Why Insider program cannot replace solid internal testing



  • Continuing the discussion from What are the pros/cons to upgrading to Windows 10?:

    @xaade said:

    I'm seeing a lot of fanboy and anti-fanboy commentary out there, but no concrete information.

    Suggestions?

    And try not to hype, just state plainly.

    I want to know if my machine will perform better.



  • I upgraded my Surface Pro 3 from Win8.1 to Win10 two weeks ago.

    Yesterday, when I tried to use Word 2013 to edit some document, it said my version is unlicensed and need to activate.

    No big deal, so I login my Microsoft account and try to activate, and this time I found I fall into activation loop.

    This is the first time ever since Win3.1 that I found MS Office cannot survive Windows upgrade, and it lets you wonder whether Microsoft had depended too much on the "Insider Program".

    Chances are most "Insider Program" users are also pirated copied of MS Office user, so they can only help Microsoft ensure pirated version of Office can survive the upgrade, but not the genuine copies.



  • Upgrading to Windows 10 gave me a non-removable "OneNote" icon on my start menu that tells me I don't own OneNote when I try to open it.



  • My legit Office 2013 install survived the Windows 10 upgrade absolutely fine.



  • Additional :wtf: found during the activation process:

    1. Ctrl-C doesn't work on the error message dialog. IMO this function also exist back since Win3.1 but I found that I can no longer "copy and paste" the error message out under Win10. Whoever made the dialog should seriously consider to fix it ASAP because this is an important part in assist troubleshooting for users.

    2. If you make the dialog idle for like 5 minutes, it'll close itself and Word automatically. But if you had pressed "Help", it'll also close whatever browser instance along with it (not just the tab). So... you guessed it, the Word also "helpfully" closed all the web pages I opened in attempt to find troubleshooting tips. Nice work, Microsoft!



  • Mine cannot, and I'm not the only one.

    I purchased my Office 2013 box through official Microsoft wholeseller, so I don't think there is problem in the license itself. And the error message say it cannot install the license key to the system so I don't think that is the problem.

    I did try to "run as adminstrator" but it didn't help.

    The machine is used for work, so it only has Office, VS2015, SQL 2014, Windows Defender and various SDKs installed, I think it's simple enough "development only" environment.



  • @cheong said:

    I purchased my Office 2013 box through official Microsoft wholeseller, so I don't think there is problem in the license itself

    I've noticed the licencing seems to be getting worse generally. A couple of Windows 7 boxes at work have magically decided they are suddenly counterfeit at various times and a shrink-wrapped Office 2013 Home and Business from a major supplier said it had been activated too many times on first install.
    All of those required using the terrible phone activation thing ('next enter all 700 characters from block Z....').


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @loopback0 said:

    y legit Office 2013 install survived the Windows 10 upgrade absolutely fine.

    My legit Office 2010 on my work PC survived.



  • @cheong said:

    Ctrl-C doesn't work on the error message dialog

    I noticed that it works only for some, but not all, message dialogs since about Windows Vista. A serious nuisance.



  • Yeah, it's not consistent and it's definitely not new to Windows 10.



  • My theory is that the phone line robot is programmed to always approve your request, and the long sequence of like 58 numbers is just to determine whether you are worthy.



  • Btw, the following is what I saw last night.

    I can't use Ctrl-C, and Surface needs key combination to capture screen that I don't use often so cannot remember, so I used the snipping tool instead.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @blakeyrat said:

    My theory is that the phone line robot is programmed to always approve your request, and the long sequence of like 58 numbers is just to determine whether you are worthy.

    You could validate that theory with real-world testing.

    If you don't tell it no computers are using that key, you'll fail. (But you can call right back and try again. Hint: When you are asked how many computers it's installed on, they mean other than the one you're calling about.) If it can't understand you say the letters it'll make you repeat the block.


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