, if I have someone coming in wanting to open an account and deposit $20,000, I want them to feel that their money is safe. Say I have two potential bank employees I'm hiring that might handle this transaction, one is named John Richardson, the other is named Le-ah ('cause the dash don't be silent) Shequan. With equal credentials I'm obviously going with John. It's a name that conjures up an image of an upstanding citizen, a white man with a short haircut and a suit. Honest, dependable, sociable. The other name conjures up a welfare queen, a fat black woman in a messy ghetto apartment, cursing that the child support check hasn't come yet and beating one of her 8 smelly little nigglets. Repulsive, untrustworthy, hostile. Even if in this one particular case that's not true, the customer's perception is all that matters between them depositing their money here, or somewhere else. This is increasingly important in the modern world with electronic communication, in an e-mail the name might be the only indication of a person's character.

    The other point is that a name gives into a person's upbringing. John was given a good name by his parents, a safe respectable name that no one would question. He was also probably raised by responsible married parents who taught him good values and morals. Le-ah isn't even a real name, the mother was probably underage and trying to be edgy and different, without foresight into the name's effect on the child. The child was probably raised in a chaotic unstable home, maybe without a husband/father in the picture. Even if by luck they turn out okay and maybe even get a college education, you have to wonder what problems are simmering under the surface waiting to present themselves at the most obtrusive time. You also have to wonder if supposedly turned out so good as she presents herself, why didn't she change her name to something less embarrassing?

    You're right, maybe it is just a name. Maybe she is actually a good person despite her terrible title, maybe she won't try to defraud accounts (something that I have personally seen happen twice) and maybe she'll even be our star employee (something I've never seen), but that's a lot of a maybes and a lot of gambles I'm taking.

    Or I can hire John.

    I can't afford to be reckless, in this business minimization of risk is the name of the game. If I have to choose between explaining to my irate boss why our profits are shit and being thought of as racist by virgin neckbeards on Reddit, I'll take being racist any day.

    Everyone else is screaming at them they are racists.

    Me?

    Of course, of course, OF COURSE THEY ARE RACIST.

    ....

    ....



  • We German teachers have a saying over here:

    "Kevin1) is not a name, it's a diagnosis."


    1) For some reason, Eastern Germany was enamoured with Hollywood names after the wall fell. Thus Kevin from "Home Alone" or Dustin as in "Dustin Hoffmann". And before you're asking, no, David never caught on



  • I don't think we have this concept of "untrustworthy names" in Serbia.

    Except Gipsy names. But that's just racism.



  • See, that's why everyone should just receive a GUID at birth. That solves so many problems.



  • @Maciejasjmj said:

    See, that's why everyone should just receive a GUID at birth. That solves so many problems.

    I wouldn't give my money to a bank teller with a guid for a name.



  • Hey, now, my son's first name is {d6fd6755-50dc-457a-b697-d05c9a544309} and I assure you it's no laughing matter.

    @cartman82 said:

    I don't think we have this concept of "untrustworthy names"

    Nobody at your country names their kids, like, "Dżessika" or "Ksavier" or some other phonetic, mangled variation of a western name?



  • @Maciejasjmj said:

    Nobody at your country names their kids, like, "Dżessika" or "Ksavier" or some other phonetic, mangled variation of a western name?

    Not that I know of.

    Either way, wouldn't be an issue on a CV. Without a distinct community to be tied to such names, you can't form a prejudice.


  • BINNED

    Look, we're done fighting with Romans, Turks, Austrians and Hungarians. Now we're bored so we fight amongst ourselves. Given that the names are so similar/same we can't use that kind of prejudice since everyone has the same names...

    Well, fuck, actually... yeah, I guess Serbian [variations of] names here would get that treatment. If it's not the other way around there chalk yourselves a +1 for that.



  • Here, I think it might be. Not with regard to any specific community, but because the first impression you make is that you were brought up by up to a pair of retards.

