Correlation vs causation


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    Part of GP pay is linked to diagnosing and treating diabetes - and has been for years. The government says this is to improve care.

    Suggestions as to the proportion of correlation and causation between the headline and the quote are left as an exercise for the student.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @PJH said:

    Suggestions as to the proportion of correlation and causation between the headline and the quote are left as an exercise for the student.

    I remember this one from the radio yesterday. It's definitely part of it — the doctors say as such — but it doesn't account for the whole effect. Other factors seem to include an ageing population and problems with lifestyle and diet.



  • As a non-native English speaker, I have serious difficulty remembering the difference between words soar, sour and sore.



  • If this is a general topic, then: I've noted, anecdotally, a weighted bell-curve correlation between IQ and financial success, that is to say, the majority of those who are successful have measured 'general intelligence' (whatever that means) slightly above the average, but that success drops off sharply after a certain point.

    Now then: what causative factors could be connecting the two? This observation - assuming it isn't pure bias on my part - tells me nothing about the actual reasons why this occurs, so I can;t say if the two are really causally related at all, either directly (i.e., rated IQ affects success) or indirectly (the factors that lead to rated IQ results also affect financial success). Even if I could somehow confirm this observation, without a lot more information I would not be able to draw any useful conclusions from it.

    Discuss.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @ScholRLEA said:

    Now then: what causative factors could be connecting the two?

    ?



  • @ScholRLEA said:

    Discuss.

    Already been done.



  • Fair enough. In any case my original statement (which I already mentioned was purely subjective) was so loaded with ambiguities (especially with the term 'financially successful', which as I realized after I posted this could mean almost anything) as to be utterly useless anyway.

    Your point about social intelligence (as some psychologists call it, IIRC) being just as meaningful as the 'general intelligence' supposedly measured by IQ test is a good one, though. The problem is that most people don't see it as part of intelligence, especially people who have focused on something other than social skills to the detriment of social skills. Being just such a person (and aware of it, unlike cfgauss apparently), it is hard for me to take social skills seriously, even though I know damn well that they are more important as a practical matter than any amount of mad haqor skilz.

    However, it should be added that a certain amount of overfocus is often needed to hone certain types of skills, which leads to other skills getting ignored. Guess which skills people like, say, RMS (or myself) chose to ignore? I'm a lot less unbalanced these days, but that just shows how bad I used to be...

    In my case, I also had my father's bad example of how dangerous being very skillful at social interaction can be - he was the sort who turned everything into a sales pitch, and usually got away with it. Why is this bad? Because people would get suckered in, then later realized they had been suckered, and turn on him. For all that I cared for him, his asshole behavior made it very difficult for me to deal with him in the last few years of his life. Watching him while growing up was a large part of what put me off meaningful social interaction for so long, since I had 'learned' to see social interaction as a dog-eat-dog game of oneupsmanship, and got thoroughly disgusted with it.


  • BINNED

    @ScholRLEA said:

    Why is this bad? Because people would get suckered in, then later realized they had been suckered, and turn on him.

    Those who are successful do use others, but think of them as investment rather than cash. You do not want to spend all your allowance, by treating people like disposable objects. I guess this (the fact that karma is a bitch) should be part of the social intelligence.



  • Fair enough; Dad had the first part down, but his (undiagnosed but very probable) Narcissistic Personality Disorder didn't let him really understand the latter.


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