    Wacky names seem to be a black thing in the US, but here it's mostly associated with all-grown-up valley girls who got insane over their little special snowflake. You know, the kind of parent that blames everyone for their kid's problem except for the kid.

    So yeah, if I were to hire such kid straight out of school, I'd be wary, because there are good chances they'll turn out to be a spoiled brat.



  • @Onyx said:

    Well, fuck, actually... yeah, I guess Serbian [variations of] names here would get that treatment. If it's not the other way around there chalk yourselves a +1 for that.

    Well, "Hrvoje" would probably raise an eyebrow, but IMO nothing more than that. At least in the IT sector.

    @Maciejasjmj said:

    Wacky names seem to be a black thing in the US, but here it's mostly associated with all-grown-up valley girls who got insane over their little special snowflake.

    Yeah, it's more about prejudice in general. Racism is just a US-specific flavor of it.

    Personally, I'm fascinated by the concept of prejudice. How it makes sense in one way, but is harmful in another, to all particpants. The clash of emotions and logic, the short term vs long term benefit. The social pressure for people not to use their best reasoning, and the very good arguments behind it. Very interesting.


  • BINNED

    @cartman82 said:

    Well, "Hrvoje" would probably raise an eyebrow, but IMO nothing more than that. At least in the IT sector.

    I do find most people who work in IT much more reasonable than most 'round these parts, so I'd agree there. In a case of a bank like in the example though, I could see someone having the same line of thinking as the above.

    @cartman82 said:

    Personally, I'm fascinated by the concept of prejudice. How it makes sense in one way, but is harmful in another, to all particpants. The clash of emotions and logic, the short term vs long term benefit. The social pressure for people not to use their best reasoning, and the very good arguments behind it. Very interesting.

    QBLWNE



  • I'm all for evaluating everyone on their own merits, don't get me wrong. But sometimes, you just can't do without a heuristic.



  • First impressions and all that sort of thing, too. Easy to make the wrong connection with what appears to be correlations in your experience. Averages and tendencies aren't individuals.


  • Fake News

    Whoah, the obnoxious hyperbole in that reddit thread - it's over 9000!


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    @Maciejasjmj said:

    Wacky names seem to be a black thing in the US

    It's more subtle than that: "wacky" names like Sheniqua read as black and "ghetto" and "low income", but perfectly normal names like Apple or Moonbeam or Blue Ivy read as white and thus "unusual" but also probably "wealthy".

    And then there's the REALLY wacky names, like Mohammad...



  • @Yamikuronue said:

    ...but perfectly normal names like Apple or Moonbeam or Blue Ivy read as white and thus "unusual" but also probably "wealthy".

    Maybe. But at best inherited wealth and probably spoiled and untrustworthy. Or possibly children of hippie druggies. My cousin was trying to adopt a couple of sisters (fell through because the social worker lied to them about how involved the mom was with the kids, but that's a whole 'nother story) and one of them was named Rainbow by the druggie mom.

    They were planning on changing the name.


  • area_deu

    @boomzilla said:

    Rainbow

    Better than Rainbow-



  • Indeed. What was it, 3 seconds to form a first impression?

    Plus, I'm at the frontlines when it comes to mangled names. I mean, sometimes the poor kids don't even know themselves how their name is actually pronounced because their parents went for looks, stuff like "Yves" or "Pierre Gilbert". They're supposed to be pronounced in the French way but, due to the fact that their parents don't know a single lick of French, it becomes hideously mangled.

    And then there are those who exchange some letters or add vowels needlessly. A short excerpt from my current class lists, the stem in brackets:

    Marsel (Marcel), Jasemine (Jasmin), Damien-Lee (no idea), Devid (David), Mclloyd (yeah...), Mareile (Mareike), Kenneth (though he insists that it's pronounced without the 'th'), ...



  • I have a hard time remembering anyone's names, mostly because my mind automatically filters them out of conversation. "Hi, my name is and I will be helping you today." I just roll with it.


  • BINNED


